Technical Help from the Solid Axle Corvette Club

 

 

To submit a technical question regarding a 1953 to 1962 Corvette, simply email
sacctech@solidaxle.org
. In the subject box you need to put "sacctech/ (your SACC
membership number)".  Example: sacctech/1234
If you are not a member, your question will not be excluded, however, it won't get priority.

Disclaimer:
Our officers enjoy answering questions about your Corvette. Please keep in mind before asking questions that we are not qualified or certified to diagnose problems you may be experiencing with your Corvette. It is recommended that an A.S.E. (Automotive Service Excellence) certified automotive technician diagnose the vehicle for you. This way you get an accurate diagnoses on the problem and an understanding of the parts necessary to remedy the problem

Keep in mind that members enjoy a wealth of information via the SACC quarterly magazine, On Solid Ground.  Here are some of the topics contained in the Spring, 2008 issue:

-Insulate Your Solid Axle

-1956 Goodyear Corvette

-Harmonic Balancer Re-Install

-Six Cylinder Corner

-Will We Need NOS Engine Oil for out Old Cars?

-The Willet Run Garage

-The Marketplace - Member Classifieds

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Hi, I am replacing my whitewall 670X15 bias ply tires and stock wheels with radial tires and custom wheels for better handling on my 1958 Corvette, and only using the bias ply for show purposes. I have been told I can use Torquethrust 2 -15X 7 wheels and p225r tires. What I have seen on this tech site is that 15X6 wheels and p205r  tires would be the largest  that would fit. I would like your advice please, thanking you in advance , Bill.

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Bill, the first thing you need to keep in mind with your 58 is that the front suspension is from a 1949 Chevrolet sedan, and is designed for 5 inch wheels and the 6.70x15 tire.  The optional wheel was 5.5 inches.  This is the same wheel that the 1963-7 Stingrays used, but the center hole has to be enlarged slightly to fit over the larger front hubs that C1's used. These wheels do not have the ability to mount the full wheel covers that the 56-62 models used.  Going to 6 and 7 inch wheels with 205 or 215 radial tires is asking for trouble with fender lip breakage and frequent front wheel bearing failure.  Whatever wheel you try to use, the offset must be the same as the stock wheel, or you will place unacceptable loads on the small outer wheel bearing, resulting in frequent failure of this bearing.  This is the case even if you go to replacement tapered roller bearings in place of the stock ball bearings. Basically, the center line of whatever wheel you end up with must be directly over the large inner wheel bearing, which is designed to carry the weight of the vehicle.  Changing the wheel offset, in or out, causes more of the vehicle weight to be borne by the small outer bearing, which it is not designed to do.  The rear axle bearings on C1's are not affected by changes in wheel offset from stock.
The correct radial tire size for your car is 195 75R15.  This size is not common, but it is the only size that works properly on 5 and 5.5 inch wheels.  The 205 and 215 sizes require 6 inch rims to work properly, and these heavy tires cause a high unsprung weight, resulting in a harsh ride.
I will try to forward to you a lengthly analysis on C1 tires I wrote just yesterday.  If you want awsome handling and super wide tires on your ride, sell your 58 and buy a new C7.
 
Larry Pearson

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The Torquethrust Wheels and tires will fit and you will love the look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello I just bought a 1962 corvette, it started for me and ran... As soon as I touched the button on the knob, on the left of steering wheel under the temp gauge, the car died. I can't jump it or start it now ... I was wondering what that button did??? If u can help I'd be greatly appreciated thx...Justin

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:   It is the windshield washer system vacuum button that when pushed operated the windshield washer water to spray and also activated the windshield wipers.  It is quite possible that a prior owner has made this button into a “kill switch” for the engines ignition system.  Verification should be quite easy to do.

 

From: Larry Pearson, SoCal Advisor:  The aluminum button in the center of the windshield wiper knob causes the windshield washer to activate and the windshield wiper motor to activate through a vacuum controlled timer mounted on top of the windshield wiper motor. If you pushed the button and the engine died, I suspect that a defective wiper motor grounded out the ignition at the ballast resistor, causing the engine to die. This may have caused a fuse to blow.
The windshield wiper motor gets its power from the same brown 18-gauge wire that connects to the ignition switch and powers the car's ignition through the ballast resistor located next to the wiper motor. They tie together through a screw connection on one end of the ballast resistor. First, make sure that the screw connection is tight. If it is, loosten the screw and remove the wire going to the wiper motor. Your car should now start and run. If it doesn't, check out the condition of the terminal on the end of the brown wire and make sure that 12 volts appears here when the ignition is turned on. Maybe the wire is broken at the terminal connection. I always felt that 18 gauge is too small for this much of a load with the wiper motor running in addition to the ignition load. Again, check for a blown fuse.
Good luck with this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi

I have a WCFB Carter carb that has been giving me fits.
I had it to National Carb twice and after $200 I still have the same
problem, does not feed enough fuel to get over 48 MPH
I have a steady stream of fuel from the third fuel pump,
gives me a quart in 40 seconds @ 5 lbs pressure.
I do not need to restore this carb just fix it....do you have
a reliable source for this type of repair
Thanks
Larry
Okeechobee FL

From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 
Larry,
 
I have never owned a dual carb set-up but the front carb is the primary and as such, my guess is that your low speed issues would be similar to the operation of the 1X4 Carter WCFB.
 
I had a similar issue with my 230 HP many years ago that turned out to be the accelerator pump in the front of the carb that wasn't lifting the metering rods. No matter how I feathered the gas pedal it wouldn't go over 45 MPH.
The metering rods & their lift linkage were sticking in a rebuilt carb that sat too long.
Cleaning the rods & an accelerator pump kit took care of the issue.
 
Look into joining the Sunshine State Chapte

r and talk to them about references to local shops who may specialize in adjusting & synchronizing dual quads.

