Technical Help from the Solid Axle Corvette Club

 

 

To submit a technical question regarding a 1953 to 1962 Corvette, simply email 
  jhollada@casscomm.com.   In the subject box you need to put "sacctech/ (your SACC
membership number)".  Example: sacctech/1234
If you are not a member, your question will not be excluded, however, it won't get priority.

Disclaimer:
Our officers enjoy answering questions about your Corvette. Please keep in mind before asking questions that we are not qualified or certified to diagnose problems you may be experiencing with your Corvette. It is recommended that an A.S.E. (Automotive Service Excellence) certified automotive technician diagnose the vehicle for you. This way you get an accurate diagnoses on the problem and an understanding of the parts necessary to remedy the problem

Keep in mind that members enjoy a wealth of information via the SACC quarterly magazine, On Solid Ground.  Here are some of the topics contained in the Spring, 2008 issue:

-Insulate Your Solid Axle

-1956 Goodyear Corvette

-Harmonic Balancer Re-Install

-Six Cylinder Corner

-Will We Need NOS Engine Oil for out Old Cars?

-The Willet Run Garage

-The Marketplace - Member Classified

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I am helping a friend with his frame off. Dropped the body on today. How do you determine what body shims are needed.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Nice to see that you helped your friend with the restored body off restoration, however, now is not the time to determine the number of shims that the “factory” used.  This should have been documented when the body was REMOVED from the frame.  I assume this was not done so now it is a matter of tightening up the body mount bolts and observing how the gaps of the doors and deck lid/trunk are coming out to be.  Adding or removing shims to accomplish the fit and finish will be trial and error.  Patience will now be required….good luck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gentlemen, I have a question regarding the axle's on my 1962 Corvette #6728. I have a posi-track rear axle and the wheel flanges on the axle shafts are bent, making the rear wheels wobble slightly.  I have a par of non-posi-track axle shafts (both the same length) out of a '58 model and I was wondering if they will fit my '62?  I've heard yes and no's on the subject, I've been asked about tooth count and shaft length as some say one is longer than the other, and about open and closed pumpkins so I'll refer my question to you professionals.  What's the real story.
Dave

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Yet another question about axles and positraction third members.  Axles from 58-62 C1s are the same length regardless of whether they came from a positraction axle housing or a non positraction axle housing. However they ARE NOT the same length as the driver’s side is slightly shorter than the passenger side.  Positraction axle bearings are stronger than non posi traction axle bearings but either will fit into any rear axle housing, posi or not.  Also posi axle bearings had two oil seals rather than just one for the nonposi.  Posi axle housings had built in anti gear oil slosh damns in the housing so that gear oil would stay in the carrier during hard turns on the race track.  Posi rear axle housings had a different differential vent than nonposi housings, posi housings having a vent tube vs a stove pipe for the nonposi housings.  There has been some controversy about posi and non posi axle lengths.  Some posi axles have been seen with a very thin spacer at the axel flange.  I have never had any problem putting axles from nonposi or posi into either rear axle housing.

 

 

 

 

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I just bot a 58 that is going to get a frame-off, then go for top flight.
 
I have done 3 top flight midyears but this is my first solid axle.
 
I think that I should consider joining since you guys have a lot of knowledge that I will need.
 
What's the membership process?
 
My first question is with regard to the differential. My car is non posi. Can I just replace the 3rd member with a posi 3.70 to accomplish this? Do I need new axles? I understand that mine will not have the oil baffles inside. Thanks.

From: Doug Prince: SoCal Chapter Advisor:  A 3:70 posi third member will physically drop right in.  Non posi axles will not have the stronger axle bearing that the posis came with and the bearing also had a double lip seal.  You rear end housing will not have the baffles nor will it have the correct vent line that posi traction rear end housings had.  The vent line can easily be added to the non posi rear end housing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi guys, I have a dilemma about what to do with my 57 corvette. I have a one owner car that has always been taken care of and driven to only 62 thousand miles, its not a restored vehicle just loved and cared for by its first owner. my problem is how much cleaning up can I or should I do to this car, it is a true  survivor and I don’t want to do anything to change that. the car does have a 56 year old 62 thousand mile frame and undercarriage and I was going to do so cleaning ,surface rust removal,and painting of the frame in the name of preservation. I have detailed many frames and engines on many cars including corvettes however on this car I will be the care giver until such time as I must pass it on to someone else. I do not want to be the guy everyone says why did you do that. I do plan to do anything I do to the original  specs. I just cant see how doing as much restoration to the frame as one can do with out removing the body will be worse then letting surface rust turn in problems by doing nothing. many people seem to think its only original once does that include the type of things I am thinking of doing. such as clean and paint the frame,rear,drive shaft,wheels and drums,wash and clean the ,engine, also is any engine detailing out of the question. thanks for any and all comments or feelings you all may have on this matter,as I do not want to do anything to decrease the value off this survivor car, I would try to have it judged as such but that is impossible in Hawaii. thanks again Mike  a new member to the club.

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Mike,

I don't have the answer to all your questions because I have never had the good fortune of being the curator of a true museum quality car.   If I were where you are, my first contact would be to Bloomington Gold to talk to the head judge of Bloomington Survivor.   My second contact would be to the National Corvette Museum to talk to their curators.  My third call or e-mail would be to NCRS who have chief judges that specialize in 57's.

 Best of luck to you,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

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I need to lift the body on my '61 about six inches. The front mount (under radiator) and rear mounts (in trunk) are easy to access. I'm trying to find out how to access the passenger compartment mounts. I'm not disassembling the whole car, so I'd like to know just what I have to remove in the passenger compartment to access the top side of the mounting bolts.
Great article in the current On Solid Ground about removing the dash cluster. That's the project for this winter to finally have my tachometer repaired. Can you reccomend anyone that does gauge repairing?
 
Thank you for your time, Mike

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Mike,
 
Lifting the body of your 61 six inches is not going to be  simple task. The 4 front passenger compartment bolts are under the carpet and the rears are behind the seats. You will need to access these to hold the bolt heads to remove the nuts from the bottom. But  there is more.
 
1,   disconnect the steering box from the frame.......or the drag link from the steering box.
2.   disconnect the throttle linkage from the carburetor.
3.    remove front bumpers and brackets.....you may get away with unbolting brackets from the frame
4.   remove rear bumpers and brackets.......   "    "       "      "       "         "                "         "       "      "
5.   disconnect brake line at master cylinder
6.   disconnect main fuel line at tank line under car
7.   remove clutch pedal push rod
8.   FI car? remove air cleaner to air meter hose
9.   starter harness, temp sending wire and ground wires at valve covers could be a problem if you don't have 6" of free play
10.  windshield washer hoses could be a problem too
11. you will most like need to remove the lower radiator hose
 
There are probably other things I have forgotten to mention.
 
Chip Werstein
 
Mike,
 
One more thing. Don't forget to remove your spare tire bolt before lifting the body.
 
For gage restore and repair I have used Valley Vettes in San Diego for many years. Contact Mike Poirier at 619-461-1952.
 
Chip Werstein

 

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My 61 has a brand new battery but when I turn it over I get nothing at all; is it starter? Something else? Thanks!
Mike

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,

Without some minimal diagnostics you can't tell.

12 VDC at the new battery ?  Do the headlights, interior lights, horn & turn signals work ?

If yes, OK.  If no, check your battery cable connections.

 12 VDC at ballast resistor & coil with the ignition switch ON ?
If yes, OK.  If no, check ignition switch function.

 If yes to all, check the cables & terminals on the starter solenoid for corrosion, loose nuts or studs or a broken solenoid cap. You should hear an audible click as it engages, if it works.  If solenoid is OK it's on to the starter.

Original starter ? Rebuild it while you have it torn down.  Starter rebuild kits with brushes & bushings are available from most Corvette parts vendors.  Older replacement ? Consider buying a correctly date coded starter from  Corvette Central or Masters City.

 Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

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62 Vette I’m restoring has new panel on front nose where emblem and letters mount. Does anyone have a template or accurate dimensions to help locate mounting holes? Any advice on how to layout correctly would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Jon

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The best thing for you to do is make your own template from an existing 62 Corvette….preferably one that does have the emblems installed so you can easily locate the holes and the dimensions for making your own template….a little bit of patience and you should be good to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gentlemen, I have a question regarding the clutch linkage on my 1962 Corvette #6728.  While replacing the clutch cross shaft bellcrank bushing, I noticed that both clutch pivot ball studs are badly worn.  I've ordered two new ones and replaced the one on the engine side clutch pivot bracket, but I'd appreciate any advice you may have on removing and installing the one on the outer clutch pivot bracket.  I'm afraid if I press it out I'll have trouble securing the new in place.  Any advice would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks for the help.
Dave

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Dave,

I had the same problem on a 1960 several years ago.

My solution, instead of staking, peening or welding the chassis ball in place, was to have a machine shop make me a part exactly like the OEM part except I had them add a pilot diameter and a threaded shaft to stay centered in the hole in the frame rail bracket. It was held in place with a nut & lock washer.

It ended up looking like a small trailer hitch ball.

Next time you do a frame-off feel free to replace the threaded ball with the correct part & process to satisfy the purists at NCRS.


Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

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Is there a high RPM tach and lower RPM tach?
What determines if the corvette had a distributor driven tach or a generator driven one.
my 61 has the generator driven one but I have seen some with the distributor driven tach. John

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  1961 Corvettes with hydraulic camshafts used a low RPM redline tachometer that was driven by the generator.  Solid lifter Corvettes had high redline tachometers but only the solid lifter fuel injection motor had both high RPM redline and was driven by the distributor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a 1960 corvette with a 4.56 rear end and 230 horse 283 and 3 speed trans. My father bought it new in 1959 at weber chevy in st.louis. The revs so high it is hard to drive the speed limit on the highway. We would like to change ring and pinion to maybe 3.70 or 3.55 and put in a richmond super t10 4 speed. Does richmond have a model of the t10 that would swap in w/o much problem. My father would like a first gear ratio of 2.88 with a 3.55 rear axle for decent takeoff and lower highway rpm....can you help me. Thanks, Bill

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Bill,

Because you and your dad have had the car since it was new, I would advise having the rear end rebuilt with either 3.55 or 3.70 ratios rather than just finding a replacement differential.

Contact Darrell Shepherd at 4 Speed's by Darrell in Vermilion, IL.
He can rebuild your differential and also build you a T10 4-speed in the ratios you need.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

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Hi guys,mike from Hawaii here, I have an orig,57 vette,and over the years it has received some door dings in the cove molding, I have tried but can not find info on the proper and safe way to remove,repair and replace the cove molding. if any one knows of any literature or tools that may help that would be great as well as  the best repair manuals. videos are great and pictures speak 1000 wards. been looking at other peoples problems but they don’t seem to get the answers they need thanks for any help that can be given mike.

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mike,
The procedure for cove trim removal & replacement is the same for 1956-1961.
Roll the windows all the way up,
Remove the door release knob, window regulator handle and door lock lever,
Remove the door pull on '58-61,
Remove the door panel,
Remove the two inner door access covers,
Loosen the nut, star washer & flat washer from all the trim attachment studs inside the door,
Loosen the 2 nuts, star washers & flat washers at he front edge of each door. 
If the trim hasn't already separated from the door, rotate the stud CCW to release the head of the stud from the trim.  New door trim is available or you can have the old refurbished.
To re-install, reverse the process.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Bill Herron, Past SACC Treasurer: 

To add to Bill’s directions (for the cove moldings on the body – not the door), removal is virtually the same – just remove the kick panel on each side of the interior.  Note that some of the trim studs are accessible from the interior and the balance are accessible from the engine bay.

 

Bill Herron

 

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Bill had a great step by step procedure on how to remove and reinstall your molding.  

 

If you are intent on refurbishing the stainless yourself, the Eastwood company of Pottsville, PA (www.easrwood.com), has videos, tools and supplies for refurbishing and finishing all your stainless.

 

If you have the patience, it is possible. I did much of my '60's stainless including a couple of the hubcaps, but it is a tedious and dirty process.  Make sure to use an apron, gloves, face shield, hat and cover everything for at least 20 feet around your buffer.

 

 

 

 

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Hi, I have a 1960 Vette and trunk lid is sagging, I have new springs but how do I compress them to install, thank you, Richard

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Richard,
 
I recently dealt with this same problem on a 57. When opened the trunk lid would drop over 6". 
 
With the hinge/spring mechanism exposed use a screw driver to pry up the bottom of the spring and insert a shim under the spring. The shim can be a front end or fender shim or you can cut a washer to make the shim. Once installed, check your trunk lid sag. if it is not enough improvement, install another shim. You can install the shims on one or both sides until you get the desired result. It may take some trial and error, but you will fix the problem and it is a whole lot easier than replacing the springs. Reinstall the trunk liner and you cannot see the repair.
 
I ended up putting 2 shims on the left side spring. Now the lid drops only 1".
 
Chip Werstein

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I am not a member but would be interested in joining. I have a 62,340 horse Honduras Maroon Corvette. I love to drive it but my left side wiper transmission broke and I need to have it rebuilt. I am having a hard time getting one of the mounting nuts off under the dash. I am about to go buy a 1/4 inch 3/8 socket on a swivel to see if that works. Any other suggestions?

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  If you are over 50 years old I recommend that you make a preappointment to a good Chiropractor!  This is probably one of the most difficult jobs there is on a 58-62 C1 Corvette as the clutch and brake pedal bracket assembly is in the way.  I have had success using a ¼ inch flexible wire type extension attached to a hex head type screwdriver and a ¼ inch socket.  Good luck……..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Next problem is excessive play in the steering wheel. Rebuilt the front suspension and steering gear box but problem not corrected. Have had it to two mechanics and an alignment shop and they make adjustments on the gear box but haven’t been able to correct the problem. Always say its an old car and it is normal. I had a 60 before and didn’t have this problem so there must be a solution????

Appreciate your help,

Ralph

From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ralph,
Regarding the charge gauge, there are two possibilities, It is either defective or it works but is indicating the no external input. Before you buy a new gauge and replace it, check the wiring, routing and connections to make sure it is getting electrical input.

There are folks out there like Paragon Reproductions or Clocks by Roger who rebuild original gauges if an exact replacement isn't available.

 Regarding excessive play in the steering, rebuild and correct adjustment of the steering gearbox only gets you about half-way there. I had the same issue after I rebuilt mine.

 Lock the steering wheel in place (strap between wheel & seat frame works great), put the front end on jack stands.

Move the front tires in and out at the bottom. Any movement is excess bearing play.

Move the driver side tire side to side at the mid-line.   Look for a cracked third arm bracket.  Look for missing seal above third arm bearing.

  Look for excess play vertically in the third arm where the inner tie rod ends attach.   
       Could mean worn bearing.
       Could mean loose bearing attachment nut.
       Missing Cotter key ?

 Look for excessive play in the outer tie rod ends.  Look for excessive play in both ends of the drag link.   Not everybody knows there are 21 front end fittings that must be lubed.  Once you lube them & get things loose, you may find that either they need some adjustment or some replacement parts are required. Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Your steering boxes worm shaft and sector shaft are probably completely worn out and will have to be replaced.  Paragon sells a complete steering box repair kit.  With new parts and proper adjustment your steering box should be nice and tight.  Don’t overlook the drag link from the steering box to the third arm as it also could be worn out or out of adjustment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1960 windshield replacement.  I am looking for specific directions to find a video on this procedure. Thank you

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

John,

Paragon reproductions has a YouTube video series that shows dash pad, windshield & carpet installation. Hope this helps.

 Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

  I am not aware of any video showing windshield removal and replacement.  The 1953-1962 Corvette Service Guide ST-10 has a section dedicated to the body.  Section 1-3 through 1-6 describes windshield removal, frame disassembly and reassembly and reinstallation.  Removal of the windshield and frame from the body is pretty straight forward, however, the disassembly and reassembly of the windshield and frame assembly is a whole “other ball game.”  Difficult for the novice to accomplish and requires extreme care and patience to get it right the first time.  Good luck with this project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi,
A friend / club member has a awesome 1957 Corvette with 4 speed.  His 4 speed bit the dust this weekend.  Can the transmission be removed without removing the engine?
 
Stan

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Yes.  If it is an original 57 4 speed T-10 it will be all cast iron and very heavy.  Support the engine at the oil pan with a block of wood and then proceed to pull the transmission out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Herron, Past SACC Treasurer: 

S
tan,

The transmission IS the rear engine mount! You must support the engine block near the rear or get a BIG surprise when you drop the trans!  I’ve made a cradle out of 2x4s to support the block on either side of the oil pan – this prevents any potential damage to the pan itself.

 

Bill Herron

 

 

 

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Hello !
Have a built 383 in my '62 and am experiencing leakage in the water pump/motor mount assembly.  Have replaced gaskets several times and re-tighten bolts frequently.  I have safety wired the bolts and they don't seem to be turning, but they still get loose.   Soooo must be bolts are stretching.  The block is very solid and won't rock even slightly on the front mounts.  Question is, could a rigid front mount overstress the bolts ?  Even a little cushion in the mount might reduce strain on the 4 bolts that hold the assembly together. Your opinion would be valued.
Thanks

From: Bill Hufman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Gary,

I am assuming that even with the 383 stroker, you have a stock water pump, front motor mount bracket, rubber cushions & RH/LH frame mounting brackets.

Use two sets of water pump gaskets. One set between block & motor mount bracket, the other between bracket & water pump.  Use gasket sealer on all four gaskets. Use lock-tite on the grade 8 pump bolts and torque to 25-30 lb-ft.  With the rubber mounting cushions, there should be a little lateral movement as the engine is revved.  The gaskets, Lock-tite and gasket sealer should take care of the leaks.  The grade 8 bolts & appropriate torque should take care of the stretching and loosening.  A trick I learned from an old Corvette racer, when working on the pump, insert 3/8 threaded rod or studs into the two outboard pump attachment holes. This allows you to remove the water pump without having to jack up the engine and re-align everything back up. It also saves having to put new gaskets next to the block unless they are really needed. 

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Water pump gaskets leaks has always been somewhat of a problem with C1s.  Gaskets supplied by remanufacturers and some auto parts stores are made from cheap material and are inferior.  I always use genuine Felpro gaskets which are blue in color and I then spray paint them “Chevy Orange”.  Good ‘old Permatex sealer works really well but you must go back and retighten the bolts every so often as even the Felpro gaskets will “crush” over time.  Over tightening the bolts will cause the cheap gaskets to crush out and split.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 I have owned Vette 33 years, the original owner put 327 short block in Vette in 1962. I finally got the original engine from him.
The old 327 ran great and then
I need to replace clutch, rebuild 4 SPD, put new exhaust on Vette, so I decided to put original 283 245 hp back in Vette,
They rebuilt engine, had to bore 30 over, new pistons, new cam, rebuilt heads, carbs,
Duel points distributor, (running on one set points), Vette idled fine, drove about 8-12 miles, no problem.
Two day later I drove vette back to my home, approximately 20 miles, mostly back roads and last 9 on interstate, ran between 55 - 60 mph.
I noticed temp up to 200 degrees. When I existed, pulled to stop, Vette went dead, and lost coolant threw over flow pipe. After about 30 minutes, it cooled, and i tried to start, Vette struggled, but started.
I was 2 tenths mile to home, and I made it ok.

I suspected thermostat, which was 180 degrees, so I replaced it with 160 degrees.
Tested 180 thermostat and it seemed to work fine.

Replaced lost coolant, let Vette Idle till 170 temp, cold see water circulating and test drove about 12 miles, seemed ok,
When got back home and turned off, then restarted, Vette was sluggish, but started.

Next day, it started fine, till idle, temp rose to 160 and i drove about 3 miles, nearing stop sign, engine died, temp was 180, and again would not restart until  cooled, it again struggled but finial started.

Never had this problem, radiator was flushed ( this was on 327) water pump was on 327( it isn't leaking and seems fine.

My only thought, is everything about the cooling system was on 327 and worked fine, now new engine.
Would would cause the over heating in the engine?
Any suggestion to cause this problem?
 

From: Bill Hufman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jim,
A short personal story. 
Bought a 1960 in 2000 that had a 307 truck engine in it.

I installed a completely rebuilt, correct 283 , bored .030 over with new pistons & cam,

160 deg. thermostat with a stock radiator & correct water pump and had exactly the 
same overheating problem.

The new cam was the 327-350 HP SB version instead of a Duntov cam.

 A new 4 core Dewitt reproduction brass radiator helped but didn't cure it.  
Adding a stock clutched fan allowed the engine temp to stabilize.   I never did figure out exactly why it overheated but was able to make the problem go away.  A couple of things I learned:

Carter carburetors are heated with cored passages in the intake manifold so the overheated engine causes the fuel to boil over & tends to flood the engine.  Premium gas has a higher boiling temp and so tends not to flood the engine as easily.
Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

from: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Two things come to my mind about your problem with overheating. (1) Retarded ignition timing as it appears that you also replaced the distributor with an original 245 HP dual point, 1110891.  Centrifugal advance mechanism may be stuck or frozen causing the engine to be “out of time.” (2) Severely corroded water jackets in the engine block causing poor coolant flow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have a 1960 Corvette with a 283 and a 4 barrel carb.  Once in a while there is a strong odor of gas, and it seems the vent line at the gas door is spilling gas.  Is it possible the gas cap has gone bad?  I also have to replace the over fill rubber hose that is on the nipple below the filler neck.  I removed the tank cover, but I can't get my hand on the nipple.  I was told there is a way to do this without removing the filler neck. 
Thanks for your help.
Barry

From Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Barry,

There are many reasons that you could be smelling gasoline and a bad  seal on your (Non-vented) gas cap is only one of them.

 In no particular order because I have seen them all:

Leaking gas tank seam,Rust pin holes in bottom of tank,
Leaking drain plug on tank RH bottom,
Leak at gas line/ sending unit fitting, 
Broken/ loose vent line nipple on tank RH top
Deteriorated rubber vent hose from vent nipple to gas door,
Leakage at connector hose between tank and filler tube, and over-filling the gas tank.

 With the tank cover removed, you should have access to the entire tank system including vent, sending unit and fill tube.  The fill tube hose attaches to the fill tube on one end and the tank nipple on the other with two hose clamps.   The tank cover really does give all the access you need.

 If the vent hose is installed properly in the filler area, there shouldn't be gas spillage thru it. Consult your Assembly Instruction Manual page 121 for details..  Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.
Michigan Chapter SACC

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I am looking for assistance to resolve an electrical problem that I am having with my headlights.

All other electrical systems work properly (parking lights, tail lights, license plate lamps, turn signals, radio, dash lights, courtesy light, radio, etc...).

A few years ago I was driving the Corvette when it became dark and the headlights would not function - either standard or high beam - that was a fun ride home with my 'leading the way' for me.  After talking with several people the consensus was that it was probably the dash mounted switch, which appears to be original and is a little bit 'sticky' and sluggish when pulled or turned.  I purchased a replacement from CC but when it arrived the headlights mysteriously began to function again so I put the switch on the shelf.

Just this season after taking the car out of storage the lights no longer function again so I installed the new switch but other than having smoother mechanical action the electrical results are the same as with the original switch.

I looked back in the CPRL archives and learned that there is no headlamp relay.  I checked the ground at the back of the console and determined that it is OK.

I then began to dismantle the headlights in order to check for corrosion on the terminals or other physical signs of damage, etc... but didn't find anything out of the ordinary.

I next used a continuity and DC voltage meter to check the ground at the sockets and confirmed that they are OK - note I have only checked the low beams but on both sides.

When I check for ~12V I get proper voltage on the tan colored wire with the dimmer switch in position 'A' but when I engage the dimmer switch again to position 'B' I don't have any voltage at the socket.  For this reason I checked the connection at the dimmer switch and found it to be dirty but not corroded.  I cleaned the terminals and rechecked with no different result.  I have a 'new' dimmer switch in my stash of spare parts so I plugged this switch into the harness with no different result.  I also checked continuity through both dimmer switches and found them to appear to work the same.

Lastly, I powered up the headlight directly to the battery to make sure I wasn't missing something very simple - I did have to jump the battery when taking out of storage - and confirmed that the headlight does work on both low and high beams.

I am not sure what to try next.  I am not sure but am not confident that I have a strong enough ground or what is going on with the voltage delivered to the socket.

Please let me know if you have any ideas and have some 'advanced' electrical skills that this mechanical engineer doesn't seem to remember.  If you are in metro Detroit and are willing to stop by I may have some cold beer.

Thanks to all for your assistance.

Ira

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ira,

Many years ago I had a similar problem with headlights that worked erratically.

The top center attachment screw that holds the 2 headlight buckets in place is the ground connection for the headlights. Try running a ground wire from there down to the bumper on each side. If it cures the problem, install the ground wires down to the frame on each side.

 

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC 

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OK  it never seems to get cleared up. Wha tyeasr did the vettes from 56 to 62 have the completely solid full wheel hub caps? and what years did they have the small open slots at the outer edge of the 56 57 and maybe 58 vettes? Thanks scott

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  56-57-58 use the same solid hub cap.  The 59-60-61-62 use the slotted hub cap.

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Herron, Past SACC Treasurer: 

The 1956-58 Corvettes had solid full wheel covers.  1959-62 full wheel covers had slots.

 

Bill Herron

 

 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  Most 1953 thru '55 Corvettes also came with full spinner look-a-like type wheelcovers without slots.

However, I believe it is the later style you are referencing, with a false two wing knock-off wheel nut, were on 1957 thru 1962 solid axle Corvettes.  The full wheelcovers (part #3725239), which were solid (no slots), were available on '56 to '58 Corvettes; while the '59 thru '62 full wheelcovers (part #3759119 & 3759120) had ten open slots, to aid in cooling the brakes.

According to Noland Adams, it is possible some of the earliest '59 Corvettes were shipped with left-over '58 wheelcovers,

Happy Independence Day!
 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Scott,

Corvette hubcaps were solid (no slots) from 1956-1958 and vented (with slots) from 1959-1962.

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

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I did not know there was this solid axel Corvette Club! But now that I do I need some help with my 59’ Corvette! Iam converting over to disc brakes using Wilwood 4 piston discs front and back and need to know and find a Master Cylinder that will fit in the existing area on the firewall that the stock one fits! Most newer master cylinders with a dual resorvior have only 2 mounting holes. Iam looking for one that has the same mounting flange on the master cylinder as the original that will mount flush like the original!
If you know of one or ones that will fit please let me know! Wilwood sent me one that is way to big and I do not want to modify the firewall to make it work!

From: Doug Prince, Socal Chapter Advisor:  First of all most would agree that you need to stop wasting your time and money on this conversion.  A good quality professional C1 brake job works just fine and will give you many years of stopping power. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Gentlemen, I am in the process of buying a 60 Vette bk/sil, 4 spd matching numbers 315 Fuelie, the numbers on the block, soft top delete. CS and Vin on block all match.  The owner claims 315 but I though these were 290 engines, the FI unit # ends in 320 and the plenum is the smooth top unit no ribs, car was produced in mid April.. Is there any way I can determine whether this a 290 or 315? You seem to be the only source that can help me with this.  Thanks in advance,   Dave

From: Chip Werstein, Southern California Chapter Advisor: 

Dave,
 
The 1960 high horse FI motor was scheduled to be rated at 315hp. The increase from 290hp to 315hp was due to the all new aluminum cylinder heads designed for this motor. The heads proved troublesome and to the best of my knowledge were never released for production. So Chevy bolted on the old iron Power Pack heads and sent the high horse fuelies out the door with the same motor as used in 1959 which was a 290 hp. Perhaps a few 315hp cars were delivered early in the model year, but I have never seen one. I bought a 1960 Fi car (vin# around 2000) in 1980 and it had Power Pack heads. I think it is safe to say that there were no 315hp cars sold in the 1960 model year.
 
The 320 unit is correct for the car and CS indicates solid lifter fuel injection.

 

 

**********

I am a member of the SACC and have a question.  I am restoring a 1962 Corvette and have lost track of where the various wires and tubes pass through the firewall.  Can you point me to a resource that can help?
I hate to bother you but hope you can give me some guidance.
 
Thank you,
 
Ron

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ron,

The answer to this question and hundreds more is in the Corvette Assembly Instruction Manual.  If you have one, use it.  If you don't have one, make it your next purchase.  My manual from Corvette Central is all 11.5 x 7 sheets and copied directly from Chevrolet drawing.  My manual from Mid-America is  combination of 11.5 x 7 and 11 x 17 sheets and contains a table of contents.  
Good luck with your re-assembly,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Hi,
 
I am needing to do something with my leaf springs on my 62 Vette because over the years the rear end does not sit up as it should plus the ride is stiff. I did change out the shocks but that did not set the rear up any higher.  Either, I can replace them with those which are accepted for when my car is judged or send out to have my original ones rebuilt.  Your suggestion plus a supplier or repair shop would be much appreciated.
 
Thanks
#3208

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

SACC member #3208,

Your springs can be rebuilt or replaced with rear springs from any of the reputable Corvette part suppliers.  Both must be done at the same time and It's the same amount of labor and new incidental parts either way.

Check with Allied Spring Co in Corpus Christi to get a price on rebuild.   Compare that to the catalog prices for replacement springs.  Biggest decision is whether you have the equipment to tackle this yourself.     Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Good afternoon;
 
I am asking for decoding assistance regarding a newly acquired 1962 Corvette. On the front engine stamp there are two series of numbers; The first is 2105219 and the second is F1219RD. Can you help me with the decoding? The tag attached to the steering column reads 20867S105219.
 
Thanks,
 
Rick

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Rick,
 
It looks like you have the original motor in your 62.  2105219 on the block pad is the last 6 digits of the VIN #  preceded by a 2 which indicates 1962. F1219RD is the build date and engine code letters. F=Flint built motor, 1219= December 19 and RD is 300hp 327 with manual transmission.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

59 corvette. How does the Charge Meter work and how can I test it?

Thanks,

Ralph

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ralph,

The charge meter in your car is an indicator of electrical charge, in Amps, that the Voltage Regulator is supplying into the Battery from the Generator. When the battery is fully charged, the charge meter should operate just to the right side of "0".

Your friendly neighborhood service station (or GM dealer, Goodyear Store, Belle Tire, etc.) should have a battery tester that is capable of evaluating the entire electrical system. A quick check you can do at home, if you have an electrical meter, is check DC voltage of the battery with engine off and then again with engine running.

If the generator is charging, the regulated voltage will be higher (12 VDC vs 13.5-14.5 VDC) when running.  
 

Good luck with the diagnostics,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

Will an early tach drive distributor work with an early Rochester fuel injection unit?

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The only distributor that will work and operate a Rochester Fuel Injection Unit is a fuel injection distributor that drives the fuel injection’s high pressure pump with a drive cable assembly.  Hydraulic cam fuel injected cars did not have provision for driving the tachometer only the solid lifter fuel injected cars drove both the injector pump and the tachometer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

My vin is 20867S103442.      1962.  What should my windshield markings be?   Can you decode, or explain the vin number ( mfg date etc).  Thank you.

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Chapter Advisor: 

Your 62 vin# 3442 was built on Nov. 30, 1961. Your LOF glass should contain code letters indicating the month and year of the glass. These dates should be prior to the build date of the car and it is not necessary for all dates( windshield and side glass) to match. I believe the glass in your car should be dated A L (Sept. 61), Y L (Oct.61) or possibly C L ( Nov. 61 ).
 
My 62 was built one month before yours......Oct. 30, 1961. The windshield is dated T L ( Aug.61) and the side windows Y L ( Oct. 61). Hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I have a '62 FI corvette that leaks oil at the tach dash connection.

     I've replaced the old one with a new one but still get oil dripping. Any thoughts on how to stop the oil from going up the cable.

     Thank You!  

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal chapter advisor:  The problem that you have is your FI distributor oil seals are worn out.  The FI distributor has an internal gear case that is fed oil from the oil pressure gauge connection at the rear of the engine block.  Because the oil line to the distributor is under pressure the seals keep the oil from coming out into the FI fuel pump drive cable and the tachometer drive cable.  The oil seals in your distributor will have to be replaced which will require removal of the distributor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
I have had my 1958 for 25 years and have enjoyed its company since.  But, time to do a little work on her.  I have taken the 3rd member and axles out to install disc brakes and now that I am ready to reinstall I am not sure what to use to fasten the 3rd member back in place.  The nuts on it have a washer fixed to the nut and can rotate.  But, I have also heard people saying that there should be copper washers.  My car is not 100% correct, I.E., motor and now brakes, but, would like to keep as correct as possible.
 
Thank you,
Kevin

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Kevin,
 
The nuts with the captive washers are correct for a 58-62 Corvette 3rd member. 56 and 57 used a separate nut with a copper washer. Either will work fine.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Kevin,

I have nuts with copper washers on both of my 1960's and to my knowledge they are original parts.
A member of Michigan Chapter, a retired GM engineer who worked at St Louis plant starting in 1958, told me that when the line ran out of parts and new stock wasn't available, they would borrow from the truck plant or even go to the local hardware to maintain production. No doubt in my mind that both versions could be "original equipment". 
 

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

I have a 58 that was originally a 290hp fuelie in Inca Silver. Since I ‘am not a fan of Silver and I was thinking of painting the car one of the other colors available in 1958. I know only 193 cars were painted Inca Silver in 58 and my question is does the rarity of the color have any affect on the value of the car?

From: Doug Prince, Socal Chapter Advisor:    Your situation is a common dilemma in the C1 Corvette world as there are no paint or trim tags for C1s only some well known places to look for evidence of originality.  There is an old saying in the collector car world “there is an ass for every seat.”  What someone distains someone else wants so it is a matter of what you desire and want vs what someone else might want down the road.  Let your conscious be your guide as color is in the eyes of the beholder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Member #2034,

I agree with Doug that it is your car, there are no code plates and do what pleases you.

However, there are some other considerations.  For instance, your statement: I have a 58 that was originally a 290hp fuelie in Inca Silver.  Is it still a fuelie ? Is it still Inca Silver or has some previous owner been made happy and didn't do it well ?  If it is still an Inca Silver fuelie, originality is probably worth far more than your personal taste.
Otherwise, have fun with your car.

 Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

**********

Charge meter doesn’t indicate charge or discharge.  Starts and runs until battery discharges.  Test lamp shows generator power to Regulator Armator (A) terminal good, but no light at Batt output  terminal when wire from battery is disconnected and car running on Battery??  Replaced Regulator, but no change. Should test Light not light at Batt terminal with battery wire disconnected?? Appreciate your help,

Ralph

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Ralph,

 

Old Corvettes sometimes need to have the generator polarized.

Installing a new battery, voltage regulator, ballast resister, generator or just jumping the battery can prompt the electrical system to reverse. A DC generator is a DC motor running backward.

Use a short (4-5 inch) piece of insulated wire formed into an arc to create a spark between the BATT & GEN terminals on your voltage regulator.  If your generator is old, it is also possible that brushes are worn (or hung up) to the point where it just can't charge and your car really is just running on battery.  A rebuild could be required.  Or, as happened to me, a great opportunity to obtain a correctly  dated generator to replace an earlier incorrect replacement.  

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

I use to be a member>  i installed a new clock in my 62 corvette, but i can push it in but i cannot turn the clock to center 12 oclock. thanks

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  I am not sure I understand your question..............but to set the clock in your 62 you pull the stem OUT and turn it either right or left  to adjust the time. You question indicates to me that you are attempting to push the stem IN to adjust the time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Dear "Used to be a member",

If I understand your question correctly, you are having trouble installing the clock into the console plate.

The clock has a wave spring installed over the main body that works between the clock bezel and the console plate. To install the clock into the console plate, the spring must be compressed to allow the clock to rotate & seat past the detent.

After proper installation, 12 o'clock should indeed be located at 12 o'clock.

 Good luck with your project, 

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

I have 3 questions. After installing new main wiring harness
in my 1959 corvette, 1st,  horn beeps on right turn (horns rebuilt, turn signals & brake lights work correctly). Used old cancelling cam since new one would not  engage for turn signals.   2nd, dash  instrument lights do not come on & 3rd,  temp gauge pegs as soon as ignition switch is turned on. Thoughts? Thanks. Paul

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Paul,
 
I'll give this one a try.
 
1. The horn contact ( the spring loaded brass contact is shorting out on right turns). I have seen this numerous times. Check the white plastic insulator for the horn contact to make sure it is long enough to insulate the contact from the steering wheel hub.
 
2. Dash lights. check for burned out fuse.
 
3. Your ignition switch has 6 blades on it. The starter harness  has 1 connector that plugs into 3 of the blades....can't screw that up. 2 of the other 3 blades.....are connected to the main harness via 2 pink wires to the ignition switch blades marked ACC. The 3rd blade is marked BAT. Nothing should be connected to that. I suspect that one of your pink wires is connected to the BAT blade.
 
Hope this helps. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Hello,
 
My 62 vette 327/340HP  and has a 4- speed tranny. The speedo is not working. I am guessing it is the cable, but want to troubleshoot it. Disconnecting from the dash was easy, but it looks like you have to disconnect the tranny linkages to get it loose on the tranny side. Is this true? If it turns out NOT to be the cable what is the next most likely candidate? Answers or other advice is appreciated.
Thanks,
Danny

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Welcome to C1 speedometer cable 101.  A speedometer problem can be many things so where do you start?  First place to start is the nylon gear in the transmission as this is not really hard to observe its condition.  Disconnect the speedometer cable at the transmission speedometer drive and carefully remove the speedometer gear housing from the transmission.  You will need to loosen and remove a ¼ 20 bolt and a sliding transmission cable housing hold down assembly.  Pull out the transmission speedometer assembly and observe the condition of the nylon gear.  If it is all “chewed up” then you must replace it with the proper gear that matches your rear axle ratio.  The square ends of the speedometer cable could be broken and this would indicate very sever binding probably requiring replacement of the complete cable assembly.  Lastly the speedometer head assembly maybe old and worn out and this will require pulling the complete dash cluster and sending the speedometer head to a competent shop for rebuild.  This problem requires you to find out where the problem lies and making the required fixes to fix the problem.  Good luck………

 

 

 

 

**********
I am restoring a 1960 c1 and looking for details for front suspension assembly.
I also need to know how to set alignment adjustments (upper outer control arm)
Where can I find this information?
Thank you
Jim

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The Corvette Servicing Guide S-10 is an excellent source of information and guide to serving the C1 Corvette.  It is available from the NCRS web site.  Chapter three gives an in depth guide to rebuilding the C1 front suspension.  Some special tools may be required.  Front end shops that know how set up the C1 alignment specifications are few and far between so finding someone who knows what they are doing may be your hardest part.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello All, I am the proud owner of a 1962 Corvette, 327/340HP. Just prior to my purchase the former owner put in new seat covers and carpets from Al Knoch. The Dash is pretty worn and has some stress cracks/tears in a couple places so I want to replace it with the original Red color. My question is two fold: 1 - Is there a difference in the pad from Al Knoch vs Paragon vs Corvette Central. If not I will likely use that as the additional purchase to reach the minimum sale so I can claim the discount. However if the Al Knoch Dash is better than I would wait and buy that from there.  2- Is this a long process for the do it yourselfer?
Anyway, thanks for any help! Hope to see you all in Memphis.
Danny

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Danny,

I believe that there is generally one manufacturer licensed to reproduce each GM reproduction part.  The same emblems, valve covers or rear tail lights on your 62 come from Trim Parts, Inc in Ohio because they bought the original GM tooling under license. Paragon owns the GM tooling for front bumpers on your car. Al Knoch, Corvette Central, Corvette America, Echlers, Mid-America, etc. all make GM licensed parts. All the Corvette parts outlets sell these same parts but you can sometimes note a price difference due to mark-up.

I know that Paragon and Corvette Central sometimes list a US made part and a less expensive imported part in their catalogs.  Whoever you're dealing with, ask them where it is sourced.  In the case of the dash pad, due to tooling cost for molds, I believe they are all made and purchased from the same manufacturer. The last one I bought was from Paragon at a swap meet (half price-out of the box).

 
Question 2 is a little trickier.

Yes, a do-it-yourselfer can get it done.   However, all replacement dash pads must be cut & trimmed to fit, so cut carefully.  Remember the pad has to fit under the lower windshield gasket after the instument cluster, radio speaker, rearview mirror, passenger grab bar, end caps & package tray are tightened into place.  The worst thing that can happen is you spoil a $400 pad and get to start over.  We'll see you in Memphis. Perhaps you & Patti can caravan back to Michigan with us.

 Good luck with your project.

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC 

 

**********

After 6 car Shows (won 4) it has a couple of Dings on the Chrome Fender (top of) pieces and the Brow over the Grill Teeth.
Also, the bumpers need Re-chroming. I've never did any of this removal work before and would like to hear from members if there is anything I should know about.. Short cuts or just helpfull hints.
Thanks, Vince

From:  Bill Hufman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Vince,

You didn't say where you are located but I will have to assume that it is a rust belt car and has never been apart before.

An assembly manual is absolutely essential, so start there.

Go to your local parts store and buy the best rust busting penetrating oil they recommend to allow you to loosen old bolts without breaking them. After they have been soaked for 24 hours, then you can try to loosen them using a 6-point socket.  For better access, put the front of the car on jack stands and remove the front wheels.
If you get in a hurry, for sure & even if you aren't, bolts may break off in the front bumpers,

resistance welded studs that attach the grill teeth bar may break loose, square resistance welded nuts may break loose off the two front bumper brackets on each side and bolts may break off in the front frame horns where the bumper brackets attach.  Where possible, a little heat may help. An impact wrench might help.   Just remember the Hippocratic Oath, "Do your patient no harm".   It's easier & far less expensive to get professional help before you break something then after.

 Assuming that all the nuts, bolts and studs can be loosened w/o breaking, start by removing the nuts that hold the grill tooth bar to the bumpers. That will give you access to the grill surround. The dent in the upper surround may be because it is diecast and somebody tightened that particular attachment stud too tight.

Make sure you protect the paint on the edges above & below the front bumpers on both dis-assembly & re-assembly. Paint chips very easily there. 

Good luck on your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

Does the hood have to come off?  Radiator replacement on a late '62.

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Oh Yes and you will lots of fun with the lower radiator hose, upper and lower fan shroud and aluminum drain cock………..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:

I always remove the hood to replace the radiator. It just makes the job easier in my opinion. However, it is possible to remove the radiator by disconnecting the hood support and tipping the hood all the way forward so it is standing up straight. I have never tried this, but I have seen it done once. If you choose to try this method, be sure to tie the hood off so it can't fall back while you are working.
 
Chip

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 
I have seen a small number of 57-60 T10 transmissions that didn’t have build dates stamped on them.  They appeared to be original, but I suppose they could have been machined off.  My question is, did Chevy always date stamp them, or was it hit and miss, or perhaps warranty replacement?  It seems odd that if someone took the time to machine off the number they wouldn’t re-stamp them for their application.  Your view is appreciated!
 
 
Kind Regards,

Dane

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dane,
 
Chevy was very good about stamping assembly dates on components including transmissions. I have also seen T-10 cases without any assembly date stampings. These cases were most likely purchased over the counter components...........in other words, not a complete transmission assembly.
 
Back in the 60's I had a friend who street raced a 63 Impala with a 4-speed. He blew up numerous transmissions due to his habit of "speed shifting"..............shifting without using the clutch. The transmissions were never totally destroyed so he would buy from Chevy only those parts necessary to repair his trans, which sometimes included main cases.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

I am a new member & am glad you  are willing & able to answer  our questions ,I have a body mounting kit but not sure where all the pads etc  go ? A picture or drawing would  be great!  Allen

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Purchase the assembly manual from one of the mail order vendors (Corvette Central or Mid America) for you model year.  In it there is a picture of the locations.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

 

**********

I just purchased 4 new American Classic radials from Coker to replace Goodyear bias tires on my 1960 Corvette.  Are there any unique alignment issues to get the best handling possible?  I'm hoping the new tires will make the car easier to drive.

Thanks.

Butch Cooper

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President:

Butch,

I did exactly the same thing last year at the start of the driving season. The Goodyear brand reproduction bias ply tires made the car wander depending on road surface.

4 wheel alignment was checked at the local GM dealer and didn't improve the condition.

Bias were replaced by Coker American Classic radials. The car holds the road much better and no alignment adjustment was required.

For a illustrated how-to article that includes alignment specs, check out "The Mystery Alignment" (VETTE magazine, June 2002, by Richard F. Newton). I believe you will find it helpful.

 

Good luck with your project.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Butch,

 

Our freeways in Southern California have grooves cut into them to help eliminate hydroplaning in the rain because most people in California don’t even know how to drive in the rain.  These grooves make driving with old bias ply tires almost impossible.  Radial tires solve the problem out here in SoCal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I have a 62, think the switch burned out?, guy left the ignition ‘on’ and when I next started the car, it will start but dies when key released to on position.  Is this normal?,  I’d have to keep key in start position and engine runs, but will kill starter?...If this is correct and I have to replace switch, how do I get the switch out?, I’ve been reading and see the 2 small pin holes, which hole (or both) do I use.?  Many thanks.  Looks like I need to be become member.

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Hi!

 Your 1962 has a two circuit ignition system. When you start the engine, full voltage is supplied to the starter, coil, distributor, and the entire ignition circuit. After the engine starts and you turn the ignition switch to the ON position, the starter is not powered, and the ignition system switches over to the RUN position.

 While the ignition had full voltage for starting, it is now directed through a dropping resistor that sends about 6 volts to the ignition system instead of 12 volts. Since it starts but won’t run in the ON position, that dropping resister is probably faulty. It is in a rectangular ceramic base about one by two inches. It is mounted on the firewall near the distributor with a resistor inside and two wires connecting it to the ignition system.

 It sounds like the ignition switch is ok; replace the resistor and you should be good to go. These resistors were used on all 12 volt Chevrolets starting in 1955, so your favorite Corvette parts store should have one in stock.

 Good Luck, Noland Adams

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  You have burned out the ballast resistor and must replace it.  When the ignition switch is turned to the start mode the starter solenoid sends twelve volts directly to the 9 volt side of the ballast resistor for starting purposes only.  When you release the ignition switch to the run position the ballast resistor drops the voltage down from 12 volts to 9 volts so as to not burn up the ignition points.  Since your ballast resistor is now burned out it will not send any voltage to the coil wire from the 9 volt side of the ballast resistor to the + side of the coil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello !
Wanting to put long tube headers on a '62.  Doug has a set specified but was unable to find others.  Any ideas about other brands that would fit well without major cutting and swearing ?
Gary

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Hooker Headers which is now a division of Holly list a set of Super Competition Headers as part 2108 for 55-62 Corvettes with standard small block engines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

My dad just purchased a 1962 corvette Vin # 20867S103917.  I was wondering how to find the exact build date and if 1962 cars had trim tags ore any other indicators on the car and where I should look.
 
Thanks

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Nick,

 Your dad’s 1962 Corvette, serial number (or VIN) 20867S3917 come off the St. Louis assembly line on Monday afternoon December 11, 1961. All parts should pre-date this day by a couple of days to 3 to 4 months.  We know it was born on December 11, 1961 because the factory kept a production record. Dennis Moore compiled all of the dates into “The Corvette Birthday Book”, which I use all of the time.  Trim tags appeared on Chevrolets back at least into the 1940s. However, 1953 to 1962 Corvettes did not have trim tags; 1963 was the first Corvette trim tag.  The exterior body color name on 1958 to 1962 Corvettes was hidden on the body, if you don’t know the original color. Also, there may be clues to help identify the original engine’s horsepower. Write again if you have more questions.

**********

Hi!  Can you tell me how I can determine if my 1959 Corvette is and early or late model?  Can you tell by the VIN (J59S105131)?

I would appreciate any help.  Thanks!

George

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Chevrolet built 9670 1959 Corvettes. Your car, #5131 was built March 6 1959 which puts it very close to the middle of the production run and definitely not an early car. In my opinion, an early car would be under vin # 1000 or roughly within the first 10% of production.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Noland Adams, founding President of SACC: 

George,

 I have a different idea of what determines what is an early or late change in any production year. Since yours is a 1959, let’s use ’59 as an example. The hood catches that mounted on the firewall were the same from 1958 through mid-1959, when they changed to the rounder mid- 1959 through 1960 style. This change occurred about serial number 108500 to 109500. As far as this hood  catch is concerned, a ’59 with a serial number 8500 or below would be considered “early” while a 9500 or later would be considered “late”.

 These “early” or “late” versions appear within every Corvette model year, starting in 1953. So, depending on what variation within the model year you are discussing, there could be 10 or more early/late instances.

 I had a ’59 one summer: it was a fun car. Good luck with your ’59.

 Cheers, Noland Adams

 

**********

 I was told you might be able to help me.I have an early 1954 original
> corvette and the engine color is not the blue that everyone sells, It is
> more of a green/blue. Do you know where I can get it or a paint #.Thank you
> so much for your help.****
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Dominic

From: Ken Amrick, Editor, On Solid Ground:  The Eastwood Company (Google it if not familiar with the company)  sells a ceramic 2-part engine emamel that I believe is spot-on for the Corvette color.  It is called Chevy 6 cylinder blue, but it has the greenish tint very different from the deep blue often sold for these engines.  It's part number 51617ZP and it's expensive at $34.00 for the quart and another $14.99 for athe activator. Very high quality though and should be very durable. Here is a photo of my painted engine.  
 

 

**********

 

i am trying to install a conv top  the measurement from the rear bow to bottom bow i believe should be 15.5 in .to achiev this i have the header extending 3 in past the w/s frame. my conv top darts then line up with the rear bow. when latching the front latches , i loose my 15.5 in. measurement. the frame itself has a rear bow,ctr bow,and the header. what am i not understanding? i have been an auto trimmer,since 1972 i need help.

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Chapter Advisor:  Contact Adam Parker at NTHWDZ@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Dear SACC:
 

How long are the stock axle length for a 1959?
Jeffry

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Left        28 13/16"
 
Right     30 5/16"
 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi sacc tech help,  I am looking for a conv. top and frame for a 1957 driver.   will a 56-60 work ok or do i need a 56-58?            what's the diff.  All info.appreciated. Thanks Bob.  sacctech/3326.  sssacc#39.

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Bob.
 
A 56-60 top frame will work on your car.  There are minor differences in the rails between the early and late tops, but most people would not notice. When you buy a frame watch out for bent or broken front rails and rusted out rear bows.

Chip

 

 

 

 

**********

I am doing a frame off restoration of a '54 that I have had since 1962.  I have never had any of the noise suppression parts.  They were gone when I got the car - ignition shield and all.

Is there a good write up somewhere on how the system worked and where I can get the components.  I can buy the shield from Corvette Central, but I do not see the condensers.  Is there a substitute.  Do they do anything other than reduce radio noise.  Are they needed with the newer retro style radios.  The radio was gone when I got the car also.


Thanks,

Clyde
 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Clyde,
 
 I have a '54 with a working stock radio. It works fine and here is what I know about the radio.
     I converted my car to 12 volts many years ago for long trips in the summer. I had the radio reworked with all 12 V tubes ($400)! If you are going to buy a stock radio, see below.
1. I use the stock antenna in the trunk lid and it works as well as the AM antenna systems in my metal cars.
2. There are 2 kinds of noise suppression needed. There are 2 round suppressors for the generator (under the voltage regulator). Mine are original and work fine! The spark plug suppression is the metal shield over the plugs. If you do not have one you will need one. If you can fine an original metal version, good luck and bring lots of $$$$. A fiberglass copy is on my car and I lined the inside with 2 layers of aluminum foil and it works fine. Probably more effective than the metal.
   If you plan on securing a newer design radio, I cannot answer your question re suppression, however, would guess it depends on the radio model and what is built in. I believe alternators have less need for suppression than generators? My guess is finding a 6 volt newer radio would be difficult?
 
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman
Camarillo, CA  

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Clyde,

 

Six cylinder 1953 to 1955 Corvettes had several radio noise suppression devices and a 6 volt electrical system. First, the valve cover had two horizontal tabs with a bolt in each tab. The ignition shield was two pieces; the lower shield was bolted to the engine, while the upper shield mounted on top of the lower shield and on the two tabs on the valve cover. There were three coaxial condensers (capacitors), two mounted on a bracket under the voltage regulator, and one mounted in the upper ignition shield.

 

In the fifties and sixties owners found the radio shielding was just too much trouble, so many left it off. Now the radio had static, and they blamed the antennae mounted inside the trunk lid. some installed a vertical antennae in the cowl, but that didn’t help calm the noise. Actually, the trunk mounted antennae was very sensitive because it had a large area and it was multi-directional . So a lot of early Corvette owners ignored the dead radio or removed it and discarded it.

 

I’ve examined these “condensers” closely. Their center core is a non-magnetic 400 series stainless steel rod, drilled and tapped on each end to accept a machine bolt. A brown (unidentified) insulating material is the next layer, covered by a zinc plated steel shell. One end of the steel shell is bent to provide two mounting tabs which have holes for mounting bolts. The “condenser” on the upper shielding is the positive power lead supplying electricity to the distributor. The external and internal power leads are fastened to the ends with a machine bolt.

 

As far as I can determine, the “condenser” is just a feed-through device that allows electricity to pass through while the shielding is grounded to eliminate electrical noise (static) from the ignition distributor and the voltage regulator.

 

Original “condensers” had the exterior mounting tabs about half way from either end. I have a replacement “condenser” that has the tabs nearer to one of the ends. I’ll sell you this one replacement unit if it will help. Once installed on the upper shielding, no one can detect it. If you can use it, contact me and we can haggle over the price. I suggest you look elsewhere to determine a fair price for this part. SACC members get special consideration.

 

Noland Adams, noland.adams@gmail.com, phone 530) 626-3232

 

**********

I am trying to get my 61 vette back on the road and am now trying to find an original water pump core with the correct original casting number 3732609, GM number, and S number on back side.  The one installed on my engine is an original 64-65 corvette water pump with all casting numbers 3859326, GM10, L129, and S10.  Any help or suggestion would be appreciated.
 
I also have an original 57 engine block that I would sell.
 
Thanks for your attention
Marc in Kansas

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Marc,

Regarding a "correct" water pump for your '61, I would start with Ron Burke at www.chevycool.com
He is located in Scottsdale, AZ and conducted a Corvette water pump seminar at our 2012 National Convention.
Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

 

**********

ARE THE AXLES IN THE 62 VETT THE SAME FOR LEFT AND RIGHT
-John

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  No….one axle is shorter than the other one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

I own a ’57 and I would like some assistance identifying the block.

The engine number on the block is  F919F and 3731548.

The casting number is OK but I can't decode the stamped number, can you help ?

Thanks, Tony
 

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

F919F

 "F" is for Flint, MI, GM's plant where the engine was made.

 "919" is the date: Sept. 19, when the engine was made.  The suffix "F" is a code for certain options.  For 1957 "F" meant the block was made for a "Powerglide" 2-speed automatic transmission.

 

Brad

 

 

 

**********

HI,

I have a 59 that I’ve purchased an original T shifter to replace the Hurst shifter that someone had installed.  I ordered Borg Warner linkage that didn’t fit so ordered Muncie linkage that didn’t fit either.  I’ve tried to get all the numbers I can find on the transmission to try and determine what transmission is in the car.  They are listed below. Can you possibly look at these numbers and help me determine transmission I have so I can possibly order the correct linkage? 
Honestly, since I don’t know what I’m looking for,  I’ll just list all the numbers I could find.

POBOGA
# 10W2594
Bellhousing  3857584

 Sidney

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Sidney,

 Part number 3857584 indicates you may have a 1965-1969 Muncie tail housing  Part number 3925661 indicates you may have a 1970-74 Muncie transmission housing.  Below is what a 1959 / 60 BW T-10 4 speed with stock shifter & linkage looks like.   Shift levers on trans are probably different for Hurst & Muncie. Hurst levers were different than BW shift levers on this one.  That may be your non-fit issue.  Good luck with your project.

Bill Huffman, President, Michigan Chapter SACC

NOTE: The picture is emailed to you.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

 I’m off-body restoring an 1961 Corvette at this moment, vin number: 10867S108622.

Can somebody tell me what the exact building date is form this car?

 With Kindly Regards,

Hans (JGM) van Boxtel, The Netherlands

 

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Hans,

According to the on-line birthday calculator, your car should have been built on 20 May 1961.

http://dreamcarmodelshq.com/corvette-birthday-calculator/

The NCRS Birthday Book will tell you for sure but I don't have one.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

From; Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Dear Hans,

 According to the Corvette Birthday Book (which I’ve found to be quite accurate), your 10867S108622’s final assembly date was on Friday, May 22, 1961, probably about mid-day.

 Good Luck, Noland Adams

From: Chip Werstein, Southern California Chapter:  According to the Corvette Birthday book, 1961 Corvette # 8622 was built May 22,1961.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I am having difficulty getting my ’57 doors to close properly.  I went through the instructions in ST-12 but find that when one adjustment is made, it creates too close a gap or too wide a gap elsewhere around the door.  I suspect that the gap between the door post and the windshield frame may be too close and will cause the door to close only with more effort.  When the window is rolled down, the door closes more easily.  I also think that the reproduction weatherstrip is stiffer and less flexible causing the door to close poorly. 

Can you give me any tips on how to solve this problem or do I just need to learn to live with it?

Art

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Art,

Hope this will help. When reinstalling the doors on my 1960 after a complete dis-assembly, I cut 3 in x 5 in tabs of cardboard to use as spacing shims all around each door. With the door closed & latched, I then tightened the 4 hinge bolts in the door. This seemed to work very well.

In regard to the weatherstrip, I found the new (bought last fall) weatherstrip was softer, more pliable and sealed much better that the weatherstrip bought in the mid-1990's.

Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

Dear SACC Tech Help:
 
I feel certain I am needing to change out the heater core in my 62 vette. I smelled and noticed antifreeze solution  which saturated the floor board carpet on the passengers foot area.  Would you give me some assistance with this in terms on the difficulty...what makes it difficult, instructions and precautions which my be taken in doing this task.
 
Your assistance has been of great benefit to me in the past and I want to take this time to thank all whom have helped all of us.
 
Regards
6vett2/3208
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  This is my no means an easy task but requires perseverance and a steady hand.  All engine coolant must be drained from the coolant system, existing heater hoses from the existing heater core from the engine compartment side will have to be removed.  This will undoubtedly require cutting and destroying the existing heater hoses at the heater core.  The fresh air hose will need to be disconnected and moved out of the way  as well as disconnecting the fresh air cable. The four heater core nuts will have to be removed and the engine compartment side of the heater core fiberglass cover will have to be extracted.  From inside the car on the passenger side you will need to disconnect all remaining hose connections as well as the blower motor wire.  From inside the car you will need to pull out the heater core body and the leaking heater core and replace the heater core with a new one.  Reverse the above….a Corbin clamp tool will be needed to complete the R & R of the hoses.  Replace all heater hoses both inside and out and refill with engine coolant and check for leaks.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
Were heat shields over the spark plug wires used on a 290 hp 1959 engine.  I know the shields were used between the exhaust manifolds. I mean the curved ones on the block.  Also were the spark plug wires straight boot over the plugs on a 290hp. The NCRS states they were straight but I can't find any photos or manufacturer of them.  They all have the right angled boots. Thanks Pat

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Page 234 of the Nolan Adams book clearly indicates spark plug wire boot heat shields and 90 degree spark plug boots.  All engines types were subsequently so equipped.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
Hi , my friend is restoring a 59'. During assembly of frame and drive line and installing the driveshaft the rear end pinion will only turn about 60* in either direction and then stops solid. But if you turn the axels they turn ok independent of the pinion. The car rolled fine when he removed it from the sellers trailer. Any thoughts before we take rear end apart. Thanks.

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I suspect the rear suspension is hanging which can affect u joint function. That's why we have rebound straps.   I experienced the same problem recently  with new u joints.......did nothing and the car runs perfectly. 

 

 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  I had a similar thing going on back when I was redoing our '58.  Long story short, once I put the rebound straps on the frame I never had a problem again.  I suggest checking your rebound straps on the rear axle.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

From: Doug Prince, Socal Chapter Advisor:  I too had a similar problem with a 56 with the rear suspension under no load and hanging all the way down. 56 and 57 Vettes had a metal shield underneath the driveshaft tunnel and the forward drive shaft universal and the yoke would interfere with the shield.  By jacking up the rear suspension to ride height solved the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi
 
I have a 1958 Corvette.  If I step on it the back wheels jump up and down.  I've searched several places and no one has traction bars for the 58.  They are available for 53 thru 57 and 61 thru 2012 but not for 58 thru 60.  Where can I get traction bars that fit or can be modified to fit?  You help is appreciated.
 
Ted

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Ted,
 
Traction bars were a very common add on to early Corvettes and mounted under the rear spring. You can still buy them today from Traction Master (TMC corp) in Burbank, Ca. You can find their info on line. 53-59 Traction Masters are all the same. I don't believe they keep any in stock, but they will make set for you.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********

I am restoring a 1960 corvette. My question is that the Ignition cylinder face is off the lock cylinder and how do you reinstall the ignition face back onto the lock cylinder.  The face has one hole and looks like it needs a pin to be inserted where it is needs to be installed.

Gary

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  You will need to insert a paper clip into the small pin hole on the face of the lock cylinder assembly as well as the ignition key at the same time.  Then place all of this into the lock cylinder assembly switch housing. You will need to turn the key slightly for it to fall in place.  To remove the lock cylinder reverse this process.  Why not purchase the Corvette Servicing Guide from one of the Corvette vendors such as Corvette Central or Mid America.  This manual will help you service your '53-'62 Corvette in repair and replacement hints.  But, in this case the information will be in the passenger car service manual.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Gary,

The secret here is that an original key, coded correctly for that particular lock,  must be inserted into the lock tumbler in order to assemble it into the cylinder.  The code you need is a 4 numbers stamped into the back side of the tumbler.

The correctly coded key (if you don't have one) needs to be made on a GM key cutter set to the code and NOT made on a neighborhood hardware key duplicator.

 The reason I noted "if you don't have one" is because:
both an original key has to be inserted into the key slot and a pin the diameter of a paper clip must be inserted into the hole in the lock face in order to take the lock apart in the first place.
Good luck with yur project,

Bill Huffman, Pres,  Michigan Chapter SACC

 

**********

I am needing to replace my tach cable on my 62 corvette. Would you have step by step information on accomplishing this?
 
Thanks
Landry

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Landry,

I am assuming you have a tach drive distributor on your '62.

I also assume that it is exhibiting some sort of symptom that prompts you to believe it's necessary to replace it. Disconnecting the ferrules at each end, pulling the firewall grommet, pulling it out and reassembling is really not much of a problem.

The real aggravation is when you get it back together and it is still noisy/erratic/non-functional or worse yet, it works until the plastic end on your cheap replacement cable breaks off in the tach (old lesson learned the hard way).

 First disconnect the large ferrule at the distributor and attempt to remove the cable only from the cable casing.

If it pulls out OK, clean it with a rag and inspect it for wear or rounding of the crimped ends, kinks or swelling from unwinding.  If it's OK, re-lube it with cable lube (see Paragon/Corvette Central/Mid-America/Echlers/you neighborhood GM dealer).

Re-install the cable & ferrule and start your engine. If the cable is installed with the pull thru collar on the small ferrule-tach side, same proceedure except see if the cable will re-install from the distributor end. (it's easier to work from the top than under the dash, if possible).

 If it now works, GREAT.  If the cable really is defective, buy a quality replacement cable assembly from any of the above and route it same as the original.  If the re-installed cable doen't resolve the issue, listen for the noise(s). Does it come from the gear in the tach-drive distributor or from the tachometer.

 Good luck with your project,

Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

Dear Sirs: 
 
I recnetly completed a body off restoration of my 61 and replaced all wiring harnesses.  I'm now having two electrical problems.  The courtesy light remains on when the ignition switch is turned on and or the car is running, it does not come on when the ignition is off and the door is open?  All other lights and guages work properly.  My second issue is that at times the car will not start (does not turn over), it acts as if the battery is dead, even though the battery is fully charged.  This is an intermittent problem once it decide to turn over it starts rigfht up, could it possible by the ground cable not making could enough contact with the block or a starter issues or something else?   Jim

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Jim,

Forgive me for asking but how does your radio work?   The power lead for the courtesy light is in the same general area as the radio.

Your light is powered as your radio should be.  I believe both have a two prong-T shaped connector.

Regarding the starting issue,   It could be loose clamp on battery terminal (happened to me last summer),  It could be loose ground to engine block,  It could be loose terminal on solenoid,  it could be defective solenoid.