 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

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I have purchased a 1959 corvette and the speedometer does not work at this time.  The odometer continue to register mileage but the speedometer needle does not move.  Are there some tricks that I can try before removing the speedometer and having it gone through.  I would love not to have to remove the dash and take the speedometer out.  Let me know if you have any ideas.   Kevin

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Other than a little Voodoo there is nothing that I can think of short of pulling the instrument housing out and having the speedometer rebuilt and you should have the tachometer rebuilt at the same time.  Good luck with your project as working upside down is not much fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yesterday the handle on my hood release cable pulled off. Is there a way to put it back on, in other words how is it attached to the cable? I tried to screw it back on but it pulled back off. Any information on this is much appreciated. I do not want to buy a new repro assembly as I hear they are junk made in China.

Tom

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Tom,
 
I had the same thing happen to my car.
Use a small pair of vice grips as an emergency release handle to get the hood up.
Your hood release handle was manufactured as die-cast over a knurled rod so you have a couple choices.
 
1) Push the handle back on using some of the newer two stage plastic weld adhesives on the market.
    Hold the shaft in the handle tightly in place while the adhesive cures.
    Drill a cross-hole as small as possible thru the handle & shaft, press a brad/nail into the hole, snip
    the sharp end off about 1/16 in and peen as a rivet.
Or
 
2) Buy the "correct" replacement that costs $110 instead of $80 for the cheap version.
    Check out Corvette Central P/N 461131 or Paragon Reproductions P/N 13828.
    Both are GM P/N 1990947
 
If you opt for the new cable, make sure you bend the cable wire ends to 30-40 degree angle just past the screw clamps after they are adjusted & tightened . This keeps the clamp from falling off, leaving you unable to open the hood without breaking something.
  
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

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DEAR SIRS,

COULD YOU TELL ME THE CORRECT HEAD BOLT MARKING ON A 1962 CORVETTE 327??? THANKS,

MIKE

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,
 
1959-1962 head bolts had a double circle headmark.
Check out Paragon Reproduction P/N 13661K.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi,

 My hood front pass side how do I adjust the latch it pops up driving?

Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  When my '54 had the same issue, I noted that the weld at the base of the post to the flange had some play. I had a welder tac weld it in 4 places and it made it rigid and it stayed down. Also, shut down from center, not the side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi
I have a 62 Corvette with a wiring problem. If my light switch is turned to illuminate the dash lights but not so far as to turn on the interior light then the dash lights stay on when the key is off and that draws down the battery. Turning the dimmer light switch completely clockwise (dash lights off) saves the battery. I tried a new switch but that did not fix the problem. I also checked the wiring diagram in my 62 Service Guide and the color codes/ connections appear correct. I saw however that the original and replacement light switch each have 8 possible connection positions but the car has only seven wires (also shown on the wiring diagram). Any suggestions

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Alan,
 
As I understand the function of the light switch,
 
With the knob pushed all the way in, only the courtesy light should turn on after the knob is rotated past the detent. Dash light dimmer function should be inactive because they should not be illuminated.
 
With the knob/shaft pulled out to the first detent position, the dash lights, parking lights , license plate light & tail lights should be on and then the dash light dimmer function should be active.
Rotating the knob should still activate the courtesy light.
 
With the knob/shaft pulled to the second detent position, head lights should be on, parking lights off, dash lights, license plate light & tail lights should be on, dash light dimmer function active.
Rotating the knob should still activate the courtesy light.

 
The light switch function should be independent of the ignition, whether on or off.
 
Operation other than what I have described would indicate to me that either the headlight switch is defective or that something is mis-wired.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

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I am trying to replace the trunk springs on my 58 to solve the sagging trunk lid issue but I can not figure how to remove them. After removing the bottom nut the lid can not be raised enough to remove the spring, is there a way to remove the top nut and would that help to remove the spring ?

Thanks,
Mike
 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Yes, cut a slot in flat washers as wide as the trunk spring rods. It will not be real easy, but use a large flat blade screw driver and lift the spring up. Insert a washer, one at a time. This will add tension or strength to the weaken springs. Probably 5 washers to start with. Too many will not allow the trunk lid to close (the spring will not have enough travel to collapse). To my knowledge, currently no one is producing a reproduction spring with enough strength to hold the lid up. It is a larger problem for '58 owners because of the boat straps on the trunk lid.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

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I have a 61 vette the motor was rebuilt and a 3/4 cam installed 20 years ago. when this was done an edlebrock intake and a holley 650 carb was installed . the air cleaner , the ingintion shield and the carb and intake were all thrown away.
Motor was built J140 car was built oct 16th 1960. Ok do you know if original ingnition shielding and air filter will fit?
they also changed out the powerglide for a 3 speed 400 but i have the power glide but it needs rebuilt. any idea of what a rebuilt one cost and is mine worth anything as a core or for rebuilding?
thanks
Bud
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The factory air cleaner will not fit on a Holly carburetor….the factory shielding will still fit but I assume that it also has all been thrown away. 1961 was the last year for the cast iron Powerglide transmission. Unless you really, really want to go back to the Powerglide I would recommend that you stick with the current transmission as it is more efficient and less costly to rebuild if need be. Quality transmission rebuilders for the old cast iron Powerglide transmissions are few and far between. Good luck with your project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a friend thinking of purchasing a 1958 Vette. The car is said to be an original Fuel Injected car but is now carburated. The original fuel injection is not available so he would like to know how he can tell if the car is truely an original Fuel Injected car. Someone told me long ago that there a mounting hole, for fuel injected cars only, inside the engine compartment, left inner fender that was for the fuel injection air cleaner. Is that true and is there other ways to identify a fuel injected car?
Also, can you tell me what the tachometer redline should be for all 1958 engine options?
I will be joining the Solid Axle Club as I have a 1959 and a 1962 Corvette and this forum is just what I need.
Thanks,
Dan

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Dan,
Simple questions, complex answers.
All 1958 Corvettes had either 5500 or 6500 RPM redline depending on HP.