 Oh, the fun of driving the bugs out of a fresh restoration

Isn't it great ??

**********

I am restoring a 1959 Corvette, and when I removed the seats, I found a tag hanging from the seats with the following information on each tag:

BP 12 8 58
MSWB91114E1
3761742-11

These tags are approximately three inches long and one inch wide with rounded corners.  Do you have any idea what these numbers/letters were used for?  Are they part of the build list?

Any information would be appreciated.  Thanks!

George

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

George,
 
I have seen these tags on many original seats over the years. Here's my best guess on what the codes represent.
 
BP 12 8 58 is the date the seats were made....no guess on BP. I suspect your 59 was built in the spring of 59 so the dec.58 date indicates the seats are most likely original to your car.
 
MSWB91114E1 probably represents a vendor part number. It is unlikely that Chevrolet made the seats, but rather they were provided by an outside vender.
 
3761742-11 appears to be a Chevrolet part # and the 11 probably indicates the color .
 
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

I have stripped stud on my front hub on my 62 corvette. Do you have any suggestions how to repair it.

Thanks Gary

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Gary,

Don't even think about repairing a stripped wheel stud, replace it. While you're at it, inspect the rest of your studs. It's really no more expensive to replace 3 than it is to do one,  considering you have already got the wheel torn down.  Wheel studs are splined and press in from the back side of the hub. You will need a press to get them seated squarely.  Either take the stud or a lug nut with you when you go shopping for replacement studs. They all look the same in the bins.  It is possible that the stripped stud is due to an incorrect (Metric) lug nut. Check all your lug nuts on one good stud.   Be sure you inspect & repack the wheel bearings and seal on each hub. Now is the time to avoid the break-down on the road.

Good luck

 Bill Huffman, Pres.  Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Wheel studs are available from any “competent” auto parts store.  The stud itself will need to be pressed out of and then the new one pressed into the wheel hub by a competent machine shop or parts store.  This is not “rocket science” and should be very easy to accomplish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Dear Sirs:

I'm currently looking to acquire a C1 and moving up the learning curve.  The following is a picture of a 283 from a 1959 that has been advertised as numbers matching, correct.  I can clearly see that the exhaust manifold is incorrect.  Is there anything else in the picture that throws up red flags?  I really appreciate your tech help page and will definitely become a member once I find a car.

 Regards,

Clark

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  This picture indicates racing exhaust headers, incorrect ignition wires, chrome plated engine mount, incorrect oil breather cap and no generator tag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Clark,

From what I can see in the picture, you are looking at a small block, 230 HP engine.  It has enough things wrong that you need to start with the basics.   Look at the top left rear for Casting number 3756519 and a casting date that preceeds the build date of the car by at least a month.  Check the stamp pad on the block in front of the right hand valve cover. The stamp pad should have an "F" prefix, a "CQ" suffix and the numbers in between are the engine build date.    Check the intake manifold. The casting number should be 3746829 and it also has a date code.  While you are inspecting, check the date codes on the transmission and the differential casting to see if they are consistent with the numbers matching story.  Generator, starter and water pump all have date codes and the distributor has a date band.   They also need to be the correct part number.Incorrect things I noticed:   chromed front motor mounts & mounting bracket, aluminum valve covers,  they should be orange painted steel with vertical ends and has the word "Chevrolet" stamped on the top surface.  no P/N tag on generator,  headers, not exhaust manifolds, chromed air inlet hose brackets, no spark plug shielding, black painted oil cap, reproduction air cleaner.

 Welcome to the learning curve, 
Bill Huffman, Pres.

Michigan Chapter SACC

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC: 

Hi Clark 
a few more things that are incorrect for the car.
1.  The 4" air hose
2. Fan belt
3. Appears reproduction distributor cover
4. Windshield wiper motor way too bright ( appears repo)
 
Also have some one look at the broach marks on the block.  With this much either wrong or repo,  it may be a good driver.  The price must reflect this.   Thanks Larry

**********

I have a set of hub caps off of a 1960 corvette. How do I tell if they are original from GM or if they are aftermarket?
I find no GM numbers on them. I bought this car in 1984 and sold it about 8 yrs ago. I kept the hub caps. Thank you.
 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The color.  Original will be  blue(ish) in the sun light where reproduction will be more yellow(ish).

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,I have a 1960 with fuel gauge problem,My guage show almost full,I took sender out of tank and manually moved float,guage only moves about 1/8 inch,i put ohm meter on float and get a good range of reading,does this mean my guage is bad?I didn't think guage would move at all if bad,Thanks,Richard

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Richard,

I had similar issues myself just recently.   No matter how full I filled the tank, the gauge over the last driving season went from 3/4 full to 1/2 full then finally to 1/4 full Max.  Replacing the sending unit (because it's easy to get to and relatively inexpensive) helped a little but I finally decided to plunge in and replace the gas gauge. The gas gauge/ temp gauge module comes out as a unit.   Disconnect the battery, get a good light source, and make sure you diagram the connections (digital pics work also) before you start.   If you are patient, you may be able to get it out, fixed & re-installed without dis-assembling  the instrument cluster.   A 1/4 inch drive U-joint will actually allow you access.   Gas gauge internals are available from multiple sources. Just make sure it has the 1960 pointed needle. 
Good luck,

Bill Huffman, President, Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

C1 Corvettes are also notorious for the gas gauge to “go up” about an 8th of a tank when you step on the brake and all the tail lights come on.  The single ground wire in the rear harness is not capable of handling the load and the gas gauge will spike.  Many members in our SoCal SACC club have installed a separate additional ground wire from the sender to the gauge and this seems to help.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I purchased a 1958 Corvette all matching number car that was about 80% completed body off restoration.  I have the car restoration done now except putting the tops on.  The problem I am having is that when I put the original hard top on are put the original convertible top up and fasten the front to the windshield it pulls the frame and rubber off the top of the glass and you can stick a pencil between rubber and frame.  I did not put the windshield on the car it was already installed on the car.  The end post had been sent off I think to Corvette Central and new studs put in plus rechromed.  The car has new windshield, rubber, brackets, screws, etc all from Corvette Central.  My question is are their any adjustment you can make to the windshield?  I have not removed the bottom channel, so I do not know what is under it, are their shims that go under it.  Do you know of any suggestions to help me with this problem?  Wayne

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President: 

Sounds like your windshield frame is broken in the lower corners.  Usually this shows up at the bottom rather than at the top.  My guess is that you will have to remove the windshield and send the pot metal parts to a place like Corvette Central and have them repair them with a steel bracket on the bottom of your original post.  Windshield removal is quite a job. Two 5/16 post are located behind the padded dash on the dog leg.  Then all along the bottom edge of the frame are maybe 12 small nuts that can only be found with a light and small hands on the underside of the dash.  One can do it themselves if they have the time and willing to lay upside down.  An assembly manual for your Corvette will show the bolt locations.


Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Wayne,

The windshield frame pulling away from the glass is not an uncommon problem if your soft top is too tight.  It can also occur if the rear latches are locked down before the front latches are hooked into the windshield post attachment notches.

The real concern is your statement that it occurs when the hardtop is latched.

If this is a hardtop original to the car, this should be a relatively stress free attachment.

In fact, both side side windows should be adjusted so that the height fits the hardtop. The soft top frame should then be adjusted to fit the windows before the canvas is installed.

In regard to shims, there should be a rubber seal under the windshield between the windshield posts.

Also, the windshield post studs fit into slots in the body for minor fore-aft adjustment for clearance to the door post.  If this were mine, I would concentrate on proper hardtop installation first.  Remove the stainless C-section cover to expose the adjustment bracket underneath.  Loosen the fasteners at both ends.  Retighten with the windshield posts adjusted inboard toward each other as far as possible.

 Check the door post to windshield clearances to make sure no fore-aft windshield post adjustment is required.  Mount the hardtop to see if the windshield frame still pulls away from the windshield.  If it doesn't, great.

Reinstall the cover, and adjust the window height.  Move on to the soft top frame adjustment. If it does, you may have to get profession help to investigate other possible causes.  Such as previous body repairs that would impact top attachment points.

 Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC 

**********

Does anyone produce a book or DVD step by step on dissemble and assembly of the hardtop .
 
3251
 
THANKS
 
ED

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Trust me when I tell you you don’t want to go there as you will only open a big can of worms.  Leave this restoration to the Pros and they place adds in the NCRS Driveline Magazine for this service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, My name is Steve, I'm in Australia and have some problems/queirys.
Firstly, I'm trying to remove the windscreen and have all the nuts off but have been told theres a few more hidden away, this is why the thing wont move.
So how do I get to these nuts to remove them? I'm told they are at the ends of the mounting, a difficult to get to thin, suggesting I cut in from the side, a hole, to make  this accessible for removing the nuts? ouch
Next, my paintowrk, recently done, acrylic laquer by PPG, has strange bubbles, not round like a water bubble, I have been told this maybe a substance leaching to the surface after the car had been full paint stripped and may have been in the fibreglass for sometime .The stripping has allowed the "substance" to come to the surface.I've also been told that the only way to fix this is to remove the fibreglass and repace it with new glass".There 7 spots and not in "groups" but randemly placed around the car.About 2-3mm in size.
Any help would be appreciated.
cheers form Australia
Regards
 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  There are windshield frame end studs that you have to remove the nuts from.  You do not need to cut the body…..if the factory put it on then you can get it off.  Your body will have to be completely stripped down to bare glass and regell coated to seal out any underlying problems.  Good luck……..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi

I need some bolt brackets that fit down inside the front of the hood for a 59.  It’s the plates that go down inside the hood where the front hood brackets attach to.   I have a new hood for my car and it is missing the plates that go inside the forward most bracket holes.Any suggestions where I can find the brackets/ plates ?  I tried all the normal Corvette parts houses.
Thanks !!

 Sidney

From:  Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Sidney,

I believe that you are refering to the nut plates located inside the hood assembly on the front outboard on both sides that allow the hood to be bolted to the hinge assemblies. You should be able to reuse the nut plates from your old hood assembly.

They should also be easily fabricated from 1/8 inch steel. 

I would contact whoever you obtained the new hood from and ask them about the missing hardware. 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
Can you tell me if the original keys for a 62 Corvette had a key code stamped in them?
Thanks,Ron

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  That is correct and the keys were made by Briggs & Stratton.  They had a five digit key code number stamped into the “punch out” portion of the keys.  If your Corvette still has the original locks you can obtain the code from the lock bodies.  The keys are now being reproduced.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
Hello !
Recently purchased a '62 with a 383 stroker.  Real fun to drive but under acceleration the pinion elevates and thumping occurs on the drive shaft tunnel.
Seems like all of the remedies have drawbacks in ride quality except maybe a snubber.  Any opinions about how best to fix ?
Thanks,
Gary

From:  Bill Huffman, President of Michigan Chapter: 

Gary,

I'm making an assumption here that you think your car has a stock rear suspension and perhaps too much HP for it to handle.

That may be true, but even with a stock engine, there are lots of things that can make it go thump under hard acceleration.

Let's start with the basics.
  Weak springs in the rear,

  Missing bumper on frame underside over the rear axle, 

  Missing or cut rebound straps between frame wheel hump and rear axle shafts,

  Worn bushings in or missing radius rod/traction bars between frame and top of axle shaft,

  Worn U-joints,

  Worn transmission shaft yoke. While you're at it, make sure you have the 10 T yoke spline. It's stronger.

  Worn/loose differential pinion or bearing,

  Loose or mis-located exhaust system components.

    Your car most likely has 2 1/2 inch pipes and there may be interference in the oval frame X openings

    or between the mufflers and the rear shocks.

 Worn shocks also allow too much wheel hop.

 Missing or undersize rear torsion bar or worn T-bar bushings.

Unfortunately, most "restorations" are more cosmetic than functional.

 

Good luck in diagnosing the real cause of the car's symptoms.

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor: 

Out here in “good old Southern California” there are a slew of old cars running a set of 50’s and 60’s era Traction Master traction bars that were added to the stock rear suspensions of many C1 Corvettes.. The addition of these traction bars went a long way in solving rear axle wind up.  You might be able to find a pair for a C1 on Ebay.  Also be sure you Corvette still has the original rear sway bar and has new or near new bushings.  Lastly your rear leaf springs could be tired and are in need of a competent rebuild.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi:   My name is tom i'm restoring a 1960 corvette. the question i would like to ask is, if they did a warranty eng. what do they do for the stamp on the right front of the eng.I have the right eng. casting #3756519 date#f39              vetts.vin#00867s101113  the # on the front right side is N369883CAL i would like some information if you could.   thank you. TOM
 

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Tom,
 
Your car was built on Oct. 28, 1959. The 3756519 block is the correct casting # for a 1960 Corvette. You say your block casting date is F39 which is June 3, 1959 ...... seems to me a bit early for a late Oct. built car. Casting dates do not use small case letters. Could your casting date be I 39 indicating Sept,3, 1959? That would be a good date for your car.
 
Regarding the stamping N369883CAL. My guess is that the engine was rebuilt at some point in time. The block was decked and the stamping represents the the builders reference# or invoice#.
 
In summary, I would guess  if your casting date is I 39 the the block is original to your car. If the date is F 39 I would say it is a replacement block.
 
Chip Werstein
 

 

**********

Need a couple questions answered and thanks in advance !!

 

1.       Is there a kit available or do you have any suggestions on converting an original windshield wiper pump system from the cable system to a more modern set up?

2.      On the convertible top.  I am currently restoring the car.  I ordered a new canvas for the top and noticed that the convertible top frame has a “V” in the rear deck area where it meets the trunk.  Obviously I know the 61 and 62 trunks have a rise in the trunk which the “V” accommodates.  My question is could it be possible that a 59 Convertible top frame also has a “V” in the rear deck area.  And,  do you know if the canvas for a 59 convertible top will fit this frame if, in fact, it is a later year model, 61 or 62 with the “V”?   Reason is I want to go back with a Turquoise convertible top since it was only offered in 59, but not sure if this frame on the car ( currently with a black canvas top) is the correct frame and if the 59 Turquoise canvas will fit it.

Thank you !!

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  If your convertible top frame has a “V” in it the correct 1959 Convertible top canvass will not work.  Do you have an incorrect convertible top frame or an incorrect convertible top frame canvass?  Either way you have got a problem here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

We are restoring a 1959 corvette fuel injection 290 hp  car.  When reading the information on radiator caps the rstoration guide says that all corvettes of that year have a 7psi cap.  However when trying to purchase one the companies all say the FI car used a 13 psi cap.  Does anyone know which is used?  Thanks Pat

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

According to the NCRS 58-60 judging manual all 58-60 cars with copper radiators used a 7 lb. cap. 1960's with aluminum radiator used a 13 lb. Since all 59's had copper radiators your car should use a 7 lb cap.
 
Chip

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
We just sent in our application today to join the Solid Axle Club.  We are building a fuel injection engine for a 59 corvette vin #6813 with a 290 HP.  The birthday of the car was April 22, 1959 which appears to be a late model.  Our question is concerning the heads.  According to Noland Adam's Restoration Guide book there was a change from the 770 cast heads to the heads with straight valve cover bolt patterns somewhere in mid-March 59 so this is where we are confused.  Can anyone help us determine the correct head for this engine?
Thank you.
Regards

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Straight across valve cover hold down hole heads were casting number 3767465 for late 1959 Corvettes.  Your Corvette probably came with these heads on it based upon your build date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*********

Hello what is location on numbers on engine block ,Borg Warner 4 speed, chassis, and rear end car is a 1962 corvette 327 , 4 speed  thank you for anything you can tell me.
Joe

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Engine stamping is on the front passenger side of the cylinder block and contains the origin and date built and engine type.  Additionally there will be the VIN number stamped to the right of the build date.  The transmission will be stamped with origin, build date and shift change on the intermediate bearing housing right by the rear shift lever.  The rear axle housing will have the date built and axle ratio and type stamped on the passenger side of the rear axle carrier facing towards the front of the car.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I have a problem with caster on my 1957 corvette . The tops of my front tires are in to much to adjust out .A old body man told me that I need to put the car on a frame rack and,pull the front cerdo down on both sides to bring it back into alignment. Does that right to you? Thanks Jim

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  No this is not how you align a C1 front end.  The caster and camber are adjusted by an eccentric in the upper outer A arm bushings.  Correct measurements are spelled out in the ST-12 but you need to find a front end alignment shop that is competent with old cars.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Huffman, President of Michigan Chapter:

Jim,

The June 2002 edition of Vette Magazine had an article by Richard Newton entitled "The Mystery Alignment".

It is a 3 page illustrated article that describes the alignment of C-1 Corvettes in detail.

I supplied a copy to the local GM dealer so that their alignment technician could align both of my 1960 Corvettes.

You should be able to obtain a copy from Vette Magazine or a google search on the web.

Good luck,

Bill

**********

To set the correct time in my 1955 Corvette-I just push in and hold until the correct time comes around.  Is this correct?

 

Thank you

From: Chip Werstein, Southern California Chapter Advisor: 

Jack,
 
I am pretty sure a 55 clock is the same as a 57. To set the correct time pull the stem out and rotate to the correct time. The stem is spring loaded and will pull back in when released.
-Chip

 

 

 

 

 


From: Bruce Fuhrman:  SACC Secretary:

Hi Jack,
   No, if you want to reset the '55 clock, you pull out the stem and turn. It is the same mechanism as the '53 and '54, however, re-wired for 12 volts. If it is inop, I would recommend a quartz conversion of the guts which is much more reliable. I had mine done about 14 years ago and it has not missed a beat since!
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I am a member of SACC, and recently encountered a problem with vehicle starting properly.  My frame off, professionally restored C1, has the original numbers matching engine and drive tran.  The car was running great until two weeks ago, when I attempted to start the car.   I placed the key in the ignition switch, turned the key from LOCKED to OFF, then to ON.  As soon as the key touched the ON position, the engine started cranking at an excessive RPM, where you could hear the starter engaging.  I quickly shut off the engine, and proceed to retry this and found eventually moving the key from LOCK to just OFF, the car began to start at the excessive RPM, no longer at the ON position.  Recommendations were that the ignition switch was shorted and replace it.  I installed another switch, 577 Delco Remy, attaching the female connectors in positions identified.  I used the battery cut-off switch to ensure no power during this action.  After I removed the old switch I found it was a non Delco Remy, which leads me to believe the prior owner had a problem with ignition previously.  I thought the problem was fixed when I was able to start the car properly and checked several times afterwards with same success.  I drove the car approximately 15 miles the following morning to a local Corvette show.  When I was about to leave, I encountered the cranking issue once again, when turning the key from OFF to ON.  Car began to crank at an excessive RPM and would not remain running, just kept spinning and spinning with starter engaged.  I wound up having car flat bedded home.  Could the problem be in the solenoid causing a magnetic field condition in the ignition switch?  If not, what else should I look for to fix this strange problem.  I am not convinced that there was 3 defective ignition switches, something else is likely the true cause.  This is a single, 4 barrel, WCFB vehicle, 230 HP with 3 speed manual transmission.  Nothing has been changed from original factory.  Coil, ballast resistor, voltage regulator, etc., everything is correct original parts.

Marlo

Yorktown Heights, NY 10598

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Marlo,
The real fun of having a fully restored older Corvette is working the "gremlins" out of it.
Transport on flatbeds is part of the fun and only a true enthusiast can tolerate it and come back for more.
 
First, the switch.
Now that you have the correct ignition switch, make sure the engine wiring harness is wired correctly by checking the 1960 assembly manual.
It is available from many sources. Mine came from Mid-America and is invaluable.
One word of caution--- the wire leads to the ammeter are reversed on the illustration. Do the reverse shown.
 
Second, the starter.
Because it is a DC motor, the starter operating RPM is directly proportional to battery voltage. 
Motor power or torque is dependent on armature winding wire diameter & number of windings on the armature.
The starter may look "correct" in every way (P/N & date code) but mine was rebuilt by Master Parts with the internals of the 
later big block starter armature for more powerful starting. That may make it run faster therefore make more noise than might be considered normal.
There are several things that need to be checked.
   Check your battery voltage.    
   Check the engine RPM with starter engaged.
   Check that the starter drive pinion engages & retracts freely when engaging the flywheel ring-gear.
     It sound like the starter pinion may have failed to disengage from the ring gear, which may mean some starter misalignment..
    Check the starter nose bushing to make sure that it is correctly installed & has no adverse wear.
    A poorly centered nose bushing would create a tight pinion / ring-gear fit.
I would'nt hesitate in contacting whoever did the work on your frame off, professionally restored C1. Pros usually stand behind their work.
Best of luck to you.
Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

**********

I own a 1960 Corvette  but am not a member of this forum (hadn’t seen it before this evening), I just wonder how do I determine how my Vette came out of the factory ………. Interior color, gearbox, rear end ratio, exterior color, hp and other options included. I know what all the codes are but don’t know how to determine what my car was. Where do I find theses codes?

 Thanks for your time

 Mick

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President: 

Mick,

 

Don't wish to disillusion you, but a '60 Corvette did not come with a factory installed Trim tag.  So, unless you have the car's original build sheet or window invoice, there is no conclusive means to know what color, equipment or options that were on your car.

 

However, if you  know what to look for and where to look on your car, there are some "indicators"  that can help you determine many of these.  If you can list the more important of these, we can try and help you look for the answers.

 

FYI, the Solid Axle Corvette Club is not a "forum", but a national club dedicated to C-1 Corvettes.  Members maintain this site as a service to the membership, at large.  We are pleased to assist non-members, but as a new owner hope you will consider joining.

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Mick,

I totally agree with the previous writer that were no RPO tags on a 1960 Corvette. However, there are a few clues that are key information.  The first is the VIN number and it's location on the car.

    The NCRS or the Corvette "birthday books", which can be found on-line, will give you your car's birthday within +/+/1 day when you input your VIN number.

     All "correct" part numbers and component or assembly dates on the car must be dated from approx  3 months to about 1 week prior to that date to even be considered "original".

    That list includes engine block, heads, intake, bell housing, flywheel, water pump, starter, generator, transmission, differential, hardtop and many more.

     Engines & differentials have usage or application codes that also must match.

      The second clue may be a letters in chalk under the paint behind the seats or on the trunk bulkhead that indicate the color it was to be painted.  I found original color on mine under the front grill surround trim, untouched even after at least 8 paint jobs
As for "original" RPO options, If they pass the part number / date code / usage code test, look for unused holes w/o grommet or with a reinforcement plate riveted in, irregular or enlarged cuts around components or mis-matched RPO components.   As an old Corvette owner, have fun with your car and drive it. Join a local club and ask them your specific questions.   SACC is a national organization dedicated to people who drive their C-1's. You should consider joining us.

Bill Huffman, Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

 

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  Actually, it might be just a bit misleading saying the color is behind the seat.  On the 1958 - 1960 the paint color is in the trunk, on the bulkhead, left hand side.  On the 1961 - 1962 it is behind the passenger seat on bulkhead.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

 

**********
 

1960 Corvette Dual Quad Solid Lifters 270 HP

What temperature Thermostat should be used 160, 180 or ?
Also, Torque setting for the Goose neck bolts?
Thank you, Vince
3484 

from: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Vince, the caution decal on my 1960 states that a 170 degree thermostat is installed in the vehicle.  Since overheating has been an issue with these automobiles, I would not run with a higher temperature thermostat.

In regard to the water inlet attachment, I have seen aluminum intake manifolds with both bolts or studs & nuts. The aluminum is only capable of taking 50-60% of the torque that a cast iron manifold will withstand.

If it was mine, I would install thermostat housing stud set P/N 241212 from Corvette Central or 719K from Paragon Reproductions to eliminate the possibility of stripping the aluminum threads.  

Torque the nuts to the spec shown on the attached chart.Good luck & enjoy the ride.                 Bill Huffman, Pres MI SACC

 

**********

I have a 327/300 hp matching numbers engine in my 62 vette. The engine developed a clatter noise from the right cylinder head, when sitting in the car, driving around 45 miles/ hr and tends to subside when parked for about 5 minutes. I removed the valve covers and reajusted the hydraulic valves with the engine running at idle. Backed off each until I would hear the clatter, tighten until that went away then one more turn.  Replaced valve cover, took her for a drive and still the same noise.  Thinking it might be a bad lifter I replaced all on that side plus replaced the push rods and rocker arms, washers and nuts.  Still the same noise at around 45 miles/hr. I have about 45 pounds of oil pressure cold and warm 38/40.  Can someone help.
 
Frustrated

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  To start with you might go get a compression test gage, remove the spark plug on each cylinder one at a time, (coil disconnected), have cousin Eddy hold the gage against the opening.  Turn the engine over.  They should all read about the same.  If one reading is off, there is a good chance that a piece of carbon is holding the valve open.  Also, the ticking could be a piece of carbon on the top of the piston.  One trick then is to insert a compressed air hose down into the cylinder through the spark plug hole blow some air through there, and sometimes it moves the carbon to a different location so it blows out the exhaust valve.  Hope this trick works for you.  Enjoy the car.  Glad you drive it regularly.

Max

**********

I cannot find the VIN # on my 1959 corvette, I have cleaned the top of left frame rail under driver seat are and it shows no signs of ever being stamp. This is a hardtop car is there anywhere else The VIN could be found?
Thanks

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter President: 

Adam,

The simple answer to your question is 2 places on a 1959 Corvette:

The VIN plate should be attached to the front body surface of the driver door opening, just below the top door hinge with two small phillips head screws.   
The VIN number should be stamped onto the top surface of the left side frame rail box section, located near or just forward of the driver seat.The VIN plate was moved from the door opening to being resistence welded to the steering column under the hood in the 1960 model year sometime between late Oct and mid-Dec 1959.

The last 5 digits of the VIN number began being stamped onto the engine pad sometime after Jan 1960.Without taking the body off the frame, the best way to view the VIN number stamping is on a hoist, a good light and a mechanics mirror. Make sure the area is clean & dry.   It's also possible to make a tracing using paper and a soft pencil or crayon after you find it..Good luck with your verification,
Bill Huffman, Pres. MI SACC
 

From Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  I agree with the above however, there is one located on the rear cross member as well, right hand side.  The one under the drivers seat is sort of located below the hole in the body floor.  Usually with the age of our Corvettes being now, one will have to remove the body and wire brush the frame.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

**********

I have what I think is a 58 master brake cylinder. All the correct casting #'s seem to be there but the front plug on the cylinder does not have the stamping 5454480-320-G.Was this # stamped on the front of all Corvette master cylinders or is this one for a different vehicle? I doubt if anyone changed the plug on a rebuild but anything is possible.
 
Also the NCRS Judging Guide shows 2 different hardtops for the 58, a early style and a later style. Does anyone know at what serial # the change was made or are both style tops acceptable on the 58 for judging?
 
Thanks
Mike

From: Bill Huffman, Michigan Chapter of SACC President: 

Mike,

I took your question as an opportunity to go check the original master cylinder in my 1960.

At first glance, with a bright lignt, I could faintly see the numbers 44.

First with a wire brush, then a brass bristle brush, then some Calyx dressing I was able to see 5454480-_80-20. 

Depth of the stamped numbers seems to vary.  You may be dealing with the same issues.

 You didn't say how long you've owned the car but It's possible that you have a re-sleeved cylinder with the GM P/N removed.

The stamped P/N is on the end of the reservoir not the cylinder itself. If your master cylinder really lacks the proper P/N stamp, Your question really should be addressed to NCRS as to judging consequences.Here in Michigan, we have several crossover members who belong to both SACC & NCRS. We SACC guys drive them till they need fixing then call the NCRS guys to make sure we're doing it properly, with the right parts.

 

 In regard to your hardtop, if your local NCRS guys can't answer your question, my advise is to contact Glassworks at http://www.thehardtopshop.com  
They did an outstanding job rebuilding my hardtop, they do NCRS workshops all over the country and they are open to questions.

Good luck & enjoy the ride,

 Bill Huffman,

Pres. Michigan Chapter SACC

 

 

 

**********

I am restoring a 1960 corvette and have a question regarding installing a new grab bar. There must be a trick that I am missing. The brackets for mounting the grab bar are in place on both sides however with then in place there is no room to slide the grab bar on the brackets to attach it. If I remove the brackets and attach them to the grab bar there is not enough room to screw the brackets in place with the bar attached. Bottom line, there is just not enough room to install the new grab bar.

Any suggestions for getting over this hurdle is greatly appreciated.

Thank you
Tom

From: Bill Huffman, President of Michigan Chapter of SACC: 

Tom,

The solution is very simple.

1) Install the grab bar end brackets to the dash & tighten the bolts.

2) Install the grab bar eschusions over the grab bar/ cover assemly approx 3 inches from each end.

3) Make sure that the 1/4 in nut plates are properly located on each end of the grab bar.

4) The grab bar/ nut plate asm then drops down onto the brackets.

5) Install the 2- 1/4 in bevel headed screws on each end of the grab bar.

6) Make sure the split end of the grab bar cover is tucked up between the nut plate & bracket so that the cover lies smooth when you tighten the beveled screws.

    When I re-did my cover, I actually used thread and needle to sew the cover ends over the nut plate to keep the cover smooth.

7) Push the eschusion plates over the cover till they contact the curved dash plate then fasten to dash with chromed phillips head screws.

 

It took longer to write out the instructions than it should take you to install the grab bar.

Good luck & enjoy the ride,

Bill Huffman

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I recently purchased my 1933 Corvette.  It is a 1933 Chevy 3 window coupe with a 1954 Corvette motor under the hood.  It does have the 3 Carter side draft carbs.  Do I need to add anything to my fuel to keep it running good?  The previous owner of 50+ years added Marvel Mystery Oil to his gasoline.  Many thanks for your time.  Mark

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Tech Advisor: 

Today’s gasoline has 10% alcohol in it which is very detrimental to old carbs and fuel systems.  Marvel Mystery oil is an excellent additive to use with this garbage that they sell us today which is Gasohol.  Add one once of Marvel or common ATF for every gallon of gasoline added to your car and this will stop all the bad things that gasohol causes to our old cars.  It flat out works and is cheap insurance to keep our old cars running like new.

Doug

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 
I have a 58 with a leaking differential gasket. Also, from what I am told, the rear end is a fabricated positraction because someone in the past apparently welded the spider gears so that both tires turn equally all of the time. I want to fix both of these issues. Can someone share with me some resource information or instructions on removing the rear axles, fixing the spider gears, and pulling the "pig" in order to install a new gasket? Thanks very much. Jeff

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Welded up spider gears are an old drag race trick that is a sure fire way to wear out a set of rear tires.  You will need to locate a good used third member that can either be a positraction unit or a “one legger.”  The ST-12 Corvette Service Manual has an excellent section for the inspection and overhaul of the complete rear axle assembly.  A number of special tools will be needed if you decide to do the work yourself.  Rear axle housing gaskets are readily available from any good auto parts store or Paragon and Corvette Central.  The safe bet for you would be to have professional rear axle service and repair facility do the setting up of the rear axle gears and bearings.  Good luck.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I am in the final stages of the restoration of my 1960 corvette and I have a question regarding the soft top. can you tell me where the hold up straps are supposed to attach to?  The company that installed the top had no idea and screwed them into the top cover (hatch) that covers the top when retracted.
thanks ---Ron

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi;   The front of the strap attach to the steel cover on the inside of the top (about 5/8" from the top of the cover.  The other end attaches to the bottom bow about where the support for the rear window ends. ( about 3 inches to the side of the window on each side.)  The strap is about 9 inches long.  They go around the back of the top to hold it up.  This was originally put in to hold the back of the top up for those cars that had power tops.  If you have trouble call Al Knoch Interiors 1-800-880-8080 ( they should have some drawings)  Good Luck Larry

 

**********

What year, or years did the valve covers have the casting flaw?  I know people did not like them, but I've heard lately they are becoming more valuable.
Thanks, C.