5500 RPM tachometer was used for 230 HP base engine & 250 HP fuel injected. Both of these would have been generator drive tachometers.

A 6500 RPM tachometer w/ generator drive would have been used in the 270 HP.

The 6500 RPM tachometer w/ distributor drive was used on 290 HP fuel injected engines.

So, back to your first question, how do you tell if it was really a FI car?
There were 504 cars w/ 250 HP FI & 1007 cars with 290 HP FI and although both are fuel injected,
the distributors, generators and routing of the tachometer cables were different.
Tachometer routing for the 290 HP required a special hole thru the firewall ~halfway between the distributor & the steering column.

In addition to the 2 air cleaner mounting holes (w/ riveted support bracket behind), due to access issues, the WSW reservoir was moved from driver side to the passenger side area just forward of the battery. There should also be screw holes in the left inner fender for attachment of the air cleaner inlet air hose straps.

Good luck to your friend,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

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to sacctech


Must the canvas straps around the axle of a 1962 Corvette be in place for shipping on a follow along trailor?

Thank you

Larry

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The canvass straps that you refer to on this 1962 are rebound straps to control the car if it were to go over a significant bump in the road and keeps the rear tires in contact with the road. They have nothing to do with the chains that you refer to as these are in place to keep the car intact with the trailer as it is being towed down the road.

C1s are transported all over the country with the rebound straps in place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi,

Can you help with the following

1. Can you recommend tires for this car, with standard 5" rims and body height.
Are there well regarded options for bias ply 670x15 and radials P205/75R15 that you could recommend. Would like to avoid rubbing under fenders

2. For international membership, is it possible to have a reduced annual fee if the magazine is received by email rather than post.

Thank you

Warren from New Zealand

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Warren,

You can put Coker American Classic 205-75R15 tires on your stock rims all the way around to get wider tires, radial performance and a stock appearance all in the same package w/o affecting your speedometer. That's what I would recommend.
They are available from Corvette Central as well as other outlets.

If you really want bias-ply tires, Corvette Central also sells reproduction Firestone, BF Goodrich & US Royal 6.70-15 tires that would be correct for your 1959. (Goodyear bias-ply tires were not available on Corvette until 1961). Just keep in mind that bias-ply tires are more for looks than for driving.

Regarding the overseas dues cost & e-mail of the quarterly club magazine "On Solid Ground", that is above my pay grade but those responsible are aware of your question.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

Website editor's note:  The club's award winning quarterly magazine is in print form only.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  P205/75R15s are perfect for your application which give you the correct ride height….depending on your preference there are many different manufacturers with equally different sidewall appearances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What are the production quantities for each body color for 1958 Corvettes?
How many 290hp were made?

thanks,

Bob

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bob,

The answer to your questions & more is available in "Corvette Black Book" by author Mike Antonick.
Every Corvette owner needs one. It is updated yearly & can be purchased from any of the major Corvette parts vendors.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

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Hi,
 
I recently purchased the captioned car which is a Top Flight body off restored car.  I have not yet joined your club, but seriously looking into it.  This is Corvette #9 for me, but my first C1....I love it! 
 
My question is with respect to the soft top.  I live in Florida and my vehicle is always parked in the garage.  I keep the soft top securely fastened with both the back latches and front latches, but is it necessary to keep the back latches secured while parked?  When I go for my weekly ten mile drive through the country, I always have the soft top lowered to enjoy the ride.  I want to ensure that I do things correct so any assistance that you can provide would be very much appreciated.  I also heard something about rolling up a towel and putting it into the crease of the plastic window when I lower the top as not to damage the window...is this true or just a myth?
 
Thanks again,
 
Gordon

From: Brad Bean,  Vice President of SACC:  I too live in FL and like to take drives, esp. in the spring and fall. If your top is really taut, some owners like to undo the rear latches, when the car is garaged, to reduce chances of separating at the seams. However, if the top is not too tight and the garage is not temperature controlled, I like to keep the rear latches fastened so the vinyl remains taut and wrinkle free.

No myth regarding the rolled up towel in the crease of the rear window, when in the down position. The clear plastic scratches easily and this helps to minimize the wear. It also keeps the pointed stainless trim tips from penetrating the top when folded. Word of caution... make sure towel is not too thick as to cause stress on the metal frame joints; ovet time this could bend the frame.

I encourage you to join both SACC & the Sunshine State chapter of SACC. Most of these people have forgotten more about these cars than I will ever know.

Enjoy your new purchase!

Brad Bean

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Would you know where I might buy a Hardtop shipping box. I would appreciate any info you have.
Thank You
Lee

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Lee,
I would contact http://www.thehardtopshop.com/ or call them at 724-457-0680 for information on the size box required to ship a hardtop. After they fix them, they then ship them all over the USA.

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC
 

 

 

 

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Same holds true for "The Glassworks" in the Pittsburg, PA area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 Two more simple questions: it is a fuelie car, but has carb, has a dual point distro not a fuelie one but from what i was told it is part of a GM kit that folks got back in the day to retro the fuel since no one knew how to setup for the changing season here in the east coast. I pulled the wires, they were clear and brittle and can see they were correct lengths and all, but Igot some Napa ones,  and well no power now, they were for sure solid copper wires.   Any ideas where to get the correct ones for a 60 fuel dual point setup?
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Adviser:  Correct length and style of spark plug wires are readily available from Paragon Corvette Reproductions or Corvette Central. These wire sets are manufactured by Electric Limited. 1960 Corvette spark plug wires were not dated. Fuel injected and carburetor Corvettes all used the same spark plug wires.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Wayne,
If you really have a Cascade Green 1960 big brake fuelly, please be very careful that you don't damage it or change anything until you have it professionally appraised.