From: Larry Richter, founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi The casting flaw came on cars in the early 67 model years.  The first evidence is about 1200 in the 67 model year. For the next 10,000 + or - they could have either one.  The mold was broke thought the o in Corvette.  Thanks Larry

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
I did purchase a 1962 corvette and the vin number is 20867 S 102245 and the engine has the following numbers stamped on the engine pad # 102245 F 1071 RF These numbers are very light and it is hard to see them. The block has a cast number of 3782870 and a date code ( I 221...Sept-22- 1961?) I do not under stand the number 1 before the RF. The car had fuel injection and the person I bought the car from put a carburetor on the car and I have the fuel injection that came off the car. Should I think about a re stamp on the engine pad, if the numbers are correct, because they are faded? Could you please tell me what day the car was built? The rear end has a cast number of 3789812 with a large P and a code date of I 201, I have not looked at the rear end ratio yet. I am new to the corvette family and will become a member of the solid axle club. I live in Corona, CA and who would a local contact? 
Thanks for any help,
Dave

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Dave,
 
Your 62, Vin # 2245 was built on Nov.3, 1961. The pad stamping seems to have an extra 1 in it. Is it possible that since the stamping is so light that it could be F 1011 0r F1027 or F1017? Perhaps the block was lightly decked in the past which would explain the faint numbers.
 
In order to restamp the block, it would be becessary to remove/diassemble the engine to have the block surfaced smooth so that the pad could be broached correctly and then re-stamped. Seems like a lot of work for some numbers.
 
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

Hello,
I have owned four new Corvette's and my current car is a C6 Hatchback Coupe.
I have question on the 1956 Corvette.
Was the headlight bezel painted body color on the very early 1956 Corvette's produced?
Thank You,
Tom

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  According to the most recent version of the 1956-57 NCRS judging manual, early 56's to aprox. serial # 1360 have headlamp bezels painted body color. From 1360 to aprox 1600 the bezels can be either painted or chrome. After 1600 all were chrome. 
Chip

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Can you tell me the proper way to adjust the top for a 62 corvette.  The frame hinge over the door on both sides will not straighten out.  Thanks Bill
 

From: Larry Richter, Founding treasurer of SACC:  Hi:  You first need to examine the frame that all of the hinge points are not loose.  Then ( you are not going to like this) take the canvas off and adjust the frame to the car.  All cars are a little different. If you need new rubber now is the time to replace it. Next do the following steps (1) make sure the front will latch and not pull the windshield out of its frame, and fits correctly all the way across the windshield.  (2) the area over the door glass needs to the straight so the window will roll all the way up. (3) the latches on the back need to be latched.  Some adjustment can be made on these latches. If this still will not work the frame is either the incorrect frame for your 62 or it is bent. It is best to send it out and have a professional do this.  When all of this is complete you are set to put on the new(yes new) canvas.  You may want to have a professional do this.  Good luck Larry Richter

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I am trying to service my friend’s 1962.  Can you tell me where to find oil specifications and capacities for the transmission (4 speed), engine (base engine) and differential?  Everything I have checked does not go back to the straight axle vettes.

 Thanks for any info you can provide.

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Bill;
 
All 62 Corvettes had a 5 quart pan and 1 quart oil filter for a total of 6 quarts. After 50 years you may want to confirm that the original pan is is still in place and that your dip stick is correct. Passenger car pans are 4 quart. I always fill and install the oil filter canister first and then put the remaining 5 quarts in the motor checking after 3 for indication of oil on the bottom af the dipstick and again after 4 to be certain the dipstick is reading 1 qt low.
 
As for the 4 speed and rear end. Fill them up until oil begins to run out of the filler hole. If the car has a position rear end be sure to use limited slip gear oil.

 

 

 

**********

Recently had seals and gaskets replaced on my ‘62.  Also a HB Sleeve was added.  Small leaks from pre repair turned in the form of bigger leaks, cleaner oil mainly from gasket areas.  Silicone was added but did not correct the problem.  My ASE master tells me that the best way to solve the problem is to replace the pan and cover.  I think that “someone” may have tried to separate the parts by prying them and damage occurred.  The question is, pans seem to be essentially the same from ‘57 –‘79 “327 base engine”.  Most replacements are 4 quart capacity and the original was 6 quart with oil filter.  Is the reduced capacity OK for the engine?  Some suggest a different pump pick up and screen.  As an aside, my mechanic strongly suggests that we not use after market chrome parts, in his words “junk”.  I’m not into chrome either but the parts are more readily available.  Suggestions on where I can get the most reliable replacement part without breaking the bank will be greatly appreciated.  Howard

From: Doug Prince, SoCal SACC Advisor:  Many people , including younger mechanics, do not understand that GM changed the design and dimensions of the small block Chevy oil pan and timing cover.  Most oil leaks occur because the wrong size oil pan to timing cover gasket is used.  Replacement gaskets sets will usually have two front oil pan to timing cover gaskets.  The correct gasket for the 1962 oil pan is the LARGER one.  Corrrect replacement 1962 five quart oil pans are available from Paragon Reproductions, 800-882-4688.  If your pan and timing cover are butchered and bent no amount of silicone will fix the problem   Order the following parts if yours are junk.  57-62 oil pan 5780K, oil pan gasket set 13111K, 56-62 timing chain cover 6736.  What horsepower is the engine in your car?  Low performance hydraulic cam cars had 6 inch harmonic balancers and special high performance cars with solid lifters used 8 inch balancers.  The correct timing cover tab will have to be ordered based upon the size of your harmonic balancer.  Call the parts rep at Paragon to be sure you get the correct timing cover tab.  You will need to install a new harmonic balancer seal in the new cover.  Solid lifter special high performance cars also had a windage tray with special main cap bolts and the pan had a trap door.  Doubtful that you will want to go this route but you should know what is correct.

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Howard,
 
 
Replacement/reproduction pans and timing covers are available fron the various Corvette suppliers if that is the course of action you wish to take. You have not indicated where the pan is leaking.......if it's the front in could be an incorrect front pan gasket. Rear COULD indicate rear main seal problem which has nothing to do with the pan. If it is leaking from the rails, which I doubt,they could be bent.....however they can be straightened quite easily and a good quality gasket (perhaps one with a metal insert) and sealer should take up any remaining slop.
 
 
I don't think you can make an accurate accessment with out removing the parts and determining  the origin of the  leak/leaks. One last thought. Check the valve cover gaskets. They are prone to leak at the rear lower edges, run down the block and appear to be coming from the pan. Don't get hung up on a couple small leaks, These are 50+ year old cars and they all leak something.

 

**********

Please pass on my sincere thanks to the "experts" for the guidance on my last questions.
 
I have a few more based on their comments if you could please pass along.
 
Thanks to everyone !  having these resources is so valuable and appreciated
 
Sidney  3542
 
 
questions regarding a 59 Vette
appreciate the response
 
I am trying to determine the originality of the engine
 
most of the numbers are gone off the block VIN plate but I do have the first 4 numbers which are
F 522 F.  The other numbers are not visible
 
also, the engine casting numbers on the back on the engine drivers side are GM 3731548
 
on top of the engine  E 217  or E 277 ( looks most like E 277)
 
under the radiator hose  number  G 19
 
Can you possibly give some guidance on the motor and the possibility of the originality of it?
 
thank you so much
 
Sidney  3542

From; Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  F 522 F   engine stamping indicates Flint Block assembled May 22,1957. We know it's a 57 block because of the 3731548 casting number and E 21 7 date.  F tells us it is a 283 passenger or truck motor with 2 bbl carb and powerglide. I must assume the E 21 7 is the block casting date found on the passenger side rear of the block and indicates the block was cast May 21 1957. Note that it was assembled the next day which is not unusual. Sorry to inform you that this is not the original block for your car.

 

 

 

 

**********

On my 58,  is it possible to have a "59" in the VIN  number and still be a 58?  my VIN number is J59S102952.  I have documentation back to 1981 where it was registered as a 1958 but by research saw where the 2nd and 3rd digits represent the model year.  The car has louvers on the hood, spears on the trunk, and as best I can determine is truly a 58.  But tonight discovering the information on the VIN,  I am now confused and/or concerned.  Can you help ?
 
thanks
 
3542  Sidney

From: Mike McCloskey SoCal Advisor:  It appears that someone put a '58 hood on your '59 which, according to the VIN was built in about the first third of '59 production.  To confirm that your trunk never had the spears, look on the underside for mounting nubs where the speed nuts were attached.  I'll bet they are not there and it is, in fact, a '59 trunk lid..
Mike McCloskey, So Cal SACC '58 - '60 Tech Advisor

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Sidney,
 
Mike McCloskey has given you a good tip on the trunk lid, but there are many other differences between 58's aand 59's.
 
1     59 has traction bars over the rear axle. 58 does not.
 
2     58 instruments are different from 59 and the low horse motors have rev counters in the tach faces.
 
3     Seat covers and door panels are different.
 
4     Hub caps are different. 59 has slots, 58 doesn't
 
5     59 has package tray. 58 doesn't
 
6     58 has metal supports under the fender spears. 59 doesn't
 
There are probably more differences, but if this were my car I would make an attempt to read the vin # on the frame. It is located on the top of the drivers side frame rail aprox under the drivers seat. It is stamped in the frame twice, You will need to sand/clean the area. Then with luck you will be able to read it with a mirror and flashlite. Since vin tags can be changed on these early cars with only 2 screws, I think it is important for you to determine what you have. A 58 with a 59 vin and paperwork is not a good thing and could cause you problems in the future.
 
You could also check the casting dates and stampings and date codes on the engine block, heads, distributor, transmission and rear end. Although these things could have been changed over the years, you might find something that could be helpful. Perhaps you could find a SACC member in your area who would be willing to help you inspect the car. Good Luck.

From Bill Herron, past Treasurer of SACC:  One more big difference for 58: the trunk area has fiberglass (early ones are metal!) panels covering holes in the left and right rear trunk floor for access to the exhaust system. 59-62s did not have these holes; the floor was solid.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Guys
I have a 61 red corvette with black interior is there a correct color my wheels should be.
 
  Thanks

From: Brad Bean, SACC VP:  Exterior car color on 61's. So... Roman Red, it is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  C-1 Corvette wheels were dipped in semi gloss black and in 1961 the front sides were painted to match the body color, in your case roman red. There was no attempt made to prevent the color from blowing thru the wheel so there should be some evidence of overspray on the backs of the wheels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I have owned corvette J59 S100146 since March 1975 and I have the 739 block which was cast on June 17 1958 (F17 8) and the engine was assembled date of aug 14 1958 (F 814 CU)  now I would like to acquire the correct dated heads and I know the dates are not judged by NCRS  but none the less I want to do this correctly 
Question
as you are no doubt aware there were 3748770 heads produced in June 1958 with X 58 on the side but in order to keep the engine build (dates) in sequence would it be better to have a 550 head cast in July 1958 without the X 58 markings
as far as I can tell the car was built on sep 11- 1958 that may explain why there is nearly a 1 month gap from engine assembly date to the build date some have told me that the plant may have shut down for two weeks to switch from 58 to 59 productiion  this as you can see is the 146 th 59 corvette none the less what would be best June 1958 770 heads or July 1958  550 heads for an August 14 build date on a June 17 casting on the block
Thanks your help is very much appreciated
 
Philip

 

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter advisor:  According to the newest edition of The Corvette Birthday Book, your car was built 9-23-58. I have contacted a friend to see if he may have some heads for you. You can also contact Joe Marquez 805-929-3910, Dave Sokolowski 310-329-5334 and Rick Yousuf 310-384-7900.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I am in the process of redoing the interior of my 58 in Charcoal and can not seem to match the interior paint with the new seats. The new seat color matches the old seat color perfectly but the Charcoal paint sold by the Corvette Suppliers does not match the seats or the original dash parts. I have a garage full of spray cans I bought trying to find a match but with no luck. Would anyone know what the exact color is and where I might obtain it?

Thanks
Mike

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  If the interior was indeed charcoal, the paint would match the exterior car paint, not the seats and dash.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I've recently become the proud owner of a '62 Corvette.  It has the original engine, although it was rebuilt in '95.  I continue to hear that I should be concerned about what fuel to use, additives to include, etc.  Premium gas in my area is all 93 octane.  What should I be doing and why?  Thanks.  David

From:  Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  You should be so lucky as to have 93 octane available to you as we can only get 91 octane in California.  You did not mention what horsepower engine that you have in your Corvette.  Is it low compression hydraulic cam 10.5 or high compression solid lifter 11.25 but the answer is relatively irrelevant since todays gas is of such poor quality.  In my opinion additives do not really help the quality of today’s gasoline’s  except for the addition of 1 once of automatic transmission fluid (ATF) per gallon of gasoline.  Today’s gasoline is produced with 10% alcohol (Gasohol) and is really detrimental to older cars fuel systems.  Gasohol attracts water and when combined with gasoline produces an acid (salitic) that readily attacks pot metal and aluminum carburetors as well as eats up rubber gas lines and o-rings.  ATF inhibits this deterioration and will prolong the life of carburetors and rubber fuel lines.  At this concentration it WILL NOT foul spark plugs or emit any exhaust smoke.  Engine detonation may occur if you are aggressive with ignition timing so this a trial and error situation as backing off the initial advance will help with this problem but will effect engine performance.  I have never found so called octane boosters to work at all and only contributed to fouled out spark plugs.

 

 

 

**********

I just had my 1960 corvette painted black with silver coves I just wanted to know are the faux air scoops on the front semi black, flat black or stay the same black as the rest of the car
 
 
 Thanks Brian  #3514
 

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Advisor:  Semigloss.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi, can you tell me if the temperature sending unit on a base engine 1961 Corvette should be painted engine color or was it installed after the engine was painted?   Thank you for your time,   Mike

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Mike,  During painting at the engine assembly plant in Flint, all of the important tapped holes were filled with plastic plugs. Items like temperature senders were installed on the engine “dress” line just before installation in a chassis. So your sending unit should look new but without paint. As I recall, most were brass.

 Cheers, Noland

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  An excellent question for sure.  We know the thermostat housing and bolts were painted Chevy Orange, however, I believe the temperature sending unit would have not been painted as it would have been installed later down the engine assembly line in Flint.  This is just my opinion as others may chime in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi
I am not a member but would like to join.
I have a technical question about the function of the P. V. C. valve that came with my 62 Corvette 340 Hp 327 that was originally purchased in California. The car is all stock and serves as my weekend driver around Connecticut.
The question is how does it effect performance and what negative (if any) problems are there if it malfunctions or is taken off ?. I understand it's purpose was to eliminate the crankcase vent under California Emissions law in 1962 but I assume it was not a desired feature in other states.
Alan

From:  Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

The CA PC valve replaced the overboard draft tube which vented the crankcase fumes, sometimes toxic??? It is connected to the intake manifold which is a vacuum and the valve acts as a vacuum regulator to control the proper vacuum to the crankcase so as to not suck out all the oil! The only negative performance characteristic in a minute loss in intake manifold pressure (vacuum). I live in CA and have a '54 which had a puff of white smoke coming out of
the draft tube at idle. I added a PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system and it works fine. The crankcase fumes are now ingested into the combustion chambers and burned with the firing of the piston. By the way, all cars now produced in the USA have had this system since he 60's. I would not disconnect it.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  RPO 286 was a mandatory option in 1961 for all California Corvettes that were sold new in the state.  PCV valves became standard equipment in all 1962 Corvettes that were sold new in California.  PCV valves will not, in my opinion, cause any loss of performance to your engine.  The PCV valve system will actually keep the inside of your engine cleaner as it reburns unburned vapors that get past the piston rings.  I would recommend leaving it alone. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
 

I still have one question that did not get answered, how do you tell if you have an original fuel car.  I was told that if there was a  solid rod coming out from the fire wall for the throttle that indicated you had a fuel car.   I took your suggestion and mailed in my application to the Solid Axle Club.  Appreciate your assistance.

 Thanks,

 Brenda

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor: 

I assume that the car does not have the original engine with the correct engine type stamps on the block.  All 1957 fuel injected Corvettes had a round shaped bellcrank rod that attaches to the firewall.  Carburetor Corvettes were flat shaped.

 

In addition all 1957 fuel injected Corvettes had ignition wiring harnesses that differed from their carburetor counterparts.  There is a built in starting bypass system in the ignition harness that provided 12 volts to the fuel meter starting solenoid.  This harness also provided 12 volts to the electric choke cover on the air meter.  There will be a “pig tail” on the drivers side firewall by the ballast resistor that has a black wire and a tan wire.  The black wire attached to a micro switch on the air meter and a tan wire that attaches to the electric choke cover.  If the ignition harness has these features then is probably safe to assume it is an original fuel injected Corvette.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello, I just bought a carb rebuild kit for my 54 carter yh carb. It has a thicker throttle body gasket than came off the original and also a float needle that does not have the spring in it like the original. Will this kit work with these differences? Thanks.

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

The YH carb can use a thicker gasket as long as all 3 carbs have the same thickness gasket. I do not recall a spring being in the float needle valve, however, if it was there before I would re-use it. Also, if you do not have a fuel pressure regulator I would install one and set at 1 to 2 psi. The pump is 10 psi and will wear needles much faster and 1-2 psi is most adequate.
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Noland Adams, founding President of SACC: 

It’s been a long time since I worked on a YH Carburetor. As I recall, the thicker throttle body gasket will not make a difference. Is the needle valve hollow? To my knowledge it should have a spring in the little cavity. (Which reminds me that I have a dentist’s appointment next Thursday.) Back to the needle valve- it should have a little spring in there.

 

Good Luck, Noland Adams

 

**********

Greetings,

I have several questions reference my 57 and hope that you can assist me.

1.  Were there build sheets for 57's and if there where would they have been?

2.  How do you determine if you have an original fuel car?

3.  How do you detemrine the original color?

Thank you for your assistance, it's appreciated.


Brenda

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  (1)Auto manufacturers did not use build sheets on any cars until 1959.  (3)On the 1957 is is hard to say the original color,  do look for areas that are hard to "repaint" for a best guess. 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi.  Want to remove and replace my windshield frame  so I can install a new windshield seal/gasket?   Looks tough.  Any help/tips re. the  operation?   Thanks.   Jim in Sweet Home, Or.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The Corvette Service Manual ST-10 has a very good section regarding windshield replacement.  You are quite right about it not being an easy job.  You will need a large table to work on it properly.  Be sure to have the weatherstrip ends meet correctly at the inside windshield post bottoms.  Patience required and good luck.     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

 

I realize that I am not a member but I was curious to see if it was possible for you to help me with a quicj question. We recently took on consignment a 1957 Aztec Copper with Beige Coves Fuelie and the color combo is pretty rare according to my research. Being a Fuelie makes it even all the more rare.My question to you: Is there a data plate like the C2's have that indicates the paint scheme and interior scheme? If not s there a way for us to find out if in fact it came from the factory with that coleor combo. Your expertise and time are very much appreictaed and I hoipe to hear from you soon. Thank you.

 

 

 

Michael

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  C-1's don't have "trim tags" as the full bodied GMs and later older model Corvettes. So, no easy method to substantiate colors or FI as original. Having the original window sticker with VIN# and options, would be great, but if you had that you probably wouldn't be asking us.

Frankly, their are some things to look for to determine if it was an original "fuelie" and places to look for original paint. Also, in the trunk compartment, at the factory, a number of these cars had the color name hand printed on the back side of the passenger compartment wall. However, if the restorer did a good job of a full frame off restoration, these signs of any former color are probably gone.

At this point, I would research the car's history and see if whoever performed the restoration, kept any documentation of what they started with.

Good luck!

 

 

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The paint code on the 56/57 Corvettes was originally written on the front frame cross member in plain old chalk.  The first time it got wet it was gone for good.  The 58-60 is in the trunk and the 61-62 is behind the passenger seat, both written in green wax pen. It was not until 63 and type of data plate information was started.

 

 

 

**********

I have a situation that I need assistance with

after cleaning and detailing my female hood latches, I replaced them in my car.  I tested the latching mechanism without the rubber bumpers installed.  All worked very well.  Then I adjusted the bumper stop height on both latches and attempted to open the hood.  My problem is the drivers side latch worked perfectly with the bumper stop installed.  However the passenger side latch will not release the hood allowing the hood to be opened.  In addition the battery was disconnected while working on the car.  So now I can not start the car at all. Your immediate assistance shall be greatly appreciated.  tried having my wife assist by pulling the hood latch release while I pushed down on that side of the hood with out any positive results.

Best regards,

Michael

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  The most likely culprit was the little brass piece that allows a 6/32 clutch head screw to be tightened into the release cable.  The cable has come free from this arrangement and is not allowing the hood release to open.  After the screw is tightened into the brass holder and into the cable the exposed end must be turned up at least 90 degrees so as to eliminate this slippage problem.  Solving this problem is quite difficult but can be done as you are not the first person to experience it.  You will need to securely jack up your car from the ground to obtain working clearance.  You then must remove the passenger side splash pan shield in order to remove the battery.  Removing the battery will be difficult because access is limited from underneath the car and you will have to do much of it with the “brail” method because visibility will be quite limited.  Lower the battery to the ground from the opening where the splash shield was located.  You can now reach up with your hand and it is a stretch and open the latch.  A long screw driver may also be helpful to release the latch.  Good luck!

**********

Hi – just recently joined the SACC and MASACC. Got by first issue of the club magazine, but have not yet received my membership card and number.

 After 40 years I embarked last June in restoration of my 54’. My initial reason for joining club is to get access to all the technical  information that I’m sure exists with those who have previously  accomplished what I’ve just set out on. When my  ’54 is finished, I’m looking forward to joining in full club activities. That won’t stop me from taking part in club activities before then, but my wife’s Z-3 will look a little out of place.

 My car is pretty complete for a ‘54, everything but the ignition shielding and with a whole host of new cosmetic parts my dad bought for me way back when. Right now, I’m looking for support on door hinges. I have mine but they are not tight – my driver side door strikes the body upon closing, so we need those fixed before my restorer can put things back together. He thinks he can have new ones machined, but we were both hoping someone out in the Corvette ‘verse has a better solution or technical hints on how to fix. The usual sites don’t seem to carry NOS or reproductions, but I’m sure I’m not aware of all the specialized solid axle parts dealers.

 Thanks for your help

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC: 

Hi Mike,
   Your membership # is on the Newsletter label, should be 4 digits beginning with a 3. You did not state an address. If you only joined SACC and not a local chapter I do not think we mail out membership cards from SACC. I never received one.
  Re the '54 door hinges. The problem is most likely the hinge pins and they are available from numerous C-1 Corvette parts houses. I checked one source, Grossmueller's in NJ and they have them. Go to  gccorvettes.com and the '53-'55 Catalog. page #6 item B28B four hinge pins for $15.30.
Phone # 800-258-5362.
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman
1954 Corvette (#3329)

 

 

 

 

**********

Please advise the size of the front and back number plate for a 1959 Vette thanks regards, Graeme

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter of SACC Advisor:  Are you referring to American style license plates?  American license plates that were produced from 1956 to current are 6 inches tall by 12 inches wide.

**********

Do you know anyone that makes a gas tank that holds more than 10 or 11 gas and has an internal electric Fuel pump to fit a 1961 corvette that has a LS3 engine. We have put a LS3 engine in our corvette. Havent been able to find a fuel tank with an internal electric fuel pump for this engine except one that is 10 or 11 gallons.  Thanks. A.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Unfortunately you are probably talking to the wrong organization as we are all about restoring and preservation of original solid axle Corvettes.  You really need to seek out and find people who are “Hot Rodders” that are into modifying old Corvettes or any other make for that matter.

*********

Is there a foolproof way to authenticate the factory applied paint color for a 1954 corvette
 
 
Dave

From Dan Dempsey, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  All outside surfaces are high gloss. Everything else is semi gloss.....also, the dash face is high gloss and the top of the dash semi gloss.

Dan

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary: 

Hi Dave,
   I have a '54 and have "been there and done that". When I bought the car in 1996, it was painted white. I was the 4th owner and the third said he bought it hat way, however, he said it was originally a Sportsman Red car, 1 of 100. My research into Noland Adams books showed there were also 300 painted Pennant Blue, about 6-12 painted Black and the rest were Polo White. I removed everything from the body including the original weather striping and sure enough the original paint was red (ish). I took it to the painter and he polished several red spots, clear coated them and computer matched the new paint to the red spots. When complete he did a perfect match to the first coat of paint on the car. It was Venetian Red, one of the most popular car colors on the '56 and '57 Corvette! Further inquiries at the NCM revealed that in mid '54 GM did paint a few cars different colors to experiment with new colors for future production. If the paint job was decent they would put it on a truck.
   The dash, inside the trunk, inside the top storage were all painted the stock red that went with all but the Blue cars.
There is no VIN number codes or nothing on the body to ID the body color. We do keep a '53-'55 VIN Registry, so if you send me your VIN I can see if there is any history in the book.
 
Bruce Fuhrman
Camarillo, CA  

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Dave,

 Sorry, but I don’t understand your question. What do want to authenticate? Are you trying to verify that the shade matches a sample or the paint on another car?

 Many restorers think the Polo White on 1953 to 1955 Corvettes was a refrigerator white, but it was not. Any paint store that has colored strips will have an Antique White sample, which is very close to Corvette’s Polo White. The other colors may to appear as varying shades depending on the lighting, viewing angle, and the viewer’s eyesight. Colors that seem to vary a lot are 1953 to “55 Sportsman Red (interior), 1954 Sportsman Red (exterior), 1955 Gypsy Red (exterior), Pennant Blue, and Shoreline Beige.

 Now, how can we help?

 -Noland Adams

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1.  My 1962 has rubber "donuts" between the front coil springs and the lower a arm.  Can't find them anywhere in the literature and assume they aren't stock.  Is that right?
2.  Same 1962 has a 3:08 non posi differential.  Will a posi unit fit or are the axles different?
Glad I found SACC and have sent in my membership application.  I'm a real good guy, so please vote me in!
Ron

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

Ron,
 
The donuts have been added probably to lift the front end. Your front end may sag if you remove them so you may need to replace the springs. Posi unit will bolt right in with the same axles.

 

 

 

**********

I have a 1962 Corvette (20867S108422) which I have owned since 1969.  When I bought the car from a used car lot, the steering box was broken (probably hit a curb) and the car would only turn right.  I found a replacement steering column in a junkyard and discarded the old broken column.  Unfortunately, I discarded the serial number (VIN) plate with it.  I have done some research and found a source for a new VIN plate - A.G. Backeast in Colorado who says he can provide a new plate for $300 if I can provide a valid title.  In your opinion, is that the right way to resolve my problem?
 
Thank you,

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  Yes, in my opinion, it's probably the best option available, when restoring your VIN tag. I used the same resource to reproduce a TRIM tag for a '57 Nomad, and they did a nice job.

However, the word "unfortunately" is appropriate. Back then, it rarely occurred to many of us to retain the originality of these cars as they were our daily driver. As with health matters, the we are now paying for the sins of our youth. No matter how good the reproduction VIN tag is, if you ever sell the car you should be honest tell them about the reproduction tag. Retain any/all paperwork you have that documents the original VIN number, as this will help.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a non matching# 62 corvette which has a mixed bag engine,,73 350 block, with 3890462 heads. I have owned this car for 20 + yrs. I feel certain it has enough issues that could be competively expensive to rebuild vs. a crate engine. My question is, with the original engine mount system bolted to the heads, which crate engines would have the necessary bolt holes to front mount the engine? My research so far appears to lead me to vortec GM engines which don't share original type intakes,,,,which leads me to question if the seagull exhaust manifolds would bolt up to a vortec head,,,assuming the motor mount would work. I don't want to modify so much of the car to accomodate side mount the motor through a "Ifs" kit. I appreciate any knowledge you could share with me,,,most articles I've seen lean to replacing the chassis or ifs.

From: Doug Prince, Socal Chapter Advisor:  First off your front motor mount bolts between the water pump and the engine block and not via the cylinder heads.  You are correct about the Vortex heads not mating to “original style” intake manifolds, however, stock “Rams Horn” type exhaust manifolds will bolt up.  I don’t know what “issues” your current block  has but if it can be safely bored to .030 over then you would far better to just rebuild it because engine stroke is King for the street as stroke produces more torque and torque is what plants your buttocks into the seat.  It is very common today for engine builders to increase an engines stroke to increase torque output.  Your 462 heads were common back in the 60’s and are a reasonably good choice assuming that they are not “too tired” from numerous valve jobs and cracking between the intake and exhaust valve seats.  If they are not to far “gone” then aftermarket heads are available at reasonable prices.

********

dear sirs , is it ok to use captain lee s spray strip to remove the paint on my 59vet.It has had only one repaint in its whole life and i do not want to hurt it.thanks any info would be greatly appreciated. marc

From: Lary Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi The fiberglass on the early cars was not very good.  Therefore I would not use any chemical striper on these cars.  What happens is the new paint will lift in various places, even if you clean and wash the car several times.  You need to sand ( yes sand the old paint off).  Good luck Larry

 

 

 

 

**********
Dear SACC:

I have a 1958 Corvette.and my rear springs are starting to sag, could you advise me as to where I could send and have them re-arched. I could buy new ones,but the manufacture say they don't appear as original. I have owned this car since 1967 and I feel I owe them this much.

Russ

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor: 

I have used Betts Spring in  Los Angeles (santa Fe Springs) for many years. However, they do not have the correct liners or banding material and tools to do the job to NCRS standards. I have them re arc the springs to 1/2" over spec (id rather be higher than lower) and shot peened so they will hold their shape. They ship them back to me unassembled. I clean, paint, reassemble and band them myself with a liner and band kit from Paragon or Corvette Central.
 
If you aren't concerned about proper liners etc Betts can do the entire job for you. You can find their # on their web site.

 

 

 

Russ,
 
My springs are off my 57 and are about to go to Eaton Detroit Spring in, of all places, Detroit, MI to be rearched.  Eaton comes highly recommended by a friend (and SACC member) in the area so I'm looking forward to no tire/body rubbing!
 
Bill Herron
#229

 

**********

My brother and I recently purchased a 1950 Chevy 5-window truck.  A small block Chevy engine had been installed and the casting number would indicate that it was out of a 1957 Corvette.  The fellow that sold us the truck told us that the engine was removed from his friends 1957 Corvette 25 years ago.  The casting number on the engine is 3731548.  The   stamped number on the front of the block is F50IF.  We cannot seem to find any of the explanations for stamped engine numbers that make sense for this one.  Can you shed some light on this number?  Thanks, Grant.

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  The casting number is correct for a 1957 Corvette engine block.  The only engine code for 1957 Corvette that ends in an F would EF which designates a 283 cubic inch, Corvette motor, base horsepower 220 with three manual transmission.  You might be misreading the engine code stamping thinking that the E is an I.  Mike McCloskey what do you think?

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  F501F translates to  (F) Flint, (5) May,  (01)  1st, ( F )  passenger car, powerglide.The 3731548 blocks were used only in 1957 and all blocks were the same with the stamping indicating the application and horse power.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
I would like to add radial tires 205 75 15 to my new, to me, 62 and would like to keep my current bias tires on the existing rims.  What 15 by 6 GM wheel would have the right offset and the ability to hold my stock wheel covers?

Thanks, Lawrence

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter advisor: Any GM 15 x 5 wheel will work just fine as this tire and wheel combination is tried and true.  The 15 x 6 wheel will also work but is not really necessary.

From Bill Herron, past Treasurer of SACC:  While most GM 4.75" bolt pattern wheels will work, only Corvette wheels have the "bumps" that hold the stock wheel covers on.  You could weld bumps on a newer rim but be careful or you'll watch a cap roll by after you stop somewhere!

 

 


 

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi :  In Volume 14 number l ( Spring 2007) page 27 I wrote an article regarding a 6 inch wheel on our early cars.  Follow that article and you will be surprised at the improved handling.  The engineering for a 205-75R 15 was for a 6 inch rim not a 5 inch.  Any questions please contact me.  Thanks Larry

 

 

 

 

**********
Corvette front bumpers.  58 to 62, many people say they are different. '58 to '60 different from '61 to '62. Does any one have answer?...............Dan

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter advisor:  I believe that the 58-62 bumpers were all the same, however, the grills for 58-60 are completely different than 61-62.  In addition the front license plate bumper brackets for 61-62 are a quite bit shorter than 58-60.  Grill bars for 61-62 have a V notch that goes to the bottom and 62 grills were spaced back further than in 1961 as is born out in the 1962 AIM.

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  My 1964 Chevrolet Master Parts book lists 58-60 front bumpers 3739385 (left) and 3739386(right). 61-62 bumpers are 3782291(left) and 3782292(right)  so clearly there is a difference between the two. Since all 58-62's use the same bumper brackets I must assume the difference is in the grill bar mounting area since 58-60 and 61-62 use different grills and grill bars. I would need to inspect them side by side to determine the difference.
 
Chip

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello. Please help me. I have the door window glass hitting the bottom of the hardtop in the rear of the glass.   The front of the door glass has   a 3/8 gap between the window and the gasket  the window stops are even  removed completely to accomplish this any ideas would be appreciated.  Thanks,    Mel

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Let me understand that you have the front and rear window stops removed and you still have this kind of fitting problem……Houston we have a problem!  Is the hardtop original in all respects?  Any known body damage or wrecks that you know of?  Can you obtain or borrow another hardtop to put on your car to verify this problem?  Your problem is highly unusual and will have to be further investigated if a “loaner” top fits just as bad.

**********

On my 62, Honduras Maroon, the wheels are painted black yet I have seen other cars, such as Reggie Jackson's 62 with the wheels painted Maroon, what is correct as I am going to buy new tires, and thought it was an opportunity to correct this mistake, if it is one.

 
Phil

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

1962 wheels were painted black if the car was equipt with white wall tires and body color with black wall tires.
 
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Dear SACC:

 How often do you see these kind of cars (1958) with, for example, bottom rear corner of door sticking out 1/8 – 1/4 inch beyond the body line?  And exactly how do the body shop fix this kind of problem where the panels have poor fit? 

I’ve been told they just build up material on the body to make the body fit to the door, trunk lid or hood that sticking up or out.

Aloha,

Eric

From: Doug Prince, Socal SACC Advisor:  St. Louis used shims at the hinges of the deck lid and trunk lid to obtain a better fit but if you want it to be perfect you would have to a competent body shop “glass up” the components for a perfect fit.  The doors can also be adjusted to correct some of the poor fit that you describing.

From: Dan Dempsey, SACC Advisor:  This is correct, however, use fiberglass for the fitting not bondo........Dan

 

**********

Dear Solid Axle Club,
I have a 6 vette and have owned it for 10 years. When ever I make a right hand trun, I smell gas.
It seems gas is coming up the filler tube and leaking past the cap. I checked the tank, and I see spot welds that tells me this tank has a baffle. If I keep the gas level below 1/4 tank, then I don't have a problem with gas leaking past the cap.
I tried changing caps and installing new gaskets inside the cap, but the seal is not adequate.
Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Jim

From: Doug Prince, SoCal advisor:  The rubber hose that connects the filler neck to the gas tank is probably cracked and bad.  You will have to remove the gas tank cover in order to replace it with a new one that is readily available from all the major Corvette parts suppliers.

**********

I am in the process of restoring a 1958 corvette.  How do you remove the steering column mast from the gear box?  Don’t want to take a chance of damaging it but cannot find an answer in the GM manuals I have.

Thanks,

Larry

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor: 

Larry,
 
There is no need to remove the mast jacket from the steering box........in fact an attempt to do so would probably do more damage than good. I suspect the two pieces are press fit. Once the steering columm assembly is removed from the car and cleaned,reassemble with the new parts. The worm gear and shaft assembly  go in from the bottom. Be sure to install a new upper steering column bearing during the rebuild and use sealer on the gaskets and threads. I use 680 weight gear oil rather than factory recomended 90 wt. Note that the upper steering box bearing race requires a special tool for removal so I reuse the original race.
 
58 columns were painted interior color except very late cars which were semi gloss black with only the top 6" or so painted interior color. The box is semi gloss black.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

**********

Was Chevy orange the standard factory engine block color for 1962?

From: Brad Bean, SACC VP:  Yes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi guys,
 
I have a couple of questions. I have a 1961 and the stamp on the block is T05I8EB, casting # is 3756519. Can you please tell me what this engine is out of? Also, I'm restoring my cooling system this winter (new radiator, hoses, water pump, etc.). There are three bolts (with nuts) on each side of the fan schroud that attach it to the radiator support. It's difficult to get to the nuts to hold them. Are there supposed to be nuts welded to the radiator support for these bolts? I've owned this car since 1972 so I believe the radiator support is original. I've checked in the GM parts book, AIM, and the various suppliers of repo schrouds and bolt sets for them and none seem to show nuts for the bolts. When I removed the shroud it only had bolts in the two upper holes on the shroud on each side. It does'nt appear there were ever any bolts in the lower holes. Should there be three or two on each side.
 
Thank you for your time, Mike

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  This engine block was used in 1958-1961 passenger cars with Turboglide transmission and four barrel carburetor.  This particular block was built in Tonawanda, New York, May 18.

 1961 Corvette fan shrouds were attached to the core support with three bolts on each side.  The top bolt holes on each side were not used.  The core support had “weld nuts” that the bolts attached to.  The bolts were recessed hex head with an E mark with serrations and were black phosphate.

 

**********
What is the cam duration on a 1958 corvette 23o HP

From Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  1958-1961 Corvette Base Motor 230 Horsepower engines used a hydraulic camshaft with 250 degrees of duration.

**********

Mr Prince I have a buddy that has a 1958 fuel injection unit. He is building a 1965 coupe and would like to know if there is any CFM data available on 7014900 or 7014900R units or where we may find this information. Any info on this subject would be greatly appreciated Thanks
 
Van

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  The 4900 and the 4900R both flowed approximately 525 CFM.  The 4900R was calibrated about 2% richer than the 4900.  The 63-65 fuel injection units flowed approximately 575 CFM and were all calibrated richer than the 4900’s.  All Rochester Fuel Injection units had three inch throttle plates and the 63-65’s had larger plenums and plenum runners therefore they flowed a little more air.

**********
Hello there,

My dear husband who would kill me if he saw that I was typing this, misplaced the only set of keys we have to our 1961 Corvette.  I have a sneaking suspicion they are in the trunk, but he seems to think they are in the pocket to a USMC uniform that he turned back into the Corps when he retired last year.

Anyway - no locksmith wants to touch the car, so I thought I'd seek expert advice about how I go about fixing this dilemma.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Michelle

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The good news is, you can open the trunk without a locksmith.  The bad news is, you will have to damage the trunk emblem in order to do it.  Drill a series of holes in the plastic emblem to weaken it and break it out as well as the metal dish behind the emblem.  Now use this hole to reach the rod on the key tumbler inside the trunk lid. Now pull the rod until the latch releases.  Good luck and all is not lost

 

 

.

From: Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

One way would be to remove the glove box key assembly and take to a locksmith. He can make a key which if a stock car should match the trunk lock.
Phil, an owner of a '62.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Bill Herron, past Treasurer of SACC;  

"One key fits all" on my 57.  If your glove box is unlocked, open it and remove the lock.  The actual lock unit (inside the housing) will have a four digit number stamped on it; that's the key code for that lock.  I don't recall 61 for sure but assuming it's the same as 57 that code (and a competent locksmith) will be able to make a new key.  As an alternative, call AAA (I did once when I locked the keys in my trunk 3500 mi from home!).  I won't bother with the details but a locksmith came out and opened the trunk with no damage.
 
Bill Herron

 

**********

Im looking for a place to purchase a service manual that has the information on how to change and set up a new crown and pinion gear set.
Hope you can help.
Thanks

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Refer to Corvette Service Manual ST-12 Chapter 4.

**********
Hi,
Could you please supply me with the wheel alignment specs for my '61 Vette?
It's steering very average and I've got her booked in at the local tyre shop for adjustment but they haven't any spec's.

Thanks in advance,
Alex

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  

As per Corvette Service Manual ST-12 wheel alignment is as follows:

Caster    2 degrees  +- ½ degree

Camber   ½ degree +- ½ degree

King Pin Inclination   3 1/2 to 4 1/2 degrees

Toe-In (per wheel)    1/16th inch – 1/8thinch

Toe-Out on Turns

   Inner Wheel     20 degrees +- 2degrees

Outer Wheel 24 degrees +- 2dgrees

**********
I've got another question.

I need a service manual / rebuild manual with pictures of the original
3-Speed Saginaw transmission which is used in my 1960 Corvette.

It seems that there is no information or manual about this 3-Speed
transmission. That is very disappointing. Furthermore there are no rebuild
kits for this kind of transmission available?

Do you know where I can gather information about this transmission or even a
book? And where to buy any correct rebuild kit?

Thank you very much and have a nice day.


Yours sincerely


Ruedi Keller, Switzerland

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Information about rebuilding and repairing three speed manual transmissions can be found in a 1961 Chevrolet Passenger Car Shop Manual.  The chapter in this manual would also apply to your 1960 three speed transmission.

**********

I have a 1962 corvette and would like some help the number on the steering colm is #20867S103393 I would like to know the build date of the corvette and what would be the correct date code for the block and heads 327 340 hp with 4 speed any help would be great
Thanks Walt

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  Your '62 was built fairly early on the 15th of November1962.  Actually your '62 is fairly early production model year.  The '62 started production on September 17, 1962.

 

 

 

 

**********

What type of gas should I use in my 1959 vette it's a 283 automatic just restored,thank you Phil

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Your engine has lower compression than the high performance engines and should operate just fine on 91 Octane gasoline.  Today’s gasoline’s are 10% gasohol which is very detrimental to older cars fuel systems.  Gasohol attracts water which when combined with alcohol forms an acid compound which will start to eat away at the inside of older pot metal carburetors and metal fuel lines.  By adding one once of automatic transmission fluid to each gallon of gasoline will inhibit this process so that rust and acids can not form in your Corvette’s fuel system.

**********

Hi,
I just ran across your web site and I'm not an SACC member.  I have a 1960 Corvette and the generator has started to smoke so I'm guessing that it needs to be rebuilt. Do you have any recommendations for a shop that can either rebuild my current generator or a source where I can purchase a "new" generator?  I live in Minnesota but obviously I'd be willing to send the generator off to a shop that knows what they are doing.
Thanks.
Doug

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Doug,

When replacing parts on your 1960 Corvette, be aware that original parts are more valuable than common replacement parts. Even if your Corvette is modified, keep any original parts you have.

Normally generators are rebuildable if the case isn’t damaged. Every Corvette parts dealer will have a shop in their area that rebuilds generators, starters, distributors, master brake cylinders, Etc. If your part is original, be sure that you get your original rebuilt and returned. I don’t know where you live, but I’d contact the closest Corvette vendor first.

 If you can’t find a vendor, call Corvette Stop at 530) 677-4270. I have worked in Drew’s business for several years, and he knows about the needs of Corvette owners. Corvette Stop is in El Dorado County, California, just East of Sacramento. That’s why I suggested that you try a local source first.

 Enjoy your “60,

 Noland Adams

From Doug Prince, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  First off there are many qualified generator rebuilding shops scattered across the country but you must first determine that you have the correct generator that is original/correct for your Corvette to go through the motions of having it rebuilt.  If the generator in question is not original then you could obtain a generic replacement or seek out a rebuilt original that is correct for your Corvette.  If your generator still has the original Delco Remy metal tag affixed to the body it will either read 1102043 for all engines except for high performance fuel injection or 1102173 for high performance fuel injection engines.  If you have neither of these generators on your Corvette you could opt out for either a generic “over the counter” replacement or seek out a rebuilt correct generator for your Corvette.  NCRS Driveline or Ebay would be your best bet for correctness.

**********
How do I know when my car was built?? 104585           model year 1958.

From; Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Your 1958 Corvette was built early on February 25, 1958.

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello,
 I recently bought a neglected 61, and am concerned that it has the wrong driveshaft.  My question is this: what is the correct overall length of the driveshaft?   
 
I replaced two very badly arched rear springs with replacements from Paragon and now see that the yoke doesn't penetrate the transmission tailshaft up to the previously worn (bright), area?
Also, the driveshaft looks to be an aftermarket shaft.
 Thank You,
 Ger

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  Drive shaft measures 34 1/2" from center of front u joint to center of rear u joint. Yoke is 4 3/4 ".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
I've got another question about my 1960 Corvette.

I just cannot figure out how to install the door end tab which should be
bent and also holds the weatherstrip (see enclosed pictures).

Do you have a close-up picture of such a tab correctly installed? It seems
that it would otherwise make scratches at the door.

Thank you very much for an answer and have a nice day.

Yours sincerely

Ruedi

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Look in the 1960 assembly manual, section F, sheet 11. Once you install the retainer, you bend the vertical end up under the weatherstrip. And yes, sometimes it will scratch the door jam.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********
Can you tell me the proper diameter of the front coil springs for my 59 vette, what they put in the car measures 0.6685 and the suspension has absolutely no give whatsoever, any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks in advance for your time, Pat

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  Original 53-62 standard Corvette spring coils measure .550 and the free ( unsprung) hight of the spring is 13 3/4". 57-59 heavy duty springs have a free hight of 11 1/8" . I do not know the coil diameter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********
Can you tell the build date of my '62 FI by the VIN number?  The VIN ends with S107588.

Thanks
Steve

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  Your car was built the first week of March probably on Thursday March the 1st of 1962.

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The first Corvette on March 1st was #7655 and the first Corvette built on March 2nd was #7724, so most likely March 1st 1962.

 

 

 

**********

Hi Guys!

 Thank for your help the last time.

 I have a ’58 car with oversized screw holes for door panels.  Problem is the oversize screws are loose.

 Question:  how can this be fixed?  I understand to fix fiberglass, both sides has to be sanded and roughed up to adhere new fiberglass layup to prepare for new holes, but I don’t think the inside of the inner door can be reached.

 Aloha,

Eric

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  Enlarge the holes in the door, insert plastic anchors (some are square & some are round) into the door.  Now' you can use the normal screw to hold your door panel on.

 

 

 

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  You don’t necessarily have to fiberglass repair both sides of the hole in the door panel as fiberglass repairing of the outside of the door panel hole is sufficient.  However it is like putting a band aid on the problem as it is usually just a one time repair that will strip out over time.  NCRS member Joe Calgagno used to market a metal repair kit that was a fantastic solution to the problem but I don’t think they are available anymore.  To make up this kit on your own is a real no brainer.  Obtain some real thin sheet metal from Lowes or Home Depot about 1/16th thick and cut it into pieces approximately ½ inch by 5/8ths inch and then drill two small holes for small rivets that will attach the metal pieces over the bad door panel holes.  You could skip this rivet step and fiberglass the metal pieces to the door panel.  With this repair you are now putting the door panel screws into metal and not a weak fiberglass repair.  I do this all the time and it works just great.

**********

I have a 54 Corvette vin number E54S003218, car has a top flight award but, major deduction was for engine block stamping. (Stamping improper, insistent?)
casting number, 911
casting date, C114 march 11, 1954
engine stamping, 04I95I7 F54YG My guestion is what date should the stamping be.
Per Corvette Birthday Book, Production date is 5-27-54.
Any help is appreciated.
Rick

From Bruce Fuhrman, SACC Secretary:  

Hi Rick'
     I have a '54 S/N 3329 which came with engine S/N 0727180. Mine was built in June '54. So, your dates look correct, however, the engine S/N would have been assembled approximately in March '54 based S/N's listed in Noland Adam's book and should have an engine S/N around 070XXXX, not 0419517. There are some production sequence abnormalities which can be explained since some cars have been found to have the original engines built 1-3 months before the car build date. All engines were run up on a test stand before installation. If there were any leaks, noises or other abnormalities, they were sent back to assembly for correction and when repaired, put back in the cycle. Obviously, this could take time. My current engine S/N is 0434847 which was assembled in about April of '54.
Hope this helps,
Bruce Fuhrman 

**********

 

 

Hello,
As I continue my search I realize there is huge amounts of wrong info being
posted on the web.............damn.
Stamped to the engine block-passengers side front on block F1018EB-I have found out(I think) what most of this means-F=Flint-though another web site said that Flint V-8's were designated with a V. 10-Oct.? 18-18th day?-EB-E=Corvette?  but what is the B for? I am so confused;and tired of asking.
Appreciate any help that you can offer.
                                            Thank You,
                                              Dan

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Advisor:  (You need to) Buy the NCRS judging manual!

From: Doug Prince, Socal Advisor:  Your engine was built in Flint, MI. October 18th and the engine is for a 283 c.i. passenger car with dual four barrel carbs and solid lifter cam that was 270 horsepower.  1958 Corvette engine codes for fuel injection was as follows:  CR 250 horsepower hydraulic cam with manual transmission, DH 250 horsepower hydraulic cam with Powerglide transmission and CS 290 horsepower solid lifter cam with manual transmission.  Sorry to tell you that you have the wrong engine block!

Dan,
 
It is not possible to determine what your motor (block) came out of without knowing the casting # and casting date of the block. Your decoding of the F1018 is correct.  However, EB is a suffex code that was used for several years and indicates the following applications.
 
1957                     283     passenger car  270hp
 
1958 thru 1961    283     passenger car   turboglide with 4 barrel carb
 
 
The only thing I can say with certainty  is that your block is not original to your car.
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Hello, 
 
I was changing my axle bearings and pulled the ham out (not a limited-slip), to flush out the rear housing when I found one of the side carrier gears with chip damage to the outer end surfaces of the teeth.  
Upon close inspection, it seems that none of the other gears have evidence of related damage and so wondered if this gear may have been used by some unscrupulous previous owner to patch up the differential for resale??
 
Anyway, I wouldn't mind finding a compatible 3.70 differential assembly to prepare as necessary for my car and wondered what other Chevs used this same unit.
 
Any help will be greatly appreciated.
 
Thanks,
Ger

From:  Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

These rear ends were used in 56-62 Corvettes, 55-64 Chevrolet, 62-64 or65 Chevy Nova.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I'M FINISHING RESTORATION ON A 1960 AND NOTICED THAT ABOUT 18" FROM THE BACK OF THE FRONT FENDERS A HUMP ON TOP OF BOTH FRONT FENDERS OF THE CAR.
I TRIED ADJUSTING THE BODY SHIMS BUT THAT MADE NO DIFFERENCE,DO YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS THAT MIGHT HELP ME CORRECT THIS PROBLEM? I HAVE CHECKED WITH OTHER OWNERS IN THE AREA AND THAT PROBLEM IS NOT VISIBLE ON THEIRS. THANKS---RON

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Chapter advisor:  Shim the front bumper brackets so you are not pulling rearward on the body when you tighten the bumper bolts. 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Ron,
 
I suspect the reason you have not received a response to your question is that it is impossible to identify the problem without seeing the car. My guess is one of the following:
 
1.  18" from the rear of the front fender is the point where the inner fender is bonded to the outer fender. The bonding material can cause a line across the fender at the bonding point, but not a "hump". I see this problem on 56-57 cars , but  not later ones.
 
2.   A front end may have been spliced onto the car at this point and poor body work may have resulted in the hump.
 
I doubt shimming will solve your problem. I would carefully inspect the front end fiberglass for prior repair work to help identify the cause of the problem. The easiest solution most likely will be sanding/grinding the area smooth and repainting the front end.
 
Again, I am only guessing. A competent Corvette body shop can provide a more definitive answer.
 
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Hi

I am having trouble with my brake lights working intermittently.  I know the problem is in the steering column where the turn signals and horn all come together.  However, I can't get it adjusted where the brake lights work and the horn doesn't sound when I turn the wheel.  Do you have a solution to this problem?  I'd welcome ideas for how to fix this problem permanently.  I've had this worked on multiple times.  It works for a while and then the problem returns.  Thus, I'm always worrying that the brake light aren't working.

Thanks for your help.

Jo

From: Doug Prince, SoCal Advisor:  If you are using the original cancelling cam mechanism it is probably completely worn out.  Buy a current reproduction but KEEP the original cancelling cam spring as the spring that comes with the repro is Chinese and is not nearly as strong as the original and will not cancel the turn signal after the turn has been performed.  Be sure that you are using a new reproduction turn signal switch and make sure that all the connections are nice and tight at the steering column.  Be sure to clean and lubricate the cancelling cam wheels that are in the turn signal housing.

**********

Hello,

 1962 Corvette Headlight Switch.  How do you get the knob out of the switch? 

 I have a new switch and the nut wrench to get it out of the dash.

 Thanks,

 John

From: Max Brockshouse, SACC President:  Reach up under the dash, feel the light switch. on the top will be a small button with a spring holding it out, press the button down while pulling out on the knob, this will release the knob/rod assembly.  The knob rod will be three sided with a grove on the end/tip.  Use a LARGE screwdriver to remove the bezel on the out side of the dash, this will allow you to remove the light switch assembly.  To replace the knob into the switch, hold the button while inserting the knob, otherwise the rod will not seat in the switch assembly.

**********

Hi,
  I am restoring my 1960 Corvette rims. Is the entire wheel painted the same as the body color?
Frank

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Frank,
 
1960 Corvette wheels were dipped in semi gloss black paint. Then the front of the wheel was painted body color. Body color overspray can (and should be) seen on the backsides of the wheel.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********
I am restoring my 59 (owned since 1970, off the road for last 25 years, 77k miles) and have done a lot of reading/research (including much of Noland Adams guide and the Baird/Howey handbook). Today's questions (among the many) are about the suspension. First, the consensus appears to be to replace the coil springs BUT other than NOS (haven't looked for them yet) do all the replacement springs cause the front end to sit too high? Second question is, is there a way to evaluate the original springs or do I assume (as appears to be the case) that ALL 50 year old springs are now sagged somewhat and should just be replaced. Final question, is there one supplier that is most recommended for these front end parts, hopefully made in the USA?? Thanks, Barry

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Advisor:  Most original springs have some sag.  Check the assembly manual for front end curb height to determine how much sag your springs have.  All new springs, in my experience, are too tall.  There are many original used springs out there for your car from guys like David Sokolowski, 310-329-5334. Hope that helps.  Mike

**********

I have a 1962 Corvette 340 HP with a 4 speed tranny, I need to change the tranny oil and I have a couple of questions.
 
I noticed 2 plugs on the right side of tranny one low and one slightly higher, I'm assuming the lower is drain plug and the higher is the fill plug, is this correct?
 
Should I use Valvoline Synchromesh fluid or stick to 90w oil, I have read the specs and noticed that the 4 speed tranny has sync on all 4 gears, I'm assuming that they are brass due to the age of the car, what is the recommended fluid?
 
Any help would be appreciated.
 
Thanks
 
Robert

From: Mike McCloskey, SoCal Advisor:  You have the plug arrangement correct.  Fill until it runs our of upper plug...about 2 1/4 pints.  Unless your trans is shimmed tight and is difficult to shift into 2nd when cold I'd use the 90 weight (or 85-140).  If its a tight trans, use the GM manual trans fluid (more like 30w).  Mike

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

yes, the lower plug is the drain plug. I have always used 90 wt gear oil and never had any problems. However, I do live in S. Calif. and never have to deal with cold weather which may make a difference.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********
I have a block with casting num. 3756519 and engine code num. FOI28M could you tell what its out of? thanks, frank

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:

3756519 is a 283 block from 1958-1962.  Suffex "M" indicates 1958-1962 trademaster truck with manual trans. "F" indicates the block was cast in Flint, Mi. and 0128 is the build date........Jan.28. Can not identify the year without the block casting date.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Do you have any parts blowups or rebuild information for a washer pump assembly for a 1961 corvette

 Thanks for your help

 Ray

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

To the best of my knowledge, the only person who has parts and rebuilds C-1 washer pumps is Tom Maxwell     301-948-9481    tmax61@msn.com.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi Folks,
I have a 59 corvette which has a sealed air cleaner.  How does one go about properly cleaning it?

From: Brad Bean, Vice President of SACC:  Not sure about others, but I have an early '60 which has the same sealed air cleaner. Once every few years, I soak mine for a few hours, in kerosene and then rinse and flush it with clean water. Seems to work for me.

Brad

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 A friend has a 1958 corvette that has been painted more than once. He wanted to know what the factory colors might have been. I found a website " corvette history 1958" in their article they said the 58s had a code plate on the engine side of the cowl. This had body identification, production build date and paint and trim codes. Now this has lead to some disagreement as to if it is there or not. Evidently it is not on his 58. Could you tell us if it is true?

 

thanks Jim

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Jim,

 The trim plate exists, but the first year for the factory installed trim plate was 1963, when it was located under the glove box door next to the serial number plate.

 There might be a hidden body color name in the trunk area. Remove the large cardboard panel in the front of the trunk area. Near or under the right trunk hinge the body color was written using a large lumber crayon (usually green). The name was covered by overspray when the trunk was painted. Using a quarter, scratch away the paint to reveal the color name. Ivory means white, but red, blk, blue, or char (charcoal) are obvious.

 Good Luck,

 Noland Adams

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  While the passenger cars & trucks did have the data plate you refer to, production Corvettes did not have any info attached anywhere except the Serial Number plate until 1963.  The only ways I know to determine the original color are to: 1) find an inconspicuous area and carefully remove the layers of paint until you get to the last one; and/or 2) take a quarter and lightly scrape the paint off of the trunk side of vertical divider panel between the trunk and decklid compartment.  Many, if not most of the 58-62s had the body paint color written in grease pencil there.  Note that (I believe on the later Solid Axles) the color might have been scribbled on the vertical panel in the passenger compartment behind one of the seat backs.  Since the color was written in grease pencil the paint would not adhere; hence a careful scraping usually reveals the color.
 
Bill Herron

**********

My generator on my 1960 restored Vette has no numbers, obviously a replacement. Is there a way to get it stamped??
 
Thanks,
 
Charlie
 
From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  
Corvette generators have a aluminum tag which is stamped with the part # and assembly date and rivited to the generator. Any of the Corvette parts suppliers should be able to provide you with a tag. You will need to give them the horse power and serial # or assembly date of your car for the tag to be made correctly. Note that the old rivits have usually been broken off by a rebuilder and you may want to have another rebuilder install the new tag to avoid damaging the generator.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

**********

How do I tell original paint colors on my 62'.
Thanks in advance.
 
Joe

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Long story short; take the passenger seat out, then scratch gently until you find green wax marks under the paint.  It will have your paint color the Corvette left the St. Louis plant spelled out.  Also, look in hard to reach areas inside your Corvette for spots that have never been repainted over the years.

 

 

 

**********

Hello,

 I have a 62 that will not start. When I try to start the car there is nothing, no clicking sound, nothing. I have replaced the battery, starter, starter solenoid, ignition switch. The wiring harness is about 5 years old. I am stumped. What can I do next? Is there something I am missing? I sthere some test I can do?

 Thanks,

 Ron

 

From: Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:    

I guess the first thing I'd ask is does anything else work?  (ie headlamps).  If nothing works I'd start with the battery cables and trace them back (neg for proper ground & pos for proper attachment) and work my way further as necessary.  If you have working lights I'd be looking at the starting wiring circuit even though you've replaced some things - reproductions sometimes are not as well manufactured as the General's originals.
 
Bill Herron

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  Assuming the starter, solenoid, battery, ign switch and STARTER HARNESS are all good, I would do the following......simple stuff 1st. If the simple things don't fix the problem I would assume that one of the other components in the starting circuit is defective.
 
* is there a battery shut off? They can be defective or wear out and when they do you will get nothing.....no clicking or anything. Remove it and connect your negitive cable directly to the battery.
 
*Check the negitive battery cable ground .......it should be connected to a starter bolt @ the bell housing and should be clean and tight.
 
* Check the starter harness @ the ignition switch to confirm it is pluged in correctly..........it is possible to plug it in so that one of the 3 prongs is not engaged.
 
* Check for power at the solenoid......if no power you have a bad battery or cables.... and starter switch....no power would indicate problem with starter harness.
 
* if you have a remote starter switch, you can bypass the ign switch and harness......if it turns over the problem would be in the switch or harness.
 
*We have a member here in S. Calif. who had the same problem..........turned our to be a bad battery. Check the battery with a voltmeter........it should read about 14 volts
 
Any competent repair shop could most likely resolve this problem quickly. The C-1 starting circuit is quite simple and the shop would have the right tools to analize the problem. I would be interested to hear how your problem is resolved.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********
I have completely restored my 1958 corvette with a 285 fuel injection system.  The engine was purchased and rebuilt in Tilton, NH and the fuel injection was purchased from Jack Podell.  We first had a problem with the exhaust overheating and Jack suggested that we advance the timing.  We did and it fixed the exhaust overheating problem.  Now the engine starts fine and runs well until it gets hot.  Once the engine gets hot, it runs rough.

I don't know what to do.  My life savings are in the car.

Regards,
Jerry

From:  Doug Prince, Fuel Injection Tech Advisor, SoCal Chapter of SACC:  My name is Doug Prince and I am the fuel injection technical advisor for the Southern California Chapter of SACC.  I have well over 30 years experience rebuilding and restoring Rochester Fuel Injection Units so I think I know a little bit about them.  Jerry Arcaro references a fuel injection unit that I do not recognize as his 1958 Corvette should have either a 7014900 or 7014900R fuel injection unit depending on whether it is a hydraulic cam 250 horsepower car or a solid lifter 290 horsepower car.  That said retarded ignition timing will cause the engine to run poorly and cause the exhaust manifolds to run extremely hot.  I have seen them turn red from heat and apparently Jack Podell was able to steer him in the right direction by advancing the ignition timing.  Starting up cold and running good and then running rough after warm up could be a function of a number of problems.  If the automatic choke and fast idle assembly is not working properly the fuel injection will continue to run in the cold start mode and the fuel meter will continue to be in full rich position and the ratio lever will be on the power stop.  One must observe that the ratio lever leaves the power stop position and then swings over to the economy stop position. Running rough after warm up could also be that the economy stop is too rich.  Another cause could be that the idle mixture screw is out of adjustment and is too rich.  Turning it clock wise will lean out the idle mixture.  The Chevrolet ST12 Service Manual has an excellent section pertaining to fuel injection and trouble shooting.  Jerry may have to rely on some outside expertise.

**********

Hello,
Although I am not a member yet...but will be shortly, I wonder if you could answer this question?
 
I recently completed a frame off restoration on my very low mileage, garage kept, 59 Vette. All work was done by me. While putting the original rear bumpers back on the car, I noticed there was a date stamp on the inside of each bumper in black ink. 
The stamp reads APR 22 AM. It would have appeared to me that this would have washed off over the years but it hasn't. It is a low mileage car and I am the 3rd owner and it's always been garage kept. I have all documentation and receipts (including copy of the original title and the original Bill of Sale) back to the original owner and am confident these are absolutely the original GM issued (not re-chromed) bumpers that came on the car and the car has never been in an accident. In all the restoration books that I have ever read, I have never seen mention of these date stamps. (Could this be a new discovery?) The APR 22 is obviously the date but I don't know what the AM stands for unless is was the morning shift...I don't know. Has anyone seen these date stamps before and can you shed any light on them? I have pictures attached. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 
P.S. I posted this question on the NCRS website but had little or no response. Have you ever heard of these date stamps? I wrote to Bob Beard who wrote the 1958 to 1960 Corvette restoration & judging book and he had never heard of these date stamps. He asked that I send him pictures to be included in his next book, which I did. Any info will be very much appreciated.
 
Thank you. 

 
Wayne

 

**********

I have a 1954 corvette and am getting it ready for NCRS judging September 16 and 17. My wiper arms may not b correct. They have TRICO with the letters smaller on each side and numbers as follows 2668725-2691186 CAL 1942-48-52BR. 546431 ad other patent pending numbers.

Thanks for your help,

Tommy

From: Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:  The date stamps on your pics look quite a bit like the ones I've seen on the instruments in my 56, 57 and 58 over the years.  I feel that those date stamps are correct and original, given your car's history.  It doesn't surprise me at all that for the most part they have not survived the passage of time.  What's the serial number of your car?  I'll bet that the assembly date was May, 1960 or later.

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Chevrolet dated many parts for traceability purposes. I have seen date stamps on trunk and deck lids ( under the hinge), door posts, speedometers, clocks, door panels, frames and wiper motors,  but never on bumpers. Living in S. California I have had the opportunity to see/inspect many original, non rusty cars over the years and have attempted to take note of unusual markings etc. Sorry I can't confirm that the dates were put on by the factory or vender, but it certainly could be the case. You didn't indicate the Vin # or build date of your car...........it must have a build date after April 22 ( May, June, July) if the stamp is original.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC:  

Hi Tommy,
    I have a '54 with what I believe are the original wiper arms. I looked at the drivers side info. It has the following:
"TRICO"- "SOME OF PATENTS. 202 0244 214 2146396.......... ends with 2564819. CAN. 1936-38-42-43-45-49. BR. 470652.......PATS PEND. MADE IN USA" All this info, except the TRICO requires a magnifying glass to read. I believe the NCRS judges may only verify the TRICO and a series on very small #'s??? 
Good luck,
Bruce Fuhrman

 

 

 

 

**********

Hello, I was wondering if anyone could tell me what width Crager rims and size BFG radial T/A tires will fit my 61? I want to keep a 15" diameter.
Many thanks.