As for spark plug wires for it, all 1960 Corvettes used the same wires regardless of horsepower.
They should be available from any of the major Corvette parts vendors to get GM Restoration Parts.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

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How does one remove the 3 side spears. also does anyone know if any of the backer place for all three, the visible one was ever chrome? I have a set on know that are painted over and well they are chrome underneath...

Looks like the wheel well cover may need to be unbolted and rich up in there? I can see the 3 long end nuts....

thank you
Wayne

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:  Wayne,

If you are referring to the three horizontal side spears in the cove, the speed nuts that fasten them are located behind the kick panels inside the car.
What you are seeing behind the splash pan are the speed nuts that fasten the crossed-flag emblems.

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

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Missing Cover: I'm doing my first oil change on my recently acquired 1959 and upon removal of the oil filter I noticed there is no cover over the flywheel (picture attached). This appears to be the "flywheel housing extension". Are these known to fall off? I'm concerned that I may have driven without this in place and allowed debris to enter the housing. What would you recommend I should do to be sure I won't damage anything if I just replace the cover? Can you point me to the right size bolts for installing a new one and any other tips you might want to add such as proper seals, gaskets etc.? Thanks!
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Adviser:  No gaskets are required and the piece is available from any of the large restoration stores. You will have to remove the starter as this shield gets sandwiched between the starter housing and the bell housing. It is attached by four ¼ x 20 recessed hex head bolts with a captured external lock washer. These are the same style bolts that attach the oil pan to the engine and also available from reproduction sources. The picture indicates that your Corvette’s engine oil filter has been converted to a “spin on style.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello,

I'm putting a little '60 Vette back together and I was installin a new throwout bearing tonight and couldn't get the fork back on right. Is there a trick to it. The fork doesn't have enough play to slip past the rounded knob that the clip is supposed to hold on to.   Randy

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter Advisor:  Randy,

How did you get the clutch fork out ?? Whatever you did, try the reverse on re-assembly.

If that doesn't work, try backing the clutch fork pivot ball stud out of the bell housing to see if it will give you the clearance to install the fork, then re-torque. Otherwise, .............

Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi, I own an original '67 big block that I have owned since I got out of high school in 1970, however my problem is with my wife's 1960, which she drives regularly in the summer. I gave her the car as a wedding gift 33 years ago.
It is a 3 speed.
Problem was last year or so the clutch wasn't disengaging properly, and you would get grinding going first to 2nd and 2nd to 3rd. The pedal was at the top and no adjustment left.
I put in a new clutch, pressure plate and throw out bearing, which were all the same size as the ones i replaced, unfortunately I can't get enough adjustment.
If I adjust the clutch rod so I get pedal then the throw out bearing rests right on the pressure plate( I know this is a no no), if I adjust so bearing is off the pressure plate I don't get enough clutch to shift properly. The grommet where the pedal rod hooks up was worn out so I turned down an insert to tighten this area up, it didn't seem like this grommet could add that much to the clutch adjustment.
The pedal/clutch is all the way at the end of the pedal.
 Obviously something is wrong but I don't know what.
Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks:

Paul
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Paul,
If your wife has been driving this car summers for 33 years, take another good look at the wear & elongated holes In all the clutch linkages. 
Inspect the clutch fork ball in the bell housing, the clutch fork where it contacts the ball, the holes where the push rod attaches to the fork, the pin hole in the push rod, the push rod pin and both pivot balls for the Z bracket. While you are giving it the attention it needs, you might want to add a grease fitting to the Z bracket tube and some felt packing around the pivot balls to keep the grease contained. 
 
Taking all the slack out of the system and proper lubrication should increase the adjustment available. 
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC


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Looking for info on what was the power train that came with my '60.
ref:Serial #100. I know is was a 283, but at what level?
The 1st owner, I have His name (*), bought the Vette 24 Dec. 1959.
Nice Christmas gift for someone !!

Also would like to find out how many owned My Vette before Me.
I may be the 4th ?
 JOHN
 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter: 

John,
As one of our newest members, welcome to SACC.
 
VIN #00867S100100 tells us nothing except that it is the 100th 1960 Corvette built in St Louis.
Any additional information has to be determined from studying the car itself.
 
You have to look for clues as to which RPO's were installed in the car originally.
Things like which tachometer, WSW reservoir location, mounting holes under the hood with nothing attached, generator, starter & distributor P/N's.
Your car is early enough that it should have a copper/brass radiator regardless of engine option but it may have a 4 blade fan or a 5 blade clutched fan. 
They are all important clues as to the original engine, if it was replaced.
If it is original, the engine # will tell you what it is.
 
Regarding previous owners, check with your state DMV.
In Michigan, they will check the records for $15-$20 a name.
 
Good luck with your search,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

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How to install speedometer cable in 1959 corvette . Thank you

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ron,
 
I'm going to make an assumption here that you already disconnected the transmission end of the speedometer cable casing and unsuccessfully tried to pull the cable out.
There is a collar around the cable in the small ferrule at the end attached to the speedometer that keeps the cable properly located in the cable housing.
To replace the cable, disconnect the small ferrule from the back of the speedometer, note/document how the speedometer cable assembly is routed under the instrument cluster and thru the firewall, then pull it out. SAVE THE GROMMET, you may need it later.
Also note the cable assembly routing from the firewall down to the transmission, then remove it.
 
Replace it with the correct length replacement assembly that can be purchased from most Corvette parts vendors. '59s are steel case with different lengths depending on whether the car has 3 speed,
4 speed T-10, 4 speed Muncie, or Powerglide transmission.
Be sure the new cable is properly lubed.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

Thanks , but my problem is that I can't get my hand under the dash to disconnect the speedometer cable .

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ron,
 
Sure you (or your mechanic) can.
Get a light, lay on your back with your head directly under the instrument cluster and look for the access that allows your fingers to turn the knurled ferrule nut.
You may have to push some wiring out of the way but I've done it dozens of times since 1968.
Lay a piece of cardboard over the lower seat frame so you don't tear your shirt or your back on the seat track attachment screw sticking up out of the frame.
 