From: Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:  

I have 6" rims (not Cragar but Kelsey-Hayes/Buick Skylark wires) and 215-65R15 radials with no rubbing problems to speak of (assuming "normal" driving, but don't ask Doc H about that...) on my 57.  I believe your 61 has better rear wheel well/body clearance so you might be able to fit an even wider rim - BUT - I would be concerned with 1) front wheel clearance with anything wider and 2) proper rear springs so there's no body interference.
 
Bill Herron
#229

 

 

**********

I would like to know if it is possible that a July dated starter #1107233 2 g 23 be use on
a early 1963 corvette? help will be greatly appreciated. thanks

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

According to NCRS, all 1963 Corvettes used srarter # 1107243. 63's used a different bell housing (than 62's) which did  not have holes for starter bolts. All 63 starters bolted up into the block. I believe it is possible to change the gear end of the 62 starter so it would work with a 63 bell housing.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Can you provide a source for a quartz movement for my 60 Vette clock?
Also, instuctions on the job wouild be appreciated.
 
Thanks.
 
Dennis

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

I have used VALLEY VETTES ( Mike Poirier) in San Diego for many years. He is a very nice guy and his work is outstanding.......and a quartz conversion is very reasonable. 619-461-1952
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Since I’ve had the car, my ’60 trunk lid has always been sitting about ½” high at the driver’s side front edge. I thought at first it was just the way things are with the fiberglass body, but it’s starting to bother me now. Looks like someone may have overloaded the trunk at some time and forced the lid down, bending the horseshoe shaped hinge bracket. Is that possible?

The deck lid and passenger side trunk lid fit as well as can be expected, weatherstrip is not the issue. I can’t find any method of adjustment other than shims at the bottom of the hinge tower, but that would affect the nice, flush deck lid as well and besides, couldn’t make up ½”.

These hinge brackets look too sturdy to bend without breaking a lot of other things. Have you had experience with this? Suggestions?

Thanks,

Herman

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal advisor:  

I would suggest buying a trunk/deck lid shim kit from one of the Corvette parts suppliers. There are three bolts on your drivers side trunk lid hinge........insert 2 shims in the bottom bolt.........it will make the top of the lid "dive down". A 1/2 inch is a lot to make up, but if this helps and does not create fit problems elsewhere you can continue to shim until the problem is solved. Worst case scenario....you will improve the fit. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

 

 

 

 

**********
Just a quick question. I have a 1961 Corvette and it may need a camshaft replacement. If the radiator assembly is removed, will the cam come out without pulling the engine out?
 
Thanks,
 
Dale

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Dale,
 
The simple answer is yes. But,you must remove the intake manifold, drop the front of the oil pan, remove the water pump, front engine support and the timing cover. Be sure to support the front of the motor because the 4 bolts holding the water pump also support the engine.

 

**********
Hi I need to replace a set of  seat covers on my newly acquired 1960 Corvette, any recommendation on price and quality please before I get it shipped to Australia.

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  You can purchase the correct seat covers from Al Knock ( the manufacturer) ,Corvette Central or Paragon reproductions. The all come from Al Knock, but Paragon will give you a discount if you ask.

 

 

**********

I am wanting to restore the C-1 steering gear box in my 1962 Corvette and I was reading an article on how to do so.  It mentioned in the article that there were special tools required but never said which ones they were or where they were used nor where to obtain them. 
 
Could you assist me in this area? 
 
Regards,
 
Darrell

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Darrel,
 
I have rebuilt many steering boxes over the years. I have never replaced the upper bearing race because it requires a special tool to remove the old one....and no one has it. All other bearings and races are easily replaceable using common garage tools. There are three hard parts to this job.........removing the steering box/ column from the car, cleaning the steering box and re instalation. Be sure to buy the upper column bearing and the 3 column seals. NOTE.....the firewall retaining plate only goes on one way. If you reverse it, you'll be removing the column again. I speak from experience. I always adjust the rebuilt box on the bench by feel. I don't have an inch pound puller. Once it is in the car, I readjust the sector to my liking. There should be a little drag in the center position. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Need a little help.  I’ve had my baby for 38 years.  Recently found some brittle wires in the ignition and under the dash wiring.  Replaced the whole thing with the correct colors and gauge wire.  When I removed the wires from the back of the Ammeter, I found that they were divided evenly between the right and left posts.  My wiring diagram shows that the black 12g from the battery terminal on the starter solenoid connects to the left post (viewing from the firewall) and the other four red wires are connected to the right post.  Another reference says exactly the opposite.  I’m inclined to go with the diagram from Chilton, black on left, red on right.  Any advice on my gut instinct will be greatly appreciated.  I’m anxious to get hooked up and start rolling again.  Thanks, Howard

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Howard,
It should be black on the right and red on the left looking from the firewall.If you connect it backwards you won't hurt anything. The gage will read in reverse. Is there any reason you didn't purchase a reproduction starter harness instead of building your own? Good luck.

**********
can you tell me what rear ends were available on a 62 vette? and my 62 has power windows , how can i tell if they are original or have been added?  thanks   Don

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Don,
 
250 and 300hp cars came standard with 3.36 open rear end. 3.08 was available with a 4 speed.
 
340 and 360hp cars with 3 speed got the 3.36 open as well.
 
340 and 360 with 4 speed got 3.70 open as standard and optional 3.08, 3.55,  4.11 and 4.56.
 
positraction was available with any gear choice and 3.55, 4.11 and 4.56 were available in positraction only.
 
 
995 62 Corvettes came equiped with power windows. Original switches have rounded corners and later switches have square corners. Also there should be a metal conduit between the door and the door jam to shield the power window wiring and a 40 amp curcuit breaker mounted on the fire wall above the heater with 12 gage red wire coming from the power window harness to one side and a similar wire connected to the other side of the breaker going to the starter motor.
 
Hope this info helps.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
First of all,I have really enjoyed the Corvette Restoration & Technical Guide. Can you please make some comments about the amount of allowable sterring wheel play. I"am restoring a 59. I have the body  off and I"m well on the way, but I do not know what extent to go on the sterring box because when I drove the car the sterring was not bad except for the little bit of play. Also I do not know what lube to put in the box?  Thanks for the help.  Eddie

From Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Inspect the gears for damage and wear......minor damage will create steering problems. Both the sector and worm gears should be convex.......NOT CONCAVE. Concave indicates significant wear which you may or may not be able to adjust out. If the gears look ok I would replace the bearings and seals ( I don't replace the upper race because I have never  figured out how to remove it) The C-1 corvette shop manual ST 12 explains the rebuild and adjustments in good detail. I use 680 weight gear oil in my steering boxes.
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Dear SACC:
 
What can be done to improve the handling on our curvy and hilly highways in Hawaii?  I have a ’58 with newer leave springs/2-inch lower block/urethane sway bar bushings/replace gas shocks in year 2000, but I hope to keep suspensions stock. 
 
Thanks for the tech help.
 
Aloha,
Eric

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Eric,
 
You could add radial tires, slightly wider wheels,a 60-62 rear sway bar, 59-62 traction bars, a fast steering adaptor, front wheel roller bearings, change the kingpin bushings to roller bearings( a shop here in S. Cal does that) and disc brakes. But you will still have a 53 year old car with 60+ year old suspension technology. In it's day, the 58 was probably the beat handling American car built.
 
Chip Werstein



**********
Hi

I'd like to know the birthdate and place of my 58 Vette. Number J585106771. can you help?

Bob

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:
Your 1958 would have been assembled 7 May 1958.

Max Brockhouse SACC President

 

 

 

 

**********

What can be done to improve the handling on our curvy and hilly highways in Hawaii?  I have a ’58 with newer leave springs/2-inch lower block/urethane sway bar bushings/replace gas shocks in year 2000, but I hope to keep suspensions stock. 

 Thanks for the tech help.

 Aloha,
Eric

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi;  If you have the original type tires on the car it will never handle very good.  Switch to Radials and a 20575R15 tire.  If it still does not handle the way you want it to go to a 6 inch rim.  There are several aftermarket wheels on the market ( watch the back set as it is critical ).  Also look back about 4 years in the Club magazine for a article on wheels written by me.  It uses a 6 inch wheel with the radials.  The handling is amazing. Should be about $500.00 + or - ready to mount tires.  If you have any questions contact me.  Enjoy the car. Thanks Larry

 

**********


What is the routing for heater hoses on a 60? Does the ¾ go under the motor/waterpump mount or can it run along side it without getting into the belt? A picture would be nice. All of the diagrams I’ve seen are not very clear. Thanks Gene

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  The hose goes in front of the motor mount.  What I do is use a black zip tie and tie it to the radio ground strap from the motor mount.  This works great as it will get into the belt if not done.   Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

**********

Hi
 
I am a member. Hope you can help me. My gas gauge always reads full, so I replaced the sending unit on the gas tank. It is still reads full all the time. I can change the gauge, but I'd like to be sure that I need a gauge and it's not a grounding problem or something else. I thought I read somewhere the fuel gauge had something to do with the turn signals? I have changed the turn signal cancelling unit. It seemed about this time the gauge started to show. fill.
 
Any ideas?
 
Thanks, Bob

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Bob,
 
1. check for power at the gage...... pink wire with ignition switch on .(note: there is no power going to the sending unit.)
 
2. check for loose connections at gage.
 
3. Check brown wire at sending unit to make sure it is not touching the black ground wire,
 
4. Check for instrument cluster ground wire @ instrument housing....usually attached at the speedometer bezel attaching screw, drivers side.
 
5. Check for main harness ground wire .....black wire, white stripe....at left valve cover.
 
 
If it still doesn't work, the problem must be the gage. Valley vettes in San Diego can rebuild it 619-461-1952. Good luck.
 
Chip Werstein

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer os SACC:  Hi  First check the fuel gauge in and of itself.  You have a hot wire and a ground wire.  Determine which is which and remove the ground wire.  Then make sure the terminal is clean and run a jumper wire direct to the ground side of the battery. If then the gauge still reads full then either the gauge is bad or a connection is bad from the sending unit. Next activate the turn signals to see if it has a incorrect reading. in your steering column you may have a grounding problem.   Grounding is a real problem in these older Corvettes.  Check all grounds.  Good Luck  enjoy the car.   Thanks Larry

**********

I would like a softer ride for my '62.
Is there a shock absorber that you would recommend?
 
Thanks.
 
Ken

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:

Ken,
 
I use current issue AC Delco gas shocks available from any good auto parts store. They are black and look original and give a very nice ride. However, new shocks will not compensate for damaged or worn out front/rear springs or other suspension parts.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Hi,I would like to know if the steering column and steering box can be removed from the car , and how do you get out? I have a 1957 corvette and my steering box is going bad.Is this something that can be done in the car ? Thanks JIM

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Jim,
 
I have been attempting to research this question. I am familiar with this job on 58-62, but 53-57 is much more complicated. First of all, the steering box can not be rebuilt in the car. The column and box must be removed as a unit. I always remove the left exhaust maifold and the pitman arm from the box to provide more clearence.
 
Once the box is loose at the frame, firewall and dash, you must slide it forward enough for the column to clear the dash........this is not as easy as it sounds because there is interference at the inner fender..........and it still may not come out. I have been told that the radiator and grill must be removed so the box/column can slide out thru the grill opening, but I can't confirm that. Also, be aware of the column opening in the dash as it is VERY easy to crack or break it during removal and installation.
 
I have done this job on two 57's, but the body was off the frame both times. It was still a very difficult job and I did not come thru the grill opening. I suggest you contact a couple reputable Corvette repair shops to research the job more before you jump into it. I would be interested to hear what you find out. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful.
 
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Recently, I purchased a Leaf spring re-build kit from Corvette Corner, for my '61 Vette. The instructions indicated that a "Signode Banding Tool / SRC-5823" was to be used to crimp the bands around leafs.  My research on the SRC-5823 is that it is a 5/8" single reverse notch joint type.
 
If I could find one of these to rent I would, but I refuse to pay full price for a new one. 
 (~$400)
 My questions are:
  1. is a single reverse notch joint type correct for the band?
  2. can another type and/or model number of banding tool be used?
 Thank you for any help you can provide!
 
Norm

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Advisor:  

Norm,
 
The SRC5823 is the correct crimping tool for C-1 rear springs. Any truck suspension repair shop should have one...........or any company who uses 5/8 metal banding for strapping . I bought one from a local construction supply house........not a Signode, but it looks/works just like it. Another friend of mine found an SRC 5823 cheap on ebay.
 
If you are attempting to restore your springs to NCRS standards with stainless steel bands, the crimping is the easy part.The bands which are sold by the various Corvette parts suppliers are too short....and they know it. Once you wrap it around the spring, there is not enough material remaining for the tentioning tool to grab and pull the strap tight. It takes me, 2 helpers with homemade tools to tension and crimp  the bands.
 
 
Chip Werstein

**********

Hello,
 
I was wondering if the 4 speed option for the 1959 Corvette was available from day one, or they produced only 3 speed cars initially.  Mine was built on December 18, 1958.  I do not have the original transmission and didn’t know if it would/could have come with a 3-speed or 4 speed.
 
Any help would be appreciated!

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  The 4-speed option for Corvette became available approximately April 15, 1957 (about two weeks after my 57 was built...), so all 59s could have had one.

 

 

 

 

From: Chip Werstein, SoCal Chapter Advisor:  

Dane,
 
In 59 (and 58 for that matter) 4 speeds were available from day one as an extra cost option.
 
Chip Werstein

 

**********

Hi-
 
I am restoring a 1960 vette and have a couple of questions.
 
-is the steering column painted the same color as the interior in 1960?
 
-how do you repair the license plate lights that are attached to the bumper. There are rivets holding a housing that keeps the lens in position. In order to replace the lens, do I drill out the rivets and replace with new or can they be pried out.
 
Thanks in advance for any advice,
 
Jim

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  The interior section of the steering column is interior color while the portion in the engine compartment is semi-gloss black.

The rivets will have to be drilled out and replaced. Make sure you have correct replacement rivets, before drilling out existing ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi,
 
I am looking at purchasing a 1962 Corvette  the info below has been provided:
 
1962 Corvette VIN # 20867S104263 Correct date coded 327/300 hp engine. Casting number 3782870. Date code K161. December 1961 vehicle build date. 4 speed transmission.
 
I am interested in it as a driver, but would like to know what all the codes mean.  As a driver any suggestions on what fuel to use?  87,89,93??  any fuel additive needed.
 
Thanks
 
Greg

 

From: Chip Werstein, Socal Chapter Board Member:  

Greg,
 
1962 Corvette # 4263 was built 12-19-61. The 870 block is the correct casting for a 62 327 motor. This block was cast 11-16-61 (K 16 1) which tells me it is most likely the original block. Use the highest octane pump gas available in your area with 1/2 qt. of aautomatic transmission fluid per full tank. This will prevent corrosion on the carb.
 
Chip Werstein

**********
Hello,
 
I was referred to your club in trying to get an answer to a C1 Corvette question for my dad.  He owns a 1957 Corvette and needs to replace the original tires, but would like to go back with something larger for better handling etc.  He (we) can't find anyone who can tell us how large of a new wheel and tire size setup he can put on WITHOUT having to make any modifications to the car.  Can you or any of your members possibly help?
 
Thank you, in advance, for your time and help.
 
Scott

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC:  

I have just replaced my '54 tires with Diamond Back radial tires and am VERY pleased with them. The original size is the same as the '57, 670X15. I suggest you go on line and google Diamond Back tires. They have all the info you need to select the proper tire.
Bruce

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi:  If you go back with the original bias tires it is not going to handle much better than it does now.  Coker tire has them. Better tire is a radial 205-75R15 and not the inexpensive ones.  Best is this about 4 years ago I wrote an article in the SACC magazine regarding a 6 inch rim. A back copy can be obtained for our editor. It has the correct bolt pattern and the back set.  Should run you $400 to 500 for a set of 4.  I have them on my 62 and the difference of handling is amazing.  The 205-75R15 is engineered for a 6 inch rim. Watch out for aftermarket rims as the back set may be incorrect.  Good luck and enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  

!957 Corvettes came with 5"wide x15" wheels as standard equipment; a 5.5" wheel was available with the heavy-duty brake option.  That being said, my 57 has been running 6" wide Kelsey-Hayes wire wheels (originally from a 1954 Buick Skylark) since circa 1963.  When I purchased the car from the original owner's widow 20 years ago the only change I made was adding 215.65R15 radials with only the occasional rear tire rubbing during hard cornering with a fully loaded trunk and passenger.  For your purposes a 205.75R15 radial tire should fit the original wheels and wheel wells with room to spare. (Note: radials make the car sooooo much more enjoyable to drive!)  If you're looking for newer rims be careful of two things: the offset (where the bolt holes are in relation to the rim) and especially the fact that non-Corvette 4.75" bolt pattern rims most likely do not have the bumps or dimples on the outer part to hold the stock wheel covers on - you might be watching a familiar hubcap roll by you!
 
"Sebring"Bill Herron

**********

Included with my 62 was a radiator that hopefully is the original.  the numbers in the cast inlet and outlet are: inlet is 3150896 and 01030 (looks like a date code) and outlet is 31560897 and 01031.  What is it for?
Pat 1277

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi  The 62 Radiator is an aluminum cross flow and part number 3150916 the supply tank is number 3151016. If it is an early car ( before S.N. 5,000 ) the number will be stamped into the top of the Radiator to the left of center. Characters were about 1/4 inch high.  Form that point forward to the end of 62's they used foil label with the date of manufacture also on the foil.  Go back and check your numbers because you should have a 7 digit number ( last one has a 8 digit number.).  I have no idea what the numbers are from.  Good Luck  enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

 

From: Bruce Fuhrman, Secretary of SACC:  The 62 radiator is an aluminum cross flow style. Early cars had a blue& silver aluminum Harrison tag screwed to the top right hand side if the radiator with part # and date..........later cars used a foil tag glued in the same location. The cast inlet # 3150896 was used on both 61&62 radiators, however they differed in that the 61 inlet had a square boss on the top. The NCRS 61-62 judging manual shows this very clearly.

 

 

 

 

 

**********

 

I FOLLOWED THE ADVICE FOR THE LAST C1 FUEL GAUGE PROBLEM BY RUNNING A SECOND GROUND WIRE FROM THE DASH POD TO THE ENGINE BLOCK BUT THE FUEL GAUGE STILL READS 1/8 UNTIL THE BRAKE PEDDLE IS PRESSED, THAN IT READS CORRECTLY.  WHAT NOW?
PAT 1277

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi  I believe you still have a grounding problem.  (1) recheck your new wire from fuel gauge to the ground it must me a clean surface on both ends.  (2) move the ground wire from the dash pod to the ground side of the fuel gauge ( 3) Your brake lights may not be grounded correctly.  ( 4) check all grounds on the car.   The reason I still believe you have a grounding problem is that the fuel gauge works when it is grounded.   If none of these works contact me.   Thanks Larry

 

**********
Hi

Still waiting for my membership response .

I've recently had my 58 Vette tuned (283ci and 245 hp with dual 4brl carters and dual point distributor). New points,plugs,wires, condenser, rotor, dual points, all timed.

In first gear I"'m ok but when I get into second gear and hit 2500 rpm or 3rd gear at 3000 rpm or higher, the car chokes or hesitates.

I've been told by a local mechanic to replace the distributor and the carbs. I've done some additional research and I've been told it could the vacuum advance that needs to be replaced in the distributor.

I love the Vette but it's not running right. Can you offer some help?

Thanks, Bob

From:  Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi;  First go to a shop that understands carburetor's and vacuum advances.  ( Not your average shop).  It could be any of the three or parts of the three.  You need to have a scope analysis first.  Let me know Thanks Larry

 

 

**********
Hi

I have applied for membership about a month ago but no response from the club yet. Hope to hear soon. However that' s not the point of the email.

I have a 1958 corvette. My parking brake or hand brake or emergency brake ( pick a name) is working but the red dash light stays on all the time. I checked and there's a switch mounted with a bracket on the shaft of the bake itself. It very old probably original. As easy as it is to find replacement parts for the Vette, I've checked every Corvette catalogue as well as diagrams of the hand brake and there's no switch to be found. Am I missing something?

Any information you have I'd really appreciate it

Thanks, Bob

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi:  The hand brake has a switch attached to the top of brake handle rod under the dash.  It is about 1 inch wide, 1/2 inch thick and about 2 inches tall.  It activates the light on the dash.  Try Corvette Central they should have one.  If not run a wanted ad for the switch.  It is easy to install.  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********
I am in middle of restoring a 1960 (# 00867S103804) Corvette. I have recently purchased a restored 1960, no rust, rolling chassis. I have some more body work to do but am starting to consider the paint. The car was Roman Red / Ermine White when I bought it but careful check shows the original color was Tasco Turquoise / Ermine White. I plan to return to the original color. My question is: aside from the external color combo, how do I find out the rest of the paint colors such as engine compartment, trunk, wheel wells, whether there are unpainted areas on the underbody of the car, etc.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  Hi  In the engine compartment the colors are various shades of G.M. Semi Gloss.  All the parts were assembled after painting ( no paint on the bolts). Hence the various shades.  The trunk is painted the same color as your car. Tasco Turquoise and not very good ( on the top of the wheel wells will show little or no paint.  The Wheel wells are painted G.M. semi gloss ( the splash pans (front) were painted then assembled.  You need black under coating on top of the wheel wells under the car.(Quote) and not very neat.  The bottom of the body under the car has no paint and should show raw fiberglass, and no evidence of paint.   Noland Adams has a great book out that you need to purchase.  Also buy the NCRS judging guide for the 58 to 60 cars. Good luck  Thanks Larry

**********

I have an original 1957 inside mirror that has an S stamped on the shaft.  What does that S mean?

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Lynn,

GM bought parts from many sources. Most parts had a manufacturer’s identification mark on it. I used to know the names of the mirror manufacturers, and I think there were two in the fifties. Look on other pieces and you may find a logo, or a number or letter or two. It’s a matter of quality control- send GM a faulty part and you’re blacklisted.  Before he retired, I knew a Chevrolet Engineer who could look that information up for me.

 -Noland Adams

**********

Would I be right in guessing a September 1961 build on my 1962. VIN is 20867S100651.  Thank you.

 Michael

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:

Build date for #651 would be September 18, 1961.  FYI, only 20 cars built that day, the last  number was 654.

 

 

 

**********
Max,
A while back you helped me with my birthday, I am ready to stencil my car and Quanta recommends my build date at
6-18-58.
I consider your date as correct, can you confirm.
Thanks again for your great website and tech advice!

Steve

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:
Go for it, my notes say the last car built June 18, '58 was #7963.  The last car built June 19, '58 was #7991.  The last car built June 17, '58 was #7934.

Max Brockhouse, SACC President

 

 

 

**********

Hello i am doing a body off restoration on my 1958 Corvette and i know the vin numbers are on the body and the chassis but the engine does it have the same numbers on the engine as the body or should they be different and also how would i Join your Club also?

 

Thank You

From:  Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  The vin numbers were not stamped on the front engine pad until early 60.  You should have only one number on the engine pad.  It starts with F then the date it was assembled and the engine horsepower code ( with the trans). Enjoy the car.  Larry

 

 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Joe, This is a common problem with 1958 to 1962 Corvettes. There is one ground wire between the instrument cluster and chassis ground. The fuel level varies when one steps on the brakes (brake lights) and the turn signals are on. These extra electrical currents overload the ground wire, and you get a false fuel level. The cure is to add an extra ground wire between the instruments and chassis ground. Let me know how this works out.

Regards, Noland Adams


**********


I have a 1962 Corvette and did a frame off restoration. I replaced
all the wiring and put a new fuel sender unit in the gas tank. The
fuel gauge is original. The problem I have is that the fuel gauge
reads about a quarter of a tank low however, when I step on the brake
pedal and the brake light goes on the gauge reading is correct. Since
everything is new I am at a loss to what is causing this.

Thank you,
Joe

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi : This is a common problem on the cars. It is a grounding problem.

Double check your wires at the ground connection. Also you can hide a wire

going directly to ground. Enjoy Larry

**********


Hi,

> I recently purchased a 1961 corvette. Can you send me information

> on joining your club?  Can you tell

> me the date of manufacture for my car? The vin is 10867s106967.

From:  Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi: Your Vin indicates that the car was assembled in the first week of

April 1961. Have fun, Larry

 

 

 


**********
I think I am being 'jacked around' by a well known carb rebuilder.

What are the proper numbers for a 3059S Carb for 00867S104255,
Feb 26th 1960.

Thanks:
Bill

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  The Chevrolet part number is 3779178 ( with a low choke )  Hope this helps.  Enjoy the car. Larry

 

 

**********

 

 

**********

I am not a member, but I have a simple question:  What are the octane ratings for the 1962
Corvette, 327 Engine?  Do I need to run leaded fuel?  I am not sure of the horsepower, 270 to 300

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  If your engine is in good condition, I would add some lead to the fuel.  If the engine was rebuilt and has harden valve seats should be no problem, unless you are running it at high RPM's. Then you need lead.  I would add some zinc additive unless you have roller lifters. Your horsepower is either 250 or 300 with juice lifters.  Enjoy the car.  Larry

 

 

 

**********
Two questions, first, I am going to lift the body off the frame on my 61. should I remove the doors and brace the opening or can the doors just be left on the way they are. Second, I am going to replace my windshield, dash pad, and dash wiring, is there a recommended sequence or any tips? Thanks, A.J.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi; I would remove the doors and make a brace for each side to attach to the upper front hinge and the lock striker on the back. You can use theoriginal bolts to attach the supports. There is very little support on thebody through the center. I made mine form 1 inch pipe with welded flat steel on the ends, drilled to fit the holes, and the worked great. Adjust them to the exact opening of the door when the car is attached to the frame before lifting. This is the sequence I use. Remove the instrument cluster, center items, and right side grab bar. Then the windshield ( be careful as there are two bolts on each side to the back that are hard to get at) The frame and windshield come off together. Then what wiring you have remaining and them take off the old dash pad in about 1million pieces. On the installation of the new dash pad make double sure that you have the pad fit to the car before gluing it down. Both sides need to be installed for fit first. You will take off quite a lot of the foam backing for the fit. Make sure the end caps fit. The dash pad material goes under the windshield. If you have original wiring I would replace it all for safety. Good luck Larry

**********

I am the owner of a 1961 Corvette.  I am not a member yet however, I am in the process of sending in the application.  This club seems very worth while.  I have a question regarding two rubber seals that I purchased from a corvette parts supplier.  These are rectangular rubber seals which are supposed to be mounted on each side of the radiator somewhere.  They each have three small holes along the edge of the seals but I just cannot figure out where and how they mount.  I have looked at all the assembly books and manuals including Nolan's restoration book but I just can't figure out any details on where and how to mount these seals.  They seem to look like they might be used to make sure that all air is directed into the radiator but there is no indication of where to mount them.  Any ideas?
 
Mike

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  On your radiator seals, if you have an original radiator core support and the original fan shroud there are no side rubber seals on the 250hp and the 300hp cars.  Only the high horse cars had them.  The fan shroud was attached directly to the core support on the sides on these low horse cars.   Enjoy the car.  Larry. 

**********

Hi,

I found you on your solidaxle website.  I’ve got a question about a ’61 Corvette.  I am having starting problems and trying to remove the ignition to replace it.  What’s the trick to getting this out of the dash?  Is there a special tool and can I make due without it?

Any ideas are highly appreciated.

Thank you,
Jeff

 

From: Bill Herron, Treasureer of SACC:  

Jeff,
 
I believe your ignition switch is similar (if not nearly the same) as the one in my 57, so the removal procedure should be the same.  Take a paper clip and straighten out one end.  Place the ignition key in the ignition lock and turn the key all the way to the left, insert the straightened end of the paper clip into the small hole to the right of the key and push in (you may have to move the lock around a bit for just the right place).  Once you find it and push the clip in, pull the lock unit out using the key.  (At least that's how it's worked for me for the majority of my GM cars over the years.)
 
"Sebring"Bill Herron

**********

Question:  is it OK to have the pinion angle pointed upwards?  In other words is that how it should be from factory?  I have a ’58 Corvette with 2” lowering block on leaf springs, so driveshaft angle is a little sharp (maybe 6-degrees above level) at differential side.  Transmission angle is level.

  Aloha,

Eric

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Eric,

  Corvette transmissions in the fifties (like your ’58) were similar to passenger car transmissions, including Powerglide, 3 speed manual, and 4 speed manual. In a passenger car, the drive shaft was quite long. The transmission’s tailshaft (output) housing was longer, making the driveshaft a few inches shorter, which eliminated whipping of a long driveshaft. Corvette transmissions had shorter tailshaft housings because the front u-joint had an extreme angle. If a front u-joint was to be operated at such a sharp angle, the trunnions of the u-joint could jam against each other and destroy the u-joint. Chevrolet avoided this extreme u-joint angle by installing rebound straps just above each rear spring. If a Corvette drove over rough road (like a railroad crossing) the rear axle housing could only drop out of alignment a short distance, and the front u-joint never reached enough of a sharp angle to destroy itself.

  I can’t quite envision your u-joint angle as you described it. I would put the car up on a lift that has lifting points under the frame. Put the transmission in neutral and lift the car under the frame. Do not start the car while it is on the lift! The rear differential’s drop will be limited by the rebound straps or the leaf springs. Now turn the rear wheels and observe the operation of the front u-joint as the driveshaft rotates. If the u-joint has internal interference it will likely destroy itself sometime in the future.

  Get back to me if there is a problem, and perhaps I can help. You might want to remove the lowering blocks and get the rear springs rebuilt and rearched. If it were mine, I would improve the handling by: 1) remove the lowering blocks. 2) Have the rear springs rebuilt. 3) Install new Delco low pressure gas shock absorbers made for early Corvettes. These are the cheapest shocks available, and they work the best!

  Good Luck, Noland Adams

**********
Hello,

I was wondering if you could give me some guidance on removing the hubcap on a 1961 corvette.  I have a flat and want to change it.  It seems like it shoul be pretty basic, but I don't want to damage it while removing it.  thanks so much.
Steve

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Steve, I assume you are talking about the full sized wheelcover, as opposed to the small “dog dish” hubcap. The wheelcover is stamped from a thick alloy, so it thicker and heavier than it may appear. There is indented area around the outer surface of the wheelcover. The wheel itself has a number of raised “bumps” in its inner rim. These “bumps” are stamped from the inside, so they appear raised. The indented area in the edge of the wheelcover is forced over the raised bumps to install the wheelcover by tapping the edge of the wheelcover carefully with a rubber hammer. The wheel cover is removed by prying around the wheelcover with a large screwdriver. Go easy, as all you want to do is move the wheelcover over the little bump. Pry a little at several places until the wheelcover pops off.

  You are right; this material can be damaged easily, so proceed slowly.

  Good luck,

  Noland Adams

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi  Take a flat screwdriver and press it on the side that is easy between the cap and the rim.  Pry with the handle to loosen the cap, only do a small amount of lifting.  Then repeat the process several times, each time the cap will come a little further out. and you should be about a quarter to half way around the cap.  At this time the cap should come off. When you replace the cap put the cap with the valve stem first and work around both sides.  If you do have a soft rubber hammer, sit down facing the cap with your shoes off and use your  feet.  Make sure it is tight all the way around.   Enjoy the car.  Larry

**********
I have a 1961 corvette, the deck lid needs adjustment. The front part of the lid sets down about i/4 inch from the body. I do not have the weatherstrip on yet. Is there a way to adjust the lid by the springs? I have the car ready for the paint shop and wanted hood, doors and lid to fit good. Any help would be good. Jim

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Jim; First question is did the deck lid fit before the restoration? If it did it was the weather strip that held it up. If this is a different deck
lid that you have a different problem, either way you will need to make some
adjustment. You need to shim up the lid between the springs and the lid. It should fit correctly before painting. The weather strip should be soft so
that the lid compresses it to make it water tight. Be sure to check the
lock to make sure that everything fits before painting. Good Luck Enjoy thecar. Larry

**********

First of all, thank you very much for your extremely prompt reply to my earlier inquiry regarding bare 327 CSB, casting code 3782870, casting date A152, stamped FOII8RJ.  Unfortunately, I neglected to include the VIN for the car I am thinking about using this bare block for in my earlier request for technical support.   

  I have been told that my 1962 Corvette, VIN:  20867S105822, was assembled at the Saint Louis , MO assembly plant on 01/23/62.  Can you verify that build date?

  Again, thank you very much for your assistance.

  Respectfully,

  Wayne

From:  Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Wayne ,

  To determine a Corvette’s birthday I use The Corvette Birthday Book, compiled by Dennis Moore. Dennis has taken all of the known production dates and service bulletins and produced a 1953 to 1982 Corvette production date calendar. Your previous owner must have used this same reference, because I came up with the same date: Tuesday January 23, 1962.

  Now, let’s get that ’62 running!

  Later, Noland

**********
Last summer my dad gave me his 1959 corvette. When I was a kid it was our everyday car. It has been sitting for 10 years and I am trying to get it running. what I have found is that things have been modified. The engine has the generator mounted on the left side instead of the right (i believe it is a 1963 vette engine) the voltage reg is also on the left and not the right. my question has to do with the fuel line. I noticed the metal line runs from the back to the front of the car but was disconnected and replaced with a rubber line that goes from the sending unit to a cylinder (possibly an electronic fuel pump) mounted on the frame under the passenger seat (with an electrical wire going "somewhere") from there the rubber line goes to the fuel pump on the block then of coarse to the carb. is this normal?

  Speaking of fuel, do i just run regular unleaded when I do get it running?

  Thanks,

  JR

From: Noland Adams, Founding president of SACC:  

JR, before I recommend a grade of fuel I’d like to know more about your engine. Unless it’s a high horsepower engine with high compression and solid lifters, regular unleaded will perform well for you.

  The addition of an electric fuel pump mounted under the passenger seat is certainly unusual. Normally the metal line runs from the tank to the fuel pump, where a special flexible line is attached. Then a metal line runs from the mechanical fuel pump up the front of the engine to the carburetor. Perhaps there was a problem with vapor lock, and the electric fuel pump was added to eliminate that situation. The fuel pump wire is probably connected to the ignition switch so that when the ignition is on the fuel pump is working. If the fuel line doesn’t leak, and the electric fuel pump works, it should run okay even if the mechanical fuel pump is bad. If you have any fuel starving problems I would replace the mechanical fuel pump.

  If you want to return the fuel system to an original type system you can refer to the Restoration Book I wrote (expensive at $75.00 postage paid) or get a copy of the Assembly Instruction Manual (AIM) for about $20.00. AIMs are available at your favorite Corvette parts sources like Corvette Central or Corvette Stop at 530) 677-4270.

  I hope this helps,

  Noland Adams

**********

I stumbled across your site and although not yet a member would like to put out a call for your technical assistance. I just recently acquired a bare 327 engine block that I am thinking about installing in my 1962 Corvette that the former owner said was produced on 01/23/62 based upon the VIN.  It currently has no engine in it.  The engine block casting number is 3782870, with a casting date of A152.  The block has an assembly code stamped on it of F0II8RJ. 

  From the casting codes, I suspect that this block can be used to build a reasonably correct motor for my car since the block was cast on 01/15/62.  I believe that the stamped assembly code indicates that this block was cast in Flint and that at least a long block was assembled on January 18, 1962, but I don’t know what the alphabetical suffix, “RJ” means.  BTW – There is no VIN stamped on this block in front of or around the assembly code and no evidence of tampering such as milling off a previous VIN.

 

My gut is telling me that this may be a factory replacement block that was special ordered by a dealer for a warranty replacement installation or sale by their parts department, but that is just my gut talking to me.  What does the RJ suffix mean?

  Any sage opinion would be greatly appreciated.

  Very respectfully,

  Wayne 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Wayne , let’s start with what we know. You didn’t include your ‘62s serial number, so we’ll accept Jan. 23, 1962 as the car’s assembly date. 3782870 is the correct block casting number for a 1962 or 1963 327 cid Chevrolet engine. The casting date of A152 identifies the block being cast at the grey iron foundry in Saginaw , Michigan on January 15, 1962. The engine number F0118 means the engine was assembled at the Flint V8 plant on January 18th. Actually, the two ones in the date should be the capital letters “II”. We’ll get to the “RJ” suffix later.

  A calendar of events would show: engine block cast on January 15, 1962

  Engine assembled in Flint V8 plant on 0II8, which means January 18 (1962)

  Your 1962 Corvette was assembled in St.Louis on January 23, 1962

  A time line check shows 3 days between the 15th and the 18th, the minimum time between the foundry in Saginaw and the engine assembly plant in Flint . The time from January 18th to January 23rd is only five days, normally not enough time to send the completed engines from Flint to St. Louis by rail. However, we have documented cases where the St. Louis assembly plant was low on new engine assemblies. In those cases, truckloads of new engines were shipped overnight from Flint to St. Louis . There was even a couple of times where 3 pallet loads (18 engines) were sent by air rather than shut down the Corvette assembly line. So even the short period of five days was enough to get the engines to the assembly line on time.

  Now we come to the engine number suffix “RJ”. I have several reference books that list engine number suffixes and their combinations of equipment. The suffix “RJ” does not appear in any 1962 or 1963 list. By being assembled on January 18 (0II8), we know the engine was being built for a Chevrolet of some type to  be assembled in late January or February. I bought a new long block Chevrolet engine in 1960, and its engine pad was unstamped. I had to go to the nearest Chevrolet dealer to get it stamped, and they wouldn’t even let me watch! So I know that new long blocks came from the factory unstamped. But the suffix “RJ” remains an unidentified mystery.

  Bottom line: the dates on the engine would work for your ‘62, but the engine number would be incorrect.

  I hope this helps,

  Noland Adams

**********

I have a 58 283-290hp vette and have been considering replacing the 283 with a 350 to save the motor and to be able to drive the car longer distances and not have to worry about the engine. I know I can reuse the fuelie unit and distributor, but will I have to install an 097 cam in the 350 so that the unit works properly and how will that affect the 350's performance ? Also will the unit have enough air flow for a stock 350 and will it have to be recalibrated or is it ok as is ?

Thanks

Mike

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Mike, The 283 is a good engine, so I do not know why you would want to "save" it. If its internal condition is in doubt, have it rebuilt, which would include new rings and pistons, line boring the camshaft and crankshaft bearings, and having it carefully balanced. If any part of the 283 is questionable, then have the 350 rebuilt. You should be able to drive either the 283 or the 350 long distances without concern about engine failure.

If you use the 350, you would want to use a good moderate cam and solid lifters. Unless you intend to do a lot of racing or fast driving at open throttle, you will not need the 097 cam. Either the 283 or the 350 will give you plenty of power for driving on the streets at legal speeds. Since you will not be driving at full throttle on the streets for any length of time, I expect the 290 hp FI unit on the 350 will perform satisfactorily. However, I am not an FI expert, and such a person might recommend a recalibration of the FI unit.

Good Luck.

Noland Adams

**********

What is the proper way to clean a 1959 corvette sealed air cleaner?   Thank you.

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  There is no proper way.  This is what I have used.  After removal use lacquer thinner and apply a small amount from the inside to the screen then blow out with air pressure.  This takes a little time and may take several applications.  BE sure you let the thinner dry over night and blow out again.  Do not put back on the car if you can smell any thinner.  Be Careful.   Enjoy Thanks Larry

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Peter,

  The 1958/59 Corvette air cleaner was sealed, as you noted. There were never any instructions for cleaning the element; the only choice was to replace the entire sealed air cleaner assembly. I can’t imagine what Chevrolet’s engineers were thinking. Perhaps they would recommend scrapping the car when the air cleaner element became clogged. About all you can do is immerse the entire assembly in solvent, slosh it around, and then try to get the element back in its original position in the housing.

  The long term answer is to purchase a 1960 air cleaner assembly and use a replaceable paper element.

  Good Luck,

  Noland Adams

**********
I have a 1962 corvette.  These are all the numbers that I can read and they may not be right.  20867s103347 , 3782870, 17340.  It has a 4 barrel carter af b carb. 4 speed manual transmission.  I cannot make out the number on the head.  What can you tell me about the car.  Any information would be greatly appreciated. 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Don, you don’t give us enough numbers to work with. 20867S103347 is the serial number of the car, stamped on a small metal plate spot welded to the steering column housing under the hood. 3783870 is the casting number of the block. I have no idea what 17340 means.

  We need 1) engine block casting date, located on the opposite side of the block from the casting number. It’s in small characters- today, January 19, 2011, would be shown as A191. 2) The engine number is stamped on a raised pad on the right front of the block, next to the end of the head. 3) Each head has a raised casting number and date hidden under the valve covers, similar to - but smaller than - the block’s casting number and date. 4) The generator’s part number and assembly date which are stamped in code into the main housing. 5) The distributor’s part number and assembly date which are stamped in code on a metal strip around the main housing.

  After we get this information, we will try to tell you more about your 1962 Corvette.

  Thanks for asking,

  Noland Adams

**********

After several months I am still trying to find out some history on my 62 ser #20867S100193.  Every time I start getting close, I seem to run into a wall. Or some one who is helping me passes away. I have good reason to believe my car was used in the route 66 TV series and would like to talk with someone that knows of any more of these cars or anyone that might help me in any way. I do not want to sell the car or capitalize from this. I just want any help I can get. If Noland Adams or anyone has any ideas or needs any of my information that I have so far, please let me know. Any help would sincerely be appreciated. Thanks so much Gary . Email sqrdeal@grm.net

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Gary ,

I’m sure someone keeps records of the Route 66 tv show, and the Corvettes that were used on the show. I don’t have any information about the show and the Corvettes, although I did meet both actors years ago. I did know a guy that kept records about the shows and the cars that were used. He died several years ago, and I don’t know what happened to his files. I have tried to come up with his name, and it seems his first name was Kermit. I suggest Ken Amrick run an article asking for information about the show and its cars. This is important to SACC members, and I’ll bet a lot of members aren’t aware of the old Route 66 Show and its impact on Corvettes.

Good Luck, Noland Adams

**********

Gentlemen,

 I am restoring a 1961 corvette and was searching the web for an answer
to a problem and discovered your tech page. The problem I have is
when the body is off the frame, the driveshaft angle is too steep and
the universal joint binds on the yoke and will not allow the shaft or
rear wheels to turn. The rebound straps are not installed and the
engine and transmission are in the frame. Are the rebound strap
 required to keep the axle high enough to eliminate this, due to noT
enough weight on the frame since the body is off, or is there another
problem? This is my first corvette and would hate to have a serious
problem after getting it on the road. The car had no engine or tranny
when I bought it, and I installed a '63 corvette 327 w/ 4speed muncie
 and drive shaft that came from a running 1957 vette.
Thanks for any help you may give, 

Travis

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  

Travis,

You're absolutely correct about the rebound straps; they are there to keep the rear axle travel from doing just what's happening to your chassis. The driveshaft angle is rather severe from the factory (due to the x-member frame design) and there's not much room before it interferes with something. That's also a reason for the extended length yoke - to allow for the severe angle without coming off the transmission spline. Drop a spare engine block on the rear of the chassis (we all have one lying around in the garage, right?) or better yet, connect the rebound straps  Hope you have fun and drive it when it's done!

Bill Herron

**********
I'm not a member but hope you can help me. I have a 62 with the 327 340 HP engine. It is always overheating. Pulled the radiator and had it checked. Replaced the thermostat. Replaced all the hoses. All shrouds are in place. Any thoughts?  Thanks.   Bob

From Doc Hollada, website editor, Midwest Regional Rep:  Bob, you might decide to join SACC.  It is easy, simply while at the website, click on Our Membership, download the application form, which is a pdf file, then send it in.  You will enjoy the club magazine, On Solid Ground, plus the other advantages of membership.

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Bob,

  There could be many reasons for overheating
 
1) What temperature thermostat is in the cooling system? I like a 180 degree thermostat.

2) Check the timing. It may be as simple as a retarded distributor.

3) I like Prestone, which I use at a 50 percent ratio; half water, half Prestone. This is the best coolant ratio for the transfer of heat, plus the corrosion inhibitors in the coolant are activiated at the 50 percent ratio.

4) Make sure your fan is mounted in the right direction. Seriously, I have seen two restored solidaxle Corvettes with the fan blades trying to blow air through the radiator. And they were both overheating!

5) It’s obvious, but check the belts for conditions and the correct tension. You may want to remove the water pump and check the pump impeller for unusual wear or missing vanes. Perhaps the coolant is not being pumped fast enpugh.

 

Good Luck,

 

Noland Adams

**********

Hi,   
I have a 1961 Corvette s/n 10867S110063. I'd like to find out the date of manufacture and how the car came equipped. Some of the reproduction parts I would like to buy for it are listed as "late or early 1961". Would my car be considered late or early, as they don't give any serial number breaks.
I'm also trying to find the vin stamping on the frame. I've tried cleaning the frame and looking with a mirror but have had no luck. Do you have any tips on doing this short of lifting the body off the frame? I'm looking in the area under the drivers seat.
 
Thank you for your time, Mike

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  

Your 1961 was born in St. Louis on September 5, 1960

 

 


From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi, Serial Number 110063 is a very early production 61 ( first week of September 1960)( 6th to the 9th).  The car could have left- over 1960 parts ( GM most always used up the parts from prior years). So any late 60 or early 61 will work on your car.  Remember, when you buy the reproduction parts most have slight difference's ( some very major) from the original. The fit and function should be OK.
On the frame stamping even if you pull the body you may not find it.  Rust on the top of the frame eats away at the numbers.  These numbers generally were not stamped very deep.  Look forward and backward from where you are looking and you may or may not see them.  I have looked at a bunch of frames with very little rust and most are not readable. Their is no easy way to lift the body a few inches without doing everything that is required for a full body off.  Thanks and enjoy the car  Larry
Hi;  Sorry, I am late on this as we were gone for a while.  On your numbers lets put a , in the vin number.  They started with 100,000  and your car is 100,063 ( first week of Sept 60) The last number in Sept is 101,052  Car number 110,160 was in fact made in June.  This should clear this up.
On the options your car came with it is very difficult to tell.  You can tell it was a fuel-injected, all the rest were carbs.  If you have the original engine the last two letters on the engine build date stamp ( front of the pad) will tell you.  If the original engine is gone you are out of luck.  3 or 4 speed if it was changed who knows. With a automatic there will be some special brackets on the frame.  On the tops do you have the back latches on the deck lid if so are there one or two sets. On power windows if the door panels are changed, who knows.  The more your car has been restored at, without the original paper work you will never know.
Hope this helps.  Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 


**********
I bought a true basket case 1958 corvette. when I say basket case I mean no frame ,no front end ,no any thing. It now has a fram & frontend along with a lot of other used parts but the thing I cant find is a vin plat & title. this car was in a field broken apart & left to rot.it is now ready for paint etc. do you have any suggestions were to purchase a vin plate & title for a 58,59,or1960 vette ?I would get a reconstucted title but I cant get antique plates with one. please help !!! 
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  You will need to check with the Department of Motor Vehicles in your state, generally you car will need an assigned vin number and it will receive an assembled title.  In my state it works like this:  You take all of the receipts and the car ( either on a trailer or drive it) to DMV.  They want to know where you acquired the parts, and if any original or assigned numbers are on the parts.  All assembled and or kit cars in my state cannot get antique plates.  ( They can here after the car has been registered for 30 years).
I wish you good luck in your project.  Thanks Larry

**********

Hello,
I have a 54 that I have slowly been restoring and I got to the point where I need paint. I was able to find paint code numbers easily enough and I can get polo white without any problem. Sportsman red is another story. Even though I have a PPG code as well as a Dupont and Valspar code no one seems to be able to mix it for me. I have been to several auto paint specialty stores and they tell me the PPG code doesn't work on their paint mixing machines. I was wondering if others have had this problem and would you have know where I could purchase Sportman Red in a single stage urethane. Or is there another Chevrolet red that is the same as Sportsman Red. Any insight into this issue would be much appreciated.
Thanks,
Mitch

From: Ken Amrick, Editor and Publisher of On Solid Ground:  

Hi Mitch,
I have found a company on the internet at www.tcpglobal.com that has color formulas back to about 1900.  I have been purchasing from them and they haven't let me down yet. The last time they found and mixed a rare springtime only color for a 1958 Ford product that no one could mix locally.  You won't find the '54 corvette colors in their color library. So email "Jimmy Chips" and tell him what you need. He mixes the hard ones.  Look around on their site and you will see how to email him.  They can mix PPG or lesser price/quality Restoration Shop paint. I have purchased both paint lines depending on the quality of car I'm working on, and found both very good. Prices are also better than I can do locally most of the time, even when adding in the shipping cost.   They mix anything you want...acrylic enamel,  single and two stage urethane, or acrylic lacquer. Good luck,  Ken Amrick

**********

I recently bought a 1959 chevy apache truck , it was said to have a 1958 corvette motor , I was wondering if you could verify this. the front engine tab says F0129D,  the rear engine casting no. is 3756519, The head casting no. is 3731539. any help is greatly appreciated.  thanks   AL

From: Ken Amrick, Editor and Publisher of On Solid Ground:  

Al,
The pad stamp indicates it was built in (F) Flint on (01) January (29) 29 and is (D) a 185 hp passenger car/truck motor 2v Carb and Powerglide - not a Corvette motor.  The casting number ...519 block was used on all 283 motors in 1959 (maybe late 1958) through I think about 1961.  You can determine what year the motor is by looking at the casting date. Look for it usually around the rear of the block. It will be a letter, then 2 or 3 digits. Letter will be the month cast. Yours will probably be L (December) or A (January) followed by one or 2 digits. That is the day of the month it was cast. And finally the last digit which is the year it was cast 8 (1958) 9 (1959) etc. 
The ...539 head was not used on the 185 hp engines. Those engines used ...537 heads and some other heads, but not 539 heads.  Either you read it incorrectly, or the heads were put on this engine later.  539 heads were used on passenger cars and some Corvettes in 1957. 
Hope all this helps.  If your truck was originally a Powerglide, this may very well be the correct motor, but not the heads.  Ken Amrick

**********

Greetings - recently replaced my biasply tires w/ Coker Radials... on 
a 1958 Corvette - problem is I keep throwing hubcaps...? They stayed 
on at all speeds for the entire season before changing to radials but 
 the rears can not make it 5 miles now without flying off and fronts 
appear loose too when I check them. I've tried differing combos of 
wheel/hubcaps and rebalanced assemblies several times etc. Is this 
common? what might I be able to do to rectify this as I'm at a loss & 
 just remove caps until I get to where I'm parking - quite a bother to  say the least!

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi; Your most likely problem is you wheels. Over the years your wheelsbegin to flex more and more. A hubcap that is attached to the wheel ( notthe spider or the center of the wheel) it does not take much to have it come off. Most likely you need new wheels. The 55 and 56 Car wheels are that 
same with some minor exceptions. There is a chance that one or more of your
hubcaps are sprung and will not stay on any wheel. If you lay the caps on a level 
surface they are not flat on the bottom, your cap is sprung. You have
 
a wall hanging. Enjoy the car Thanks Larry

From: Bill Herron, Treasurer of SACC:  

The original wheels for your Corvette had four "bumps" around the inside ofthe outer rim to hold the wheel covers on. If the wheels have been changedto "bumpless" wheels you caps will come and go as they please.
"Sebring"Bill Herron

 

 

 

**********

Hi I Have A 58 Vette, When I Put It Up On My Car Lift On The Passenger Side, The door gap gets wider by the door handle, opening up toward the front, if I put the car back on all tires the gap closes up, and I can close the door, if the car is on the lift and I open the door it will not latch, on the drivers side everything is ok, if I lift the car very slowly you can see the gap open, could tell me why you think this is happening, And what can I do To repair the problem, Thank You Jerry

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  The problem is your frame.  In a Corvette the frame was made very stiff with little or no flex, as all of the strength is in that frame.  While on the lift inspect the frame and you will find rusted parts that are very thin.  If it appears that the frame has several areas of problems you need a new frame. If the car has undercoating clean that off first.  It is possible to put a frame section in the car. but your Corvette needs to come apart to even do that.  It is not cheep ( ouch ) to do this repair.  Be very careful driving the car with this much give in the frame. Thanks Larry

**********

Ever hear of a 1960 Corvette early one that had 1959 Seat covers on it from factory

Thanks
Bill

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  That could happen, but it would need to be very early in the 60 production, possibly in the first 200 or so.  Take a good look at the seat covers and see it they have been replaced. Look at the bolts holding the seats to the car, if they have been removed.  Your question is why?  If they have someone just put the wrong year seats on the car. Enjoy the car  Thanks Larry

 

**********

Hi

I need to replace my windshield on my 1960. My first thoughts were to replace it myself, but I have gotten feedback that it is not as easy as it would appear. I did get a quote from one local corvette restoration shop. The quote seemed high ($1800) to me but there again I do not have any experience to compare it against. It does include replacing all the seals qnd a dated windshield. Does this seem reasonable? Does any anyone know of another source to go to? I live in Schenectady, N.Y.

Thanks

Rick

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi The cost of a new windshield ( date coded ) is about $600.00, non date coded is about $400. Now installation, in general you need to remove most of the dash to get the bolts that hold the windshield on,( they are under the dash.) Caution make sure you get the two on the back corners or you will need some repair work on the frame. The windshield and frame come off in one piece. Then the frame comes apart. You will need new gasket material to set the new glass into. then reinstall the windshield. The odds are great that the top will need adjusting to make the canvas fit correct. This takes an expert for the top. Time if all goes really good 6 to 8 hours, if problems will take a lot longer. Ask the shop if they have installed a  early Corvette windshield? If not go to another shop. Good Luck Thanks

Larry

 

**********

Hi there

I am a solid-axle Corvette enthusiast here in Germany.Unfortunitaly not too many experts are here arround to answer my following question correct. My Corvette has no matching No engine,because the engine is stamped with the following Number: :F07171787,casting nr is;3789935,which coud be a late 61 283 Block so far I found out: Questing; why does no suffix appears on the engine? .It looks to me that there is no manipulation on that number and that the engine shoud be made in Flint doest,n it,because of the ,,F,, in the beginning?. Can it happend that the factory(Flint)reststamped it after the engine wassend in for decking/resurfacing the engine?Thats what somebody in enginebusiness told me

Thank you so much for your help& answer!
greeting Joerg

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Joerg,

Your Chevrolet engine with the casting number 3789935 is a 283 engine installed in various Chevrolet passenger cars and light trucks from 1956 through 1967. Near the end of 1961 production, the Corvette assembly plant was running low on 283 engines needed to finish out the 1961 production line. The 1962 Corvette line was to begin production with a 327 engine, so these available 283s was the solution to engine shortages in late 1961.

The engine number F07171787 means nothing. If the engine was assembled in Flint the engine number could be F07I7CQ (or another two-letter suffix code). Note that the "one" is shown in the date as a capital "I", not the number one. Just before the engine was installed in the chassis at the factory, it was stamped with part of the vehicle's serial number, as you indicated. I have been in both the Flint engine plant and the St. Louis assembly plant where I observed their assembly procedures.

It is possible that the partially built new engine was purchased through a Chevrolet dealer's parts department. Often those new engines were sold as a general replacement with a blank pad where one expects to find the engine number. I have seen cases where the Chevrolet dealer stamped their own code on the engine pad. Perhaps this is what happened with your engine.

If you send me the casting date from the rear of the block and I will try to figure out the details a little closer.

Good Luck, Noland Adams

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Greetings from the America. Your casting number 3789935 was used from about #9500 to the end of production in 61 only along with other G.M.Cars. Now the block stamping F is for flint 07 is The month of July and 17 is the date. ie The 17th of July. The last four numbers ( I have no idea) Since you have a 60 with a 61 engine the original engine is gone. The block also have the V.I.N. number stamped on the pad. Just enjoy the car. Thanks

Larry

**********

Hi,
 
I have a early 1960  # 690..it has a block cast of 3737739..were these blocks used on early 1960 vettes?
 
 thks Bill

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  The7739 Block was used through Very Early 59.  So it is incorrect for a 60.  Your car should have a 6519 block.  Your stamp pad either is blank or has a early assembly date.   Just enjoy the car. Thanks Larry

 

**********
I want to remove the body from the frame on my 61, where can i get a DVD or manual that shows the best way to to remove it and support it with out damage. A.J. Long

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

I am the wrong person to answer this question, because I host a body removal DVD, so I cannot reply without sounding like a commercial. Here goes anyway- send $36.00 check or money order to Noland Adams, PO Box 1134, El Dorado, CA 95623, and ask for DVD #3. This is a discounted price because I pay the postage. Or buy one from Corvette Central.

- Noland Adams

**********

How would I find out how many cars are exisitng prior to my vin number 20867s100442? Also locating the build sheets.
Thanks
Rick

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  To my knowledge there is no way to tell how many cars made in 62 even in existence today. However on the build sheet if you are a member of NCRS ( must be) and request the information, they may have it.  One of the items you should get is the dealer code, date shipped, etc. The cost for this service is $40.00. This information just came available.  Lets hope they can help you.  If not, and until G.M. finds more original data, with a lot of B.S.  Good Luck Thanks, Larry

**********
Gentlemen,
My 58 base engine is blowing oil out the oil filler cap and the crankcase vent tube, where do  I start?

Thanks again,

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi  It sounds to me like you need a total rebuild of the motor.  Take the car to a good motor rebuild shop and have them look at it.  Generally there is no quick fix  "ouch"  Good luck  Larry

 

**********

 


I have to remove the tachometer from my 1959 corvette for an overhaul. What is the best method to get that unit out of the dash? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Bob=

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi; Here is the procedure

1. Remove positive cable from battery and remove and tag for identification all panel lamps and electrical connections.
2. Remove mast jacket lower cover and cover support.
 
3. Remove pressure line from oil gauge and cable from speedometer and tachometer.
4. From under dash panel remove five screws retaining instrument panel
assembly to dash panel.
5. Lift out the complete unit and unbolt the tachometer.
Good luck Thanks Larry

**********

Hi,

You guys are great!

I just joined and already have another question.

I had my local Corvette club meeting this weekend but did not get real specific information.

I am restoring my '60 from the ground up.  I have disassembled the entire back end suspension and am trying to replace the differential gasket since it leaks pretty badly.  I think that I cannot get the differential apart to replace the gasket because I need to remove the rear axles.

I have read the service manual and other manuals, but I guess I am not smart enough or experienced enough to comprehend how to remove the rear axles to get the front of the differential off to replace the gasket.

Am I correct that I need to remove the axles, and if so how can I do this?

I hope you guys don't get tired of me too quickly.

Thanks very much,

Tom Richards

From Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  In the Corvette Servicing guide on pages 4-7 through 4-17 is the complete instructions of how to take the rear axle apart.  It will show pictures and detailed instruction of how to complete this task.  Buy one of these books and follow the procedure.  You will also need some special tools.  Good Luck Thanks Larry

**********

I just got a 57 and was told that the 58-62 steering column would bolt right in and that they are 2 inches shorter that the 53-57. This would give me some additional room and be more comfortable for me, I want to drive it. Is this correct? 
Thanks, Jim

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  
Jim,
Yes, your information is correct. Enjoy your '57!
-Noland Adams

 

 

 

 

**********
Is there a good way to refurbish the leaf spring on a '60, or do I need to bite the bullet and buy new ones?

Thanks,

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Tom,

  The rear leaf spring assemblies on 1953 to 1962 Corvettes are rebuildable. Just about every medium sized city has a company that rebuilds them. The spring assembly is taken apart, and the individual spring leaves are examined. Each leaf must have the correct shape (curve). In a process that I have not observed (brute force, maybe) the leaf is returned to its original arc. Then the leaves are heat treated to retain their shape and reassembled into the spring assembly. Special liners are installed between the springs to provide a smooth action. The spring shop will install a generic spring liner if you do not locate a replacement that looks like the original type of liner.

  Most spring repair shops are unable to furnish the correct exterior clamp. The clamp is a piece of steel bent around the leaves to keep them in alignment. Take photographs or make a drawing showing where each clamp is located and if the opening is up or down. Remove the clamp and keep it for replacement later, but use caution because it may require heating the clamp for removal and installation.

  Now that your rear leaf springs are rebuilt, paint them as needed (probably black). With original type of liners between the leaves, and the original clamp in place, I defy anyone to know that they’ve been rebuilt.

  By rebuilding your springs, you’ve also retained the dates they were built. Oh, yes, they are dated, and sometimes that’s an important factor in keeping the car original.

  As an aside, Delco makes a low pressure gas shock especially for 1953 to 1962 Corvettes. Several major brands also make gas filled shocks to fit 1962 and older Corvettes, but they contain too much pressure; your Corvette will sit higher and literally “ride like a truck”. Best of all, the Delco shocks are a lot cheaper. Any Delco dealer should have them.

  Enjoy your ’60!

  -Noland Adams

**********
I JUST REBUILT MY STEERING BOX AND IT SEEMS FINDING ANYONE WHO KNOWS WHAT TO FILL IT WITH IS QUITE A CHALLANGE. THE SERVICE MANUAL LISTS STEERING BOX LUBE WITH NO SPECS AS TO THE WEIGHT OR TYPE.I'M SURE SOMEONE HAS ASKED THIS QUESTION BEFORE BUT IF YOU CAN FIND A MINUTE TO ANSWER THIS IT WILL BE OF GREAT HELP. EVERYONE AT THE PARTS HOUSES,INCLUDING SUMMIT RACING IN AKRON SAY "THE BOOKS DON'T GO BACK THAT FAR",AND I CALLED LUCAS WHO MAKES A VARIETY OF LUBRICANTS FOR AUTOS AND THEY COULD NOT ANSWER THE QUESTION EITHER..THANKS FOR THE HELP---RON

From:  Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Ron,

  The recommended steering box lubricant is medium weight gear oil, 30 to 50 weight. However, this will not work (poor lubrication) because it leaks out through the side cover gasket. The original gasket was very thin, and the mating surfaces were not perfect, so most 1953 to 1962 steering boxes leak. Buy a piece of gasket material about 1/16 inch thick (or more) and use a ball pein hammer to “cut” the gasket. With the new, thicker gasket installed, you can now use medium weight gear oil which will not leak. Do not use 90 weight gear oil, because it may not provide sufficient lubrication during cool weather.

Also, be advised that there may be other solutions to this problem as well.

  Cheers,

  Noland Adams

**********

Last night, when I went to put my trunk key into the trunk lock cylinder to open the trunk, the key felt like it does not want to go in all the way. Of course, the key will not turn to the right as (I believe) it is not "seated" all the way in, so it won't pop the mechanism.  There is nothing that I know of inside the lock and the key is not broken off (it's still in one piece). I tried some WD40 in there as well, but it feels nice and loose and will turn easily, it's just that the cylinder is malfunctioning and not allowing the key to enter all the way (I think).

 Is there a secret to "picking" the lock or getting the lock cyulinder out of the trunk without mangling the trunk area?  This car is a Duntov Award/Bloomington Gold car, so I am naturally beside myself with trying to get the trunk open without going crazy on it.

 Thanks in advance fo rany help out there!

 Bob Amon

From: Larry Richter, Foundign Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi;  If the key will not go in all the way you have a key-way obstruction.. Or part of the tumblers got out of alignment.  The lock in and of its self my be junk. You might try a very good lock smith, but be careful.
What you may end up doing is to drill out the emblem remove the back nuts and then you can turn the rod ( latch) and open the trunk. This way you can save the ring on the outside.  The lock may need to be replaced and for sure the emblem.  You are not the first one that has had this problem.  Good luck Larry


**********

I would like to change my 61's front wheel bearings to taper roller bearings. Do you have any bearing numbers or usage info, like are they  63 vette items? Thanks: Jack Flessner member 3232.

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  
Jack,

  The 1953 to 1962 front wheel tapered roller bearings are replacements for the original ball bearings. They are not interchangeable with the 1963 and later tapered roller bearings. I would try your local Corvette parts supplier or Corvette Central. If that doesn’t work, try a local source, Corvette Stop here in northern California . Their phone number is 530) 677-4270. This will improve your ‘61’s handling a lot!