Good luck.
Bill Huffman  
 

 

 

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Dear Sir,

Firstly I would like to confirm my desire to become a member of the solid axle corvette club and would like to know how I can do this.

 I am from western Australia and have just stumbled across the club in conversation with someone.

I have 4 corvettes, including a 1960 270HP corvette and would like to know which configuration my aluminium tank top radiator would have come in to confirm my car is correct. My Vin number is 00867S101617 and the engine number is dated F1208CU, which is December, so I am assuming my car is an early car produced in around January 1960? Hoping you can confirm this as well.

I am wondering if my car would have had the ribbed tank top with the sight hole or if it would have had the flat tank top with no sight hole. I would like to get confirmation so I can ensure this is correct as the car has been subject to a body off restoration and is in extremely nice condition. It may be that both types may have been in use at this time, but that is not clearly documented anywhere I have tried to find this information.

I am planning a holiday to the USA and need to place my order by tomorrow, so if I can get a response to this query, it would be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks in advance for your help.

 John

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

John,
 
Welcome to the Solid Axle Corvette Club.
Joining is as easy as clicking on the Membership & Application link (the 4th link above Technical Help), filling it out and sending it and a check to the address noted.

Your engine number indicated a 270 HP Corvette engine assembled in Flint on 8 Dec 1959.
It must have been built early and shipped fast because VIN # 00867S101617 is a car built in St Louis early in the second week of December. First Dec build was #1454 and last was #2059.
 
I can't answer your question regarding the tank top.
Both my '60s are early & both have copper/brass radiators.
However, because of where it is located and since there are not many old Corvettes in Australia, unless you imported it recently, I would assume that if it fits and appears original, it probably is.
The November/December/January time period had several changes going on.
   Transition from all copper to Copper or aluminum, based on application.
   Transition of VIN plate from driver door jam to steering column.
   Transition from engine number like yours to one incorporating the last digits of VIN #. 
As a consequence, stuff happened.
 
Good luck with your restoration,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

Hi,

 I have a 1954 corvette in need of a top is pinpoint vinyle the correct type?

 Thanks,

Bob

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Bob,
   No, the correct top is beige canvas. It can be found and purchased in Texas at  alknochinteriors.com

 

Bruce Fuhrman 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1960 corvette but it has 1961 sill plates.  I am going to install the correct sill plates but the old holes for the small step plate are not visible.  How do I correctly position the small step sill plate since no old holes are visible?  Woodge

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Woodge,
 
Lift & remove the seat cushions and the seat backs from the seat frames and set them aside.
That will give you access to the underside of where the small dimpled step plates are mounted.
Depending how the holes were filled, you may find hardened filler stalactites hanging down below the surface. This is exactly the same thing you would be looking for to find cove moulding holes that somebody had filled in on the door.
You may be able to use the seat frame a fulcrum to force the filler up out of the filled holes in the fiberglass. Or, you may have to remove the seat frame to get better access.   
The filler doesn't have to be pushed up out of the holes, just enough to show where they are located.
Then use a really small diameter punch, so you don't enlarge the holes, to drive the filler down thru.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Good Morning Sirs: My 1961 is being repainted following an accident and the painter wants to know if the inside of the trunk was originally black, or speckled. Could you please advise if it was speckled, was it light, medium or dark grey and if possible what the paint code was. Feel free to contact me with any questions you may have or to let me know how I may be of service. I look forward to hearing from you.
Regards, David

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  David

All 1961 Corvette trunks ( and the trunk lid bottom as well as the convertible top well and deck lid bottom) were painted body color. Note that the paint in these areas was not as glossy as the body because the factory prep was not very good nor were these areas polished out.

Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello
Can the radiator in a 1962 Corvette be removed without removing the fan shroud?
Thank you for any help you can give me.
Best regards,
Bob

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor: 

Bob,
 
In my experience, the radiator can not be removed without removing the fan shroud because it is almost impossible to access the lower hose for removal ( and re installation) from the radiator. In addition, the outlet at the bottom of the radiator will not clear the right lower portion of the shroud unless you modify/cut it. I always take the hood off too just to make access easier.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

I just recently found your site and posted a question which you answered in just one day.  The solution offered did the trick. I wanted to say thanks and let you know I have sent my membership app in.  Honest the check is in the mail!
I now have another question which I would like some help on.  The 62 vett that I own, I believe it to be a numbers matched car, iIt still has the serial number plat riveted to the column , it matches the block number along with the transmission number etc, etc. My problem is I just can’t find out much about the car.  I purchased it about 21 years ago while in California from a very well known vet. dealer (they are still in business) with the original black plates on it.  I had it shipped back east and at the time was to ignorant to ask for any documentation, I just wanted to get it back and drive it.  I would like to learn more about it but don’t really know where to start to do my home work.  The serial number is 20867S101111.

Any suggestions on how to go about finding more about the car?
Curious George


PS Thanks to all who contribute to this site. You are a wonderful resource .
 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

George,
 
Since I live in California I will try to answer your question. California DMV keeps records on cars for only about 3 years after they are no longer currently registered in Ca. So unless your car is still registered in Ca. on the black plates DMV will be no help.......and even if it was the records would probably show only your name going back a few years.
 
I would suggest contacting the dealer .......they may be able to help. Also, I would place ads in the NCRS Driveline, On Solid Ground and the S. California SACC newsletter The Solid Scoop under info wanted with a good description of the car and details of the purchase. It has only been 21 years........someone is likely to remember your car.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

Hi ,
 
 Is the tach cable for a 1961 black or grey? All the reproduction suppliers list it as being grey. All the pictures I've seen of original engine compartments the cable sure looks like it's black.
 
My rear axle housing appears to be original (has mounts for strut rods, etc.). The casting numbers are L 561, 3725899, GM with a T over a 2. The casting number seems to be correct, it is non-posi. The date appears to be December 5th, 1961. My car is a late 61, 110063. The stamped code looks like BB1221. The first B is very faint, but the second B is very legible. The 1221 I believe is December 21st. But the BB doesn't seem close to any axle codes for 61s or 62s. Any help would be appreciated.
 
Thanks, Mike

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,
 
According to the NCRS 1961-62 judging manual, all 61 tach cables for non FI motors were black vinyl covered and driven off the generator.. FI tach cables were steel cased and driven off the distributor.
 
The read end you have is not original to your car. Based on your info, it came from a 1961 passenger car. BB indicates V8, 3 speed or 6 cyl, powerglide...........3.36 ratio, non posi.
 
Regarding the dates on the rear end......your 61 was built on June 28 so the casting date should be May or early June 1961 with an assembly date in the first half of June. Of course there are exceptions to this, but if you look for a correctly dated rear end, this is a good guideline to follow.
 

 

**********

I have a 59 all original Vet but I am not sure where to look
for the engine number,  I have manifold numbers but I do not
think they have a value.
Thanks
Larry

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Larry,
 
The engine number should be F(Flint) Mo & Day of assembly (ex. 1023 for Oct 23) plus two letter suffix (CQ,CR,CS,CT,CU, DG) depending on HP & transmission option.
Corvettes engines were not stamped with the VIN number until mid-1960 model year.
 
This number can be found on the stamp pad at the front of the engine just forward of the passenger side head. It may be hidden under the fuel pump to carburetor fuel line.
 
The intake part number & date code are important if your car is really "original".
The part number should match the HP application noted in the engine code and the casting date code (A thru L for Jan-Dec and numerical date, 1-31) must pre-date the car manufacturing date.
 
 
Good luck with your investigation,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

I have a 1960 with dual quads, 245 Hp engine.  I bought it about 7 years ago and I do not know the history of the car.  Ever since I purchased the car it would overheat when I drove it with external temps much above 85 degrees.  Below that external temperature the engine temp would run above 180 degrees, probably 195 or so.  On warm days I can let it idle in the driveway and the engine temp will continue to climb.   I checked all of the usual things, fluid levels, coolant mix, I flushed the system, did a pressure check, changed the thermostat and nothing seems to help.  I checked the sender and temp gauge with my IR temp meter and they appear to be accurate.  Also, you can watch the temperature gauge and it will climb to 180 degrees (the temp of the thermostat) and it will hold there for a while and then it will begin to slowly climb.  I know that it is either an air flow or a water flow problem. 

 The water pump had a slight leak, so I decided to change that.  I am in the process of buying a matching numbers water pump but there is an issue there.  The pump that I took off was not a matching numbers pump, it was an aftermarket pump and it had been rebuilt.  On that pump, the distance from the pulley hub flange to the mounting surface of the pump was 5 5/8 inches.  The matching numbers pump that I received had a dimension of 5 ¾ inches, so the pulleys did not line up.  I did a little research and from what I can find, this dimension should be 5 5/8 like the one that I took off.  Is this correct?

 I am also addressing the air flow issue as well.  I read in the Corvette forums that overheating is a common problem.  Some people have improved it by eliminating the gaps between the radiator and fan shroud.  I have sealed that up by flattening a length of 5/8 inch heater hose and pushing it in the gap between the shroud and the radiator (this actually looks like it belongs there) and I have blocked off the square hole on the lower right fan shroud.  Now more of the air that the fan draws should flow through the radiator.  I am still waiting for the water pump before I can tell if I have improved the situation.

 I am thinking of the next step if this does not solve the problem.  This engine has the 4 blade fan directly mounted to the water pump pulley.  I noticed that there are two versions of the 4 blade fan, one up to ’57 and one after ’57.  I am not sure which one I have, how can I tell which one I have and what is the difference between these two?  Would this be part of the problem if I had the wrong one?  Should I consider switching to the 5 blade fan with the fan clutch?

 Thanks for any help that you can provide.

 Don

There is one more question that I forgot to ask that I hope you can pass along.  My car has the “conventional” copper brass radiator like the one shown below.  I am finding conflicting  information with regards to what radiator cap should be used, a 7 Lb. or 13 Lb.  The car came with a 7 Lb. cap, changing to the 13 Lb. cap did not change the overheating problem.

 Thanks,

Don

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Don,
It's good that you asked the second question because that would have been my first question back to you.  1960's came with both copper & aluminum.
Early ones appear to be all copper while later ones had copper for 230 HP base engine & aluminum w/ overflow tank for 245, 270 & 290 HP engines.
 
Copper radiator should have the 7 psi cap and all engines had a 170 degree thermostat.
The 13 psi cap would cause the engine to run a little warmer due to the pressure differential.
 
The 230 HP base engine had a 4 blade fan that was riveted.
The 245, 270 & 290 HP engines had 5 blade clutched fans.
 
Regarding the correct length for the water pump shaft, I would address that question to either
John Pirkle at Masters City Corvette Parts in Augusta, GA or Ron Burke at ChevyCool in Scottsdale, AZ.
That's what they do for a living and they both do it well.
 
Regarding the 5/8 hose between radiator & shroud, a properly installed shroud shouldn't  have that much clearance. However, in early Dec 1959 , at approx. VIN #1600, they added weather strip to the front underside of the hood to seal off airflow between the hood & the radiator. Adding that (and all the other radiator seals that are supposed to be there) would certainly help.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

**********

Hi
I have a 62 corvette with a rear light problem. Changing the signal light position turns on and off the brake lights when I hold the brake down. I can find a position about mid way between up and down on the turn signal when the brake lights work and another slightly up or down where just the drivers side works. When either signal side is active the brake on that side is off (not sure if that is the way it was designed to work). I have done the following without success : replaced the rear wiring harness, replaced the turn signal harness (twice), ran separate ground wire for the rear harness,and ran a separated fuel tank ground wire. I only succeeded in stopping my fuel Gage movement when the lights were activated.

 Thanks for your Help

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  This is a frequent problem with C1 Corvettes although most of my experience has been with 58-62s.  The first area of concern is usually the turn signal harness as all electrical to the rear of the car runs through this switch with the exception of the gas tank sender.  You have an all too typical grounding problem since you have already replaced the turn signal switch and the rear harness.  Your problem probably lies with the rear tail light socket to housing ground as this connection becomes corroded overtime.  I drill a very small hole between the tail light housing where it meets the tail light socket and screw in a small sheet metal screw between the two.  This will create a proper ground for the tail light housing and the tail light socket.  Since we are dealing with a fiberglass car grounds are very important for proper electrical function.  Good luck with this problem but this should solve it for you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Alan,
 
Although grounding could be a problem, my guess is that your canceling cam assembly is worn out ( you did not indicate that you replaced it) and/or your turn signal cup is loose.
 
Chip Werstein 

 

 

 

 

**********

I think I need to rebuild my steering box.

My first concern is what are the steps I need to take to remove the steering box?

 

Jack

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  All C1 owners should a have copy of the Corvette Servicing Guide ST-12 on hand at all times.  Chapter 9 gives a very complete detail of servicing the C1 steering box and how to remove and install the unit.  Good luck with this project as all the rebuild components are available from the Corvette reproduction parts suppliers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello gentlemen!                                                                                     5/15/14
 
I have a 57 Corvette.  I have owned it since 1977!  The fan should was missing so I ordered one from Paragon.
It will not install properly.  When you view the photos in Nolan Adams' Corvette Restoration book, , it is noted that the upper shroud was installed to the lower shroud before the body drop.
 
This replacement shroud will not install as it should.  So............my question is this:  Should I loosen all the body bolts again to raise the car up enough so that the upper shroud bolts correctly to the core support, or am I missing something?  I hate to re shim the whole car again, just to get the upper shroud to fit.
 
Thanks for all your help!!!
 
 
Bill

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bill,
 
If I understand your question correctly, you bought a 20 year old previously wrecked 1957 Corvette that didn't have a fan shroud assembly but was "drivable". 30 some years later you decided to do a frame off restoration.   The body is now re-bolted tightly to the frame and in trying to complete the car, the fan shroud won't bolt up.
 
Simple question, complicated answer.
 
The body from firewall rearward is supported by the frame.
Shimming is to minimize body twist so the doors, deck lid & trunk are supported and fit correctly.
 
The body from firewall forward is supported by the radiator support which is supported by the front crossmember. The fan shroud actually defines the angle between the radiator support and the front horns of the frame.
 
The hood hinges attach directly to the radiator support. That, within the hinges adjustment limits, 
determines the hood height & position. The front end can be raised or lowered to match the body height to the front of the hood. 
 
If the doors, deck lid and trunk open & close properly and the edges are uniform, leave the body bolts/shims as is.  If not, loosen them for re-shimming later.
 
Remove the hood.
 
Loosen the two radiator support to front crossmember bolts.
 
Loosen the radiator support to inner fender bolts on each side.
  (They should have a large fender washer under the bolt head)
 
Loosely attach all the fan shroud attachment hardware.
 
After all the fasteners are installed,
start re-assembly by tightening the fan shroud to both the frame & radiator support.
Reattach the hood.
Raise the front end to match the hood and re-tighten the inner fender attaching bolts.
 
Retighten the radiator support to front crossmember bolts.
(NOTE- some re-shimming may be required between radiator support & front crossmember) 
 
If it still won't line up, there may be frame distortion from a previous accident that never got fixed.
It's possible that's why your car didn't have a fan shroud when you bought it.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Hi I was wondering if you happen to know where I can get a gasket rebuild kit for the original 3 speed transmission that came with a 1961 base model (230hp). I found the rebuild kits for the 4 speed but not for the 3 speed. Thank you!

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ryan,

If you haven't already done so, call (instead of looking in the catalog) the usual Corvette parts vendors and ask for a Saginaw 3 speed manual rebuild kit. Low volume items are not always in the catalog.

If Corvette Central, Paragon Reproductions, Chicago Corvette or 4 Speeds by Darrell in Vermillion, IL can't get you one, try a local  transmission repair shop or Chevy dealer. If you brought it in for repair, they would find you one.

The question I have for you is, do you really drive a car with a non-synchromesh 1st gear?  The reason parts are hard to find is that most owners convert them to 4 speed for drivability. Unless you have an absolutely original museum car, value should not be adversely affected by making it easier to drive.

Good luck in your search,                                                                                                                            Bill Huffman,                                                                                                                                                  President,  Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Hello:

I am trying to replace the front brake drums on my 58, but they will not separate from the hub. The corvette servicing guide says the drum is held to the hub by three rivets which must be removed to replace the drum. Are these rivets available and if not where would I go to have them replaced?

Thanks
Mike
 

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,
 
Except for maybe "proving originality" the rivets aren't needed at all.
5 studs & lug nuts hold the drum & hub assembly together.
Not replacing the rivets will have no effect on your car's drivability.
 
Good luck with your project,
Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

Dear SACC,

If the assembly plate is missing to install restored original horns, does it require removing the hood and radiator to access this area to rivet on the assembly plate to the inner skirt fiberglass underbody?

And if I do not want to work with my head upside down, I would also need to remove the motor?

Thank you,

Eric

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor:  While no job is impossible it is my opinion that life will be much better for you to remove the hood for easier access to your particular problem as space before the radiator is very limited.  Good luck with this impending task at hand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Here is the car-1962 was originally a carb car-converted to fuelie in 1987
The injection is a 1961-runs like a top .My question is what is the solenoid on the front of the engine
it has a vacuum line connected to the cranking sensor and vacuum advance. The car starts -will not idle
runs rich. I discounted that solenoid car runs like a top.I know that this is a modification someone placed there.
Is it needed? Should I get rid of it? replace it ? or forget it and drive the car. I think it is connected to a battery cut off
installed as part of an old pager alert security system. The Gentleman I purchased the car from owned it for 27 years
and is just not a mechanic and can not give me any information. The car originally came from California. The car is really
a driver for me-and my hope is it remains in my family for many years. A old love affair and distant dream now my reality
                Any help will  be great I will send pics.
                     John

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Technical Advisor:  The “Achilles Heel” for Rochester fuel injection units from 1958-1963 was the cold start cranking signal valve.  When this valve would fail and not close the fuel injection unit would run extremely rich and not idle.  This valve is currently available either brand new or rebuilt from Jim Thorpe, 563-359-7863 and sells for around $140.00.  This valve is also available from other fuel injection parts suppliers.  The purpose of this valve was to supply cranking engine manifold vacuum to the main control diaphragm for starting only.  As soon as the engine started and manifold vacuum to the valve was 3 inches or more it was to have closed off.  Failure to close itself off would cause over rich conditions and no idle quality.  If your engine will cold start without the need for the valve then don’t replace it but if cold starts are difficult then you should replace the valve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a completely rebuilt starter installed on my 1961 Corvette.  When I turn the ignition from the “start” position back to the “on” position the starter continues running.  What ideas do you have?
-David

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  I had a similar problem on a 62 Corvette that I was restoring.  The starter that I took out worked just fine but “how many of us have said no let’s get it rebuilt”!  Well “Murphy’s Law struck and the starter did the same thing as yours….it would not disengage and just kept cranking even with the key turned off.  I took it back to the rebuilder and they “forgot” to replace the some inexpensive parts in the bendix drive system of the starter housing end case.  The end of the bendix drive has a retainer, snap ring and thrust collar.  The thrust collar and snap ring were worn out and once they were replaced everything worked just fine again.  Reference a 1968 Motors Auto Repair Manual, page 167 for more more information and have your bendix drive replaced or serviced and this will solve your problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

How do I remove and replace side cove trim on my 1956 corvette please? Thanks!

Jim

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

The procedure for cove trim removal & replacement is the same for 1956-1961.

Roll the windows all the way up,  Remove the door release knob, window regulator handle and

door lock lever,

Remove the door pull on '58-61,

Remove the door panel,

Remove the two inner door access covers,

Loosen the nut, star washer & flat washer from all the trim attachment studs inside the door,

Loosen the 2 nuts, star washers & flat washers at he front edge of each door. 

If the trim hasn't already separated from the door, rotate the stud CCW to release the head of the stud from the trim.  New door trim is available or you can have the old refurbished.

 To re-install, reverse the process.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

I have a 1962 340hp. I know it is supposed to be timed at 10 degrees btdc. The tab looks like the attachment below. Could you explain to my how to read this and what notch on the tab I would use as a point of reference for 10btdc.
Thank you for you time and consideration.


Bart
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Each line on the tab represents 2 degrees of timing so that five lines from the 0 line to the A line would be 10 degrees BTDC.  Obviously this is a reproduction timing cover tab so be sure to line up the 0 mark with the groove in the harmonic balancer when you attach it to the timing cover….JB weld works great for this application and use the five minute brand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I was going to take my original 62 out of winter moth balls this week.  Started it up and the car lurched forword even though I had the clutch in.  I put the car in neutral and she cranked up just fine.  However I could not put it in any gear with the engine running.  With the engine off I could move thru the gears except reverse.  I have had this car for over twenty years and have not had one problem with it up until now.  Any thoughts on what the problem maybe or/how I could possibly fix it ?

Any help is appreciated,
George

From: Larry Pearson: SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I have this same problem with my 1960 Corvette and 1949 Plymouth from time to time. especially after not driving the cars for several months, or years.  Your clutch disc has bonded itself to the flywheel.  The solution is to break it loose.  With the clutch pedal depressed to the floor and the parking brake hard on and your right foot hard on the brake pedel, put the transmission in high gear and see if applying the starter can break it loose.  This always works for me.  The problem should not reocurr once you break the clutch loose from the flywheel and start using the car.  During the winter storage, rust probably formed on the flywheel and caused the clutch disc to stick to it. Clutch discs are made or a porous material that can absorb moisture from the air and cause the rusting.  If the problem continues to reocurr, or the above procedure doesn't free it, you will have to remove the clutch and clean everything.  Maybe you need a new clutch disc.
 
Larry Pearson

**********

I am not a member of the Solid Axle Organization but hoping you can give me some guidance.  I currently own a C-3 Corvette which I've had since 1992 but my favorites have always been the C-1's.  I'm at the point in my life where I can afford a C-1 and have narrowed my search down to the 1960 with the 283/245 horsepower or the 283/270 horsepower.  Can you please advise of the pros and cons of these power plants and reliability?  
 
 
                                          Thanks
 
                                          Sparky
                                          Pa.   

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Sparky,
 
The only major difference between these 2 motors is the camshaft........the 270hp is a solid lifter cam with a lumpy idle and may require occasional lifter adjustment. The 245hp is nothing more than a base 230 hp motor with dual quads and has a smooth idle. Both engines are very streetable, reliable and easy to drive. I prefer the 270 because I like the lumpy idle and solid lifter sound.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

I cannot fill my tires because the stems are not quite long enough.  Do any of the companies like Ecklers or Corvette Central sell extenders?  I have seen generic versions but they appear to be for big SUVs and are too large.  Robert

From: Bill Hufman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Most tire stores (Discount Tire, Belle Tire, Sears, etc.) and auto parts outlets (Auto Zone, Advance Parts, NAPA Stores, etc.) will sell you valve stem extenders.
 
Probably more appropriately, there are usually three different stem lengths in two different seal diame