-Noland Adams

**********

I have a 62 with a block no of F1121RD which would indicate a
327/300HP. The intake is numbered 3844459 which is a 63 number for a
 327/300HP. I have owned the car for 30 years now and finally in a
 
position to start a restoration. Several places on the internet have 
an aluminum manifold for the 327/300 in 62? I have also talked to 
 several other Corvette owners at local shows, and they say that may be
 
a possibility due to the late (Nov.) build date. What is the correct 
number to look for and where might I search for the manifold? Thanks 
in advance.

 Rick
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC: 

Hi; All 62 300 hp intake manifold were Cast, not aluminum. All the judging manuals state that it should cast. In NCRS Judging since is what we havegone by for many years, I believe that is correct. The correct number is 3799349. The sellers that have the aluminum intake ones for the 62, are just trying to sell you a part. You could always paint the manifold and a non judge would never know. Good Luck Larry

**********

Looking for info re; identify part ??

the part is connected to one side of the amp gauge , waxy cardboard looking  about the size of a index finger with another wire connector on the other end ?  part number I find looks like 72705682 , mine is not connected , probably has been there forever /  not sure what to call it , resister or filter of some kind ,

thanks for any help ,

Dave/MN

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi  The capacitor that goes on the ammeter battery lead, just goes to ground.  It is installed for the radio background noise.  The number is 7270568.  Make sure the capacitor is good before attaching it to ground,   Good Luck.  Larry



**********
I have a 62 with the 327 340 HP engine. I've had an ongoing problem with overheating. I changed the thermostat, pulled the radiator and had it checked and replaced all the hoses.

Any thoughts?  Thanks.
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi;  This problem could be several items or part of several items
1.  Check the timing on the engine.  It may be either too far advanced or not enough
2.  Make sure that the air is going through the radiator and not around the sides of the radiator
3   You way want to have the engine boiled out
4.  Have a leak down test on the engine when it is hot. It may have a head or block that is opening up under heat.
5.  Take it to a shop that can do a complete scope and generally something will show up.
      It may just take some time to find the problem.   Good Luck  Thanks Larry

**********
Dear Sirs:
My memory is shot, and it's tough getting old, but am I correct, in thinking that I can drop the steering column, on my 1961 Corvette, out though the bottom of the car, while it's up on jacks?
Sure seems like I did this back in the 70's, and the box needs going through again.
Thanks,
Jim
Member #3311

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Jim,

  The steering column on a 1961 Corvette can be removed by rotating it and lowering it out of the chassis. I don’t think the jacks will make a difference, except it might make it easier.

  Later,
Noland Adams

**********
hi. I am not a member. but i have a question. i am trying to remove the speedometer cluster from a1961 corvette.ihave removed thetwo screws and the nut  from the cluster under the dash. but do not seem to have a lot of wiggle room to remove the speedometer from under the dash to replace the speedo needle. any help would be appreciated. also would like to have a membership application. thank you

From: Ken Amrick, Editor, On Solid Ground, and East Region Representative:  

I'm not aware that you can remove the speedometer from the dash without first removing the instrument cluster.  There is an article on tips for removing the instrument cluster in the Spring 2005 issue of our club magazine.  Back issues of the magazine when available can be purchased from the editor for $6.00 each. 
Because is is so difficult for most of us to fit under the dash to remove the attachment nuts, most of us remove the steering wheel and the seat assembly before starting on the instrument panel.  Some of the attaching nuts are located way back in the area where the windshield end post is attached to the body.  You will need a 1/4 inch drive with a swivel adapter to remove them. (I think there are 2 in this area if I remember correctly.)  It's not a difficult job, but it's not a pleasent one either.  It is hard on the back and a time consuming job.  Be sure to pad the steering column when sliding the instrument cluster out to keep it from getting scratched up.  Ken


**********
Where might I ind a accurate 1960 Corvette Radio Ground Strap Kit Diagram and description of each ground strap.
Thank You
Leland # 2768
From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Purchase an original assembly manual for your 1960 from either Corvette Central, Mid America or NCRS.  In it you will find diagrams showing where each ground strap is located.

 

 

 

**********

I have a 62 Corvette with non-matching number engine and transmission and I am not sure about the differential. I am ordering a transmission from Eddie Wass to match the car.  He asked if I wanted a close ratio or wide ratio transmission.  I am not sure what to tell him. I plan to find the correct block to put in a 300 hp engine.  I have most of the parts gathered up for that, except for an 870 bock dated late May or early June (I actually have two 870 blocks, neither have the correct dates though).  I believe the build date for my car was around July 6th 1962.

  I looked at the differential and the only things I saw on it are the numbers 3725899 and an E-157. Since I have the money saved for the transmission, I want to change that out first.  Do I tell him to build a close ratio or wide ratio transmission? If you need my VIN it is 20867S113613.

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

David,

  Your 1962 Corvette with a 300 HP engine was originally equipped with a wide ratio four speed manual transmission. The close ratio transmission was for the higher horsepower 340 and 360 engines. The intent was to keep the engine revolutions up when shifting between second, third, and fourth while racing.

  A Corvette driven on the street is much easier to drive with a wide ratio transmission. With a close ratio transmission, it will seem like you are always be starting in second gear. Even if it had a close ratio originally, I would recommend a wide ratio for normal street driving.

  Good luck with your ’62.

  Cheers, Noland Adams

**********

top will not go down enough i have to force lid down tight on corners on my 1959 corvette. what is the problem.  thanks dave.

Hi;  If you were able to latch the top in prior years, then it could be.
1- If you left the top down for any length of time the material shrinks, so set in the in sun for a day or two and it should come back.  Never leave your top down for any length of time. ( I put mine up and latch it every night.)
2 - Something has moved in your frame work. You may be able to tell at the attachment bolts on each side behind the seat.  You may need to call around to find a shop that understands an early Corvette top and have them adjust it.
3-  The front latches have moved.  It should fit tight against the windshield but these can be adjusted.
4-  The top pads are pinched in the frame work.  These belong on the top of the frame when the top is up
5 - If the top is very hard to latch, there is a good chance that you will pull the windshield out of the frame and this requires the windshield frame to come off.  OUCH. This is a project.
6 - The rivets in the frame may be loose and causing the frame to move around.  This will cause the frame to be rebuilt and new canvas put on.
 
If it is a new top take it back to the upholstery shop.  What happened is the top frame was not fit to the car before the canvas was attached.  They may need to get new canvas and start over. Very few upholstery shops know how to put on any convertible top.
 
Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

**********
I have seen Inca Silver 58’s with Black and also White side coves, which is the correct color ? I believe it is Black but is it possible that late 58’s could have had White coves like the 59’s did ?

Thanks
Mike

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:  

Hi:  Silver was not a color on the early (first series) of the 58.  Silver was on the later 58's and the cove color was black.  Hope this helps.  Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

I  own 59 corvete serial #  J59 S100146
I AM TOLD IT WAS BUILT  SEPT 11 1958 THE CAR HAS A 350 IN IT AND I  FOUND
THE ORIGINAL CARBS 270 HORSE AND THE DISTRIBUTOR

WHEN I BOUGHT THE CAR IN 1976 IT HAD A 283 2 BARREL
I NOW WANT TO BUILD UP THE CORRECT ENGINE THE TACH HAS A 6500 RPM  REDLINE
AND WHEN I PURCHASED IT IN 1976 THEY GAVE ME THE CORRECT MANIFOLD  IT WAS IN
THE TRUNK I  BELIEVE IT IS A 270 HORSE ORIGINALLY SINCE IT HAS  THE 6500
RPM REDLINE NOT A FEULIE

I  FOUND A 3756519 BLOCK BUT IT SAYS SEPT 58 SO THAT WON'T DO SO HOW  FAR
BACK CAN I GO AS FAR AS A CASTING DATE TO HAVE THE CORRECT ENGINE  SHOULD I
GO BACK 2 OR 3 MONTHS

THEY SAY THEY CAN RE STAMP IT AS A CU AND GET ME ON MY WAY BUT I WAS
CURIOUS HOW FAR BACK I COULD GO I'M LOOKING EVERYWHERE AND I DO WANT TO MAKE
THIS CORRECT SO I CAN GIVE IT TO MY CHILDREN ONE  DAY.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  Your car was a very early 59.  Now if the engine was assembled ( on the 
front right block pad) in Sept 58, or cast ( back of the block on the 
flywheel flange) and put into the car on or about the11th, it is almost 
impossible.  10 total days from final assembly in flint to placement in the 
car in St. Louis?  You really need a engine cast and assembled in mid August 
of 58 ( or before) to have it in your car.  You really need a 3737739 block, 
The 519 block may work as this was the change over in early 59 as long as it 
is a Aug cast date.
At NCRS most re-stamps are detected, as we read the broach marks and the 
stamp in and of itself. However some of the re-stampers and doing a better 
job. You need to obtain the original parts and have them rebuilt, as most 
reproductions have differences.
Just keep looking for a good block as one will come along.
On your tach the yellow line should start at 6,000 and go to 6,300 and then 
red from the 6,300 to 6,500.
 Keep enjoying the car and have fun.  Thanks Larry


**********

Hi gentlemen, I am looking for seat belts for my 1958. Any recommendations, how can I be sure that I am buying correct material color and hardware?
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:
Hi: 1958 Seat Belts are all the same. They are a gray four-web weave material with the potmetal handle painted in blue Hammertone. The Original belts had a chrome plated male end. It may or may not have "235" stamped on it. The belt with the female buckle had a Irving Air Chute tag attached with city and U.S. Patent # 2,458,810. Generally the originals have been found to have the female buckles in the outboard side. Comment: If you are not showing the car you may want to get close and save some money. Enjoy the car. Thanks Larry


**********

I'm looking for a pair of trunk spears for my 1958 Corvette. I would 
appreciate any suggestions on this subject. Thanks.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:
Hi:  The original trunk spears are hollow inside, therefore they are a lot 
lighter then the reproduction.  If you are looking at originals make sure 
they either have good chrome or can be re-chromed.  Not all shops can chrome 
them.  The reproductions are about half price of the originals or less and 
are solid.  What happens is the springs that hold the trunk up will not take 
the additional weight and you need a broom stick to hold up the trunk lid. 
The do make a kit to increase the tension on the springs that works well. 
Good luck and enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:
I see that Larry Richter has answered you, but I have some additional


information about reproduction trunk spears. There are at least four sources

 
for the reproductions. One company was located in 

Michigan

, but they stopped

 
making them, the last I heard. They had a quality problem, resulting in some

 
poor fitting pieces with a less than perfect exterior plating surface.

 
A more recent manufacturer was in 

Texas

. These reproductions were aluminum,

 
cast in 

Mexico

. The price was just a few hundred dollars, but the aluminum

 
was porous and it took a lot of work to prepare the surfaces for plating.


 
A machine shop located in 

Minnesota

 (as I recall) had a special guide made

 
for their computer guided milling machines. Because there are complex

 
compound curves, and the left is different from the right, a lot of

 
machining had to be done to a large aluminum billet. The result was an

 
expensive but perfect reproduction, ready for plating. The price for each

 
side was in the $1,300.00 to $1,400.00 range. Once again, this was for just

 one part.


 
Now that I think about it, I can't remember details about the fourth source

 
for '58 trunk spear reproductions. Maybe it was just three guys that made

 
them. They say the memory is one of the first senses to go. I'll miss my

 
memory- I wonder where I left it.


 
Good Luck, Noland Adams

**********
I'M WORKING ON A 1960 CORVETTE TRYING TO FIT THE DOORS ,THE PROBLEM IS THE PASSENGER DOOR MAKES STRANGE CREAKING NOISES AND I CAN'T SEEM TO FIND THE CAUSE.I HAVE REPLACED THE HINGES AND THE NEW ONES MAKE THE SAME NOISE.WHEN OPERATING THE HINGES WITHOUT THE DOOR ON THERE IS NO NOISE BUT AFTER INSTALLING THE DOOR THE NOISE RETURNS.I HAVE TRIED SHIMS IN DIFFERENT PLACES WITH NO LUCK,SO I'M AT A LOSS AS TO THE REASON FOR THE CREAKING NOISES.  THE DRIVES DOOR WORKS GREAT WITH NO NOISE...THANK YOU FOR ANY HELP WITH THIS MYSTERY---RON

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Ron,

The only part that could make noises when one of the doors is moved is the hinge pins and bushings. The pin in each hinge has two bushings. First, I would try soaking the hinge pins and bushings with a penetrating oil. If the noise prevails, it is possible the pins and bushings are worn, but this usually happens to the driver’s door. You can purchase pin and bushing kits at Corvette Central or other reliable parts sources.   Good luck,

  Noland Adams


**********
Does anyone have experience with a Mallory 4264511 distributor as a replacement for an OEM unit in a C1.  This distributor has Corvette tach drive, magnetic breaker, vacuum and mechanical advance and wires up to the stock ballast resistor and a stock or high-output coil. (NOT a coil-in-cap HEI). The engine currently in my 62 is a Gen 1 350 with a dual point distributor and mechanical advance only a la 62 327/340 distributor.  Mechanical advance only isn't the greatest set up for street driving especially with an L46 cam(350/350) and a 3.55 rear so I am looking to make a change. 

Thanks for any input.

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Hal,

I’ve been watching your progress on getting the ’62 restored. I just wanted to wish to well, although I can’t help you on this distributor problem.

  Cheers,       Noland Adams

**********

First, you guys are great!  I'm sending in my membership this week.  I have another question on the windshield install of my '61.  It is in the shop and they tell me the lower channel is bent.  I am sceptical as everything looked great when the assy came off the car, and fit good when reinstalled six months ago.  I took it in because the gasket across the top had pulled out and got rolled under the top of the windshield exposing the outer edge of the windshield (probably from a too tight top install).  the car has never been hit near the windshild.  Have you ever heard of this phenomena and how would that affect fit across the entire top edge of the assy?
 
Thanks for being there for us.

From: Max Brockhouse, President of SACC:  
I bet the corners of your windshield tabs are broken off.  This will cause the weather strip to have a gap.  Send them to Corvette Central to have them rebuilt.  Glass installers back in the day would not remove the windshields, just pry them back to allow room to replace the glass and after 50 years of a soft top pulling back on the frame, they break.

 



**********

I am replacing a six cylinder Blue Flame engine back into a 1954 that had a V8 installed and need to find a repair manual or some kind of literature/diagram/photos that shows how this is done regarding placement of all parts, lines, wires, etc.  Can you recommend any sources?

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

Roger,

  There weren’t many repair manuals for Corvettes before 1956. The best reference is the book I wrote on 1953 to 1962 Corvette Restoration, which covers six cylinder Corvette engines in detail.

  Therefore this is a shameless advertisement for my book. It is available from me, Noland Adams, PO Box 1134 , El Dorado , CA 95623 . The book lists for $79.95, but I can offer it for $70.00 plus $5.00 shipping and handling. Send me a check or money order for $75.00; be sure to include any special message to go along with my autograph.

  Good Luck,

  Noland Adams

**********

Can you tell me what the standard shop time to replace a windshield in my 1961 Corvette should take?  (ie: what was the standard shop rate time expected from removal of the assy, replacement of the glass, to reinstallation in the car.

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  A standard shop should not be considered.  Best go to a Corvette shop that works on early Corvettes.  The window frame will have to be removed and is held down by a bolt about every 7 or 8 inches that is access under the padded dash.  If you are handy, best do it yourself as it will take most of a day.

 


From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi: Here on the west coast they allow between 5 & 7 hours at about $50 to $70 per hour.  On the early cars you must get under the dash to remove the windshield.  You can save a bunch if you remove the windshield with the frame ( they come off together). Be very careful of the bolts on the back corners as the are difficult to get out without breaking them off.  They can be brazed back on by a expert in welding.  Once that is complete you can remove the bright work around the glass.  Now is a good time to have it polished and any dents removed.  Try to find a shop that has changed a early Corvettes windshield before, or you may have problems that you never dreamed could happen.
You need a expert to re-install the glass in the rubber and get it to fit into the bright work channel and back on the car.   You need to check the top after replacing the windshield in the car to make sure your top fits as it should and check the door fit.   Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry


**********
Hello

I have a 1958 Roadster (Have owned it for 41 years now) I just got it back from restoration / paint folks. Putting back together. During the restoration, a new interior, including dashpad was installed. My problem: Brake lights work fine, as does turn signals. However, when I pull headlight switch out, even at parklight position, the brakelight rear light fuse  (10 Amp) blows. Headlights continue to burn. Could my problem be in the rear taillight housing, even if the brake and turn signal side still works? Any insight you can give me will be greatly appreciated.  Also, I am very interested in joining the solid axle Club.

Many Thanks

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:

My guess is a grounding problem in the left rear taillight area. I would buy a bucket of fuses and try removing hot wires until the problem goes away. Then you have the faulty source surrounded. Another problem area might be the turn signal switch just under the steering wheel. If I had a 1958 to 1960 Corvette available, I might be able to duplicate the problem and thus provide a solution. Since I have never experienced this personally, I can only offer a thoughtful guess about the cure.

 

Good Luck, Noland Adams

                        SACC # 1 

Note from web editor:  If you would like to speak to Noland personally, he will be at our convention this summer.  Click on
'2010 Convention' for details.  To join SACC, it is easy, just click on 'OUR MEMBERSHIP' and print the application form.  Send it in.  Easy as that.  Hope you join us!
Jack "Doc" Hollada

**********

Can you tell me if there is a site I can go to that will give me the bolt

torque for a quick steering adapter and the proper installation

illustration?

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi : I have researched your question on the Quick steering and do not have an answer on the installation or the bolt torque. The best I can do is Section 9 in the Corvette Service Guide it gives the torque for the factory steering assembly ( page 9-10 & 9-11) This may be some help. Also perhaps Corvette Central would have some information. Good Luck Thanks Larry

From Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

In 1958 I had a 1957 Corvette with a 270 engine and a 3 speed close ratio transmission. I bought a quick steering adapter over the Chevy parts counter. That's been over 50 years ago, but it didn't come with installation instructions at all, as I recall. It was obvious that the tapered studs went into the tapered holes. The method we used was to tighten them as tight as we could. If the bolt or stud broke off, we backed it off half a turn.

Good Luck,

Noland Adams

SACC # 1



**********

Which other vehicle rear end housing will fit a 1959 Corvette without major modification?

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:
Any full size 1953 Chevy sedan.  In 1960 the Corvette rear end was changed.

 

 


**********

How do I remove the manual window regulator assembly on driver side?

Thank you,
Tom Richards

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of Sacc:

Hi: You need to remove the two screws holding on the arm rest assembly.  Then remove the handles and window cranks, You will need to remove the horseshoe clips holding them on from behind ( careful not to slice you door panel). Unscrew the locking knob. If you do not have the correct tool go buy

one. ( about 3 or 4 dollars) Remove all the screws holding on the panel.  Pull out from the bottom with your hands and lift up to remove.  Next remove the end molding on the top of the door and the outside top molding ( screws are on the inside) Do the same with the inside molding.  Remove the inspection plate ( big one bottom back and almost square) Thenput the window crank back on ( no clips required) and run the window up or  down until the sash retaining screws are visible ( one will be visible on the top front of the large inspection plate and the other one in the round  inspection hole about 8 or 10 inches forward from the inspection plate.  Remove these two screws.  You may need to pry up on the bottom channel to make the window loose.  The carefully remove the glass ( bottom channel still attached from the top  of the door.) Have some help and do not drop.  Remove the screws retaining the regulator and then from the car. Make sure you have the correct replacement before you put the old one in the garbage. Comments: Be sure to mark everything so you window will fit back in the same as it came out. Grease everything so it will work correctly especially the guide's and gear. Before you install the door panel make sure everything works correctly and the fit is correct.

Good Luck and enjoy the car. Thanks Larry

**********

Hello,
There are three set type screws at the pinion area of the diff. Is there a torque spec on these screws or is there a specific tightening instruction?

From: Larry Richter, founding treasurer of SACC:

Hi: The Corvette Service Guide states the following. Under Pinion Assembly
 #5.  Install three tapered lock screws and draw them down evenly and tightly, then tighten lock screw nuts.
 Note.  A statement in general states  " All bolts should be tightened to 40-60 Ft. Pounds."
If you need more data let me know your fax number and I will fax you several pages of the
manual    Thanks and enjoy the car.  Larry

**********

Gentlemen,

 Two Questions:

1. I have a posi rear end in my 1960 fuelie. I need to add some posi fluid. The person that restored my corvette stated not use new synthetic posi fluid but the "whale fat" posi fluid that the car was  manufactured with. Is this true? If so, where do I go to purchase this  type of "natural" posi fluid?

 2. Car has sat in my garage from late summer until now. When I parked the car for winter, everything worked  great. However, I started the car today and when the clutch is  depressed, it will not shift into gear. What is the possible problem  and solution? Thanks For the help. I'm stationed out here at Beaufort SC and there is not a "go to" place for classic corvettes in the area

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi; I would use the original type of oil with the additive in you possiunit. The problem is that the new synthetic type makes the clutches veryslick and may not work correctly. The newer units are built for thesynthetic fluid. G.M. dealerships should be able to get the product. If

not try the better parts stores.  On your second question. Is the clutch releasing so the transmission can go in to gear? If it is not rock the car in gear with the clutch depressed as the clutch is stuck. You may even try to turn the engine over with the battery in gear with the clutch pushed in. Be sure your battery is of full charge. If this does not work and the car is so you can start it in gear you may try to drive the car with the clutch pushed in, and hit the brake pedal hard, maybe several times. Be very careful and ready to turn the engine off if something happens. Perhaps have some one ride with you with the their hand on the key. Again be very careful. If the problem is not in the clutch then it is either a transmission linkage problem or an internal transmission problem.Please contact us if the above does not work. Good luck and enjoy the car.

Larry

**********
I just last week, joined SACC and thought I'd run a question by your tech "experts".
I've had my 1961 Corvette since the mid 70's.
It is a "correct" 270 HP car, and we drive the "pants off of it"!
During a recent tune-up attempt, I became extremely frustrated trying to obtaining a "set" of dual points that I could get proper dwell.  Several trips to NAPA and returning junk; even bent rotors.
At any rate, I deceided to purchase an Ignitor from Pertronix.
After a complete tune up, including plugs and adjusting the lifters, etc, I attemped to time the car.
I brought the mark to 12 degrees advance as I alway do, but it would barely idle.
After adjusting the idle, I took it for a ride and "no power" - extremely retarded!
I then timed it by ear, taking the timing mark past 12 degees and up to about 1:00 PM on the balancer; took it for a ride and it goes "like stink"!
I crawled under the car, took off the bottom pulley to check the balancer.
It was still "all lined up" with the key way, and not slipping within its rubber.
Emailed Pertronix and the tech person said my distributor needs stronger mechanical advance springs; that there is no resistance with the Ignitor but some resistance with the old dual points.
Put the light on the car again and reved up the motor and the mark stays at the same place, 2:00 PM - -   So "no advance"??!!
Ever heard of this?  Are they correct; I need my distributor checked for stronger mechanical advance springs?
Thanks for your input and help!
Jim
From:  Bill Herron, SACC Treasurer:  

Hi Jim,
 
I've had a Pertronix unit on my 57 since 1999.  I replaced the dual points and condenser with the (then latest) unit and basically did nothing else but drive the stink outta the car (just like you).  The only problem I had dealt with using the shorter "points" attaching screw when installing the distributor module; the screw loosened up after a multi-lap jaunt around Atlanta Motor Speedway (at substantially higher than legal speeds, I might add ~130mph!) and temporarily stranded me on I-75 at downtown Atlanta that evening.  I was able to diagnose the problem, replace the short screw with the longer "condenser" screw and have not looked under the distributor cap since.  I still keep the dual points, condenser (and short screw) in the trunk just in case!  Without referring to my records I am confident that I've put 25k+ miles on the car in the meantime, including trips to CA, MI, KY and IL all from FL and back.
 
In a nutshell, I haven't had problem one with my unit.  I did remove my distributor and had it checked on an old Sun distributor machine - it was in good working order.  Maybe you can find an "old school" shop in your vicinity that still has a Sun machine (and someone who can operate it)!  I hope this helps...
 

**********
Can someone tell me the thread size of a stock '57 corvette 4-speed shifter knob? Thanks, Ron.
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  The thread size is 5/16 -18  Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

 

 

**********


I need a vin plate for my 57 vette. It was lost when  it was painted. I have the title and have owned the car for 25 years. can you help, or tell where I can get one.  Cal
From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:  

I'm sure you are a very honest person with honorable intentions. Unfortunately, there are some not so honest people out there. And because of them, there are several people/companies who reproduce "cowl" and "trim" tags, but no longer produce VIN tags.

Over the years, I've discussed this with a few of them and all were very explicit about this point: if they make a VIN tag, and even if unknown to them it is used to disguise a stolen car, or defraud a customer about a car's true history, if discovered, they could be charged as an accessory.

I'm sure there is someone who provides this service, but sorry, I don't know who they are. However, if you search the internet long enough and follow-up with phone calls, you'll probably succeed in your search.

 

 

 

**********

I'm not a member, but I do have a ' 61 Vette that I'm trying to positvely identify the engine. The car is supposed to be a real F.I. car, and from all the published "signs" to look for it's the real deal. The engine nubers are as follows:
 
Casting #s at the rear of the block are 3756519----D99
Stamped #s on the front are F414CS, no other #s (VIN) are present.
 
The VIN on the car indicates it was built mid November 1960. From the research I've done, the block is the correct type but doesn't seem to be the correct year. Any help you can furnish will be greatly appreciated.
 
                                                                                                  Thanks in advance

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC: 

Don,
 
The CS engine is a fuel injected engine with mechanical lifters. I would check the left inner fender panel to see if there are holes which held brackets around the large air inlet hose to the air cleaner. You didn't provide your serial number, but you stated it was built in mid-November 1960, which means it is a 1961 with a serial number about 102500.
 
Your engine's assembly date is F414CS. The "F" means it was assembled at the Flint engine plant, and "414" means it was assembled on March 14th.
 
Now we go to the engine casting number 3758519 and the casting date code D99. The 519 block was used from 1959 through 1961. The date D99 means April 9, 1959.
 
In building a production calender, we have:
 
519 block, cast D99- April 9, 1959
engine assembly date F414CS- April 14, 1959
Your '61's build date- mid-November 1960
 
I have watched the production and assembly of engines and Corvettes at the Grey Iron Foundry in Saginaw, The Flint V8 engine plant, and the Corvette assembly line in St. Louis. There are two factors in identifying your engine. First, about one and one-half years elapsed between the time the engine was built and your '61 was built. The other is the lack of a serial number on the front engine pad. That means the engine was built at Flint, but was never shipped to the St. Louis Corvette plant. Instead, it was shipped as a long block to a Chevrolet dealer who ordered it as a special order. Long  blocks come complete with heads, valve covers, and oil pan. I'm guessing now- sometime in 1961 the owner of your '61 was looking for a replacement engine. The parts department of a dealer just happened to have an older long block available, and it was purchased and installed in your '61.
 
I am reasonably sure this is what happened in this case. Be aware that because it has a high hp mechanical lifter fuel injected engine in it now, that does not help to identify the original engine.
 
Good Luck,
 
Noland Adams

*Note from Doc Hollada, Website Editor:  Don, hopefully you will click on to "Our Membership" and download the membership form, a pdf file.  Send in your dues and the membership form, then join us at Bowling Green this summer and converse with Noland in person.


**********
I have a '58 car and I can see the crescent shaped arm bent and the pin hinge for the crescent arm coming half way out as the trunk lid closes.  This causes the trunk lid on the left side does not go all the way down, causing a bad fit.

Can a body shop change parts of the hinge tower with removing the body rivets for the hinge tower?
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  First remove the trunk divider board and examine both hinges and towers. You may have a problem on both sides.  A good shop may be able to bend the part and or parts back to the original shape.  If excess wear is apparent replace the part or parts.  If you have reproduction trunk irons you may want to put the after market springs in to hold the trunk lid up.   These are a lot heavier than the original.  ( if the irons are hollow brass they are the original type). If solid they are reproduction.  There is a small amount of adjustment through the shims that can be made on the trunk lid.   Thanks and enjoy the car.  Larry

**********

I just sent in my dues to rejoin after a long time.  The serial number on my car is 20867S10809.  My car is on the final stages of restoration and I'm down to having the hardtop restored.  Here's my question.
 
What is the correct color for the headliner in a 1962 Corvette?
 
In one of the Corvette books I thought I saw a description of the top for 62 having a white headliner and a black headliner for the 61 model year.  I have two hardtops for my car.  (one for restoration and one for parts)  The nicer of the two has the black headliner.  I haven't been able to locate that information again and need to know which is correct for my car before I get the hardtop restoration started.  Although my car will be a driver I'm doing everything my budget can tolerate to make it as correct as possible.
 
Do you know which Corvette book had this info in it?
 
Thanks in advance,

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  All 62 Corvettes had a white headliner in the hardtop.  From the front their are two one inch heat seams ( inch apart center to center) going across the car. ( door to door) then a two inch gap and most of the top are the one inch heat seams going front to back.  The same heat seams pattern is on your door panels.  Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice-President: 
Of the 14,531 Corvettes produced for 1962, 11,256 were equipped with the RPO 419, hardtop. 8,074 were manufactured with both softtop and auxiliary hardtop, while 3,179 came with hardtop only.

The '56 thru '60 Corvette hardtop headliners matched the color and pattern of the car's vinyl interior. However that changed in 1961...

Although not offered as an interior color for either '61 or '62, I believe the only color offered for both years for headliner was "white".

Hope this helps.

 

 


**********

I have a problem on my 1962 Corvette in that the engine cooling fan blades are very low in the radiator shroud, so low that the tips only clears at the bottom of the shroud by 3/8”.  The shroud is stock and the fan is a stock 17” diameter.  All of the rubber engine mounts are in place, both at the engine and the transmission.  The transmission mount, at the cross member, has one shim on each side of the cross member spacing the transmission downward.  This is a low mileage Corvette that does not appear to ever been wrecked and all of the previous owners do not report any damage history.

  I cannot see any way to raise the front of the engine at the mount except to shim under the rubber engine mounts with washers.  But to shim here would take over an inch to come close to raising and centering the blades in the shroud.  To lower the transmission, which would raise the fan, would take even more shimming than the front mounts.  This could cause a driveline angle problem.  I have tried to find out what the driveline angle should be but there is nothing on this subject, can you also let me know what the angle range should be at the drive shaft and the engine?  Where all front top rubber mounts the same thickness?

  If needed, I would be glad to give you a call to discuss.

  Thank you for any help on this problem,

  Jack  

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  The fan is not centered within the fan shroud.  The specks call for the following about 3/8 to 7/16 of a inch on the bottom and about 1 and 1/2 inch on the top.  It should have about 1 inch at the 90 and 270 degree on the sides, with a stock 17inch fan and stock shroud.   You fan appears to be right where it should be.  You do not want to raise the front of the motor for a lot of reasons.  Go have fun  Thanks Larry


**********

 I AM DOING A 1960 VETTE AND NEED INFORMATION ON REPLACING THE WINDSHIELD RUBBER . I HAVE THE WINDSHIELD OUT AND THE NEW RUBBER GASKET,BUT THE METHOD OF INSTALLING IT IS NOT AS EASY AS THE SERVICE MANUAL MAKES IT SOUND. IF YOU CAN SHED ANY LIGHT ON THE INSTALLATION PROCEDURE IT WOULD BE A GREAT HELP.
I TRIED LUBRICATION ON THE RUBBER TO GET THE LOWER CHANNEL AND TRIM ON WITH NO LUCK AND DON'T WANT TO BREAK THE ORIG GLASS TRYING.....
Hi:  I have helped on several of these and all have needed an expert.   My very strong advice is to take it to someone that knows how to set it in the frame correctly.  You can have all kinds of problems if this is not correct.  Most common are leaks, top not fitting correctly, windows not going to the full height and on and on.  Good Luck  Thanks Larry

 


**********

I have a completely reconditioned 1960 Horizon Blue 290 HP Fuel Injected Corvette with a Frost Blue Interior I have owned for 41 years this coming January.

I recently attended the FL NCRS Chapter Judging event a Howey-In-The Hills Fl.  During the judging there were several thing that the judges mentioned that

I needed to correct before the January NCRS Judging Event that is held at Old Town in Kissimmee Fl.  One was that I need to install several screws in the carpet, the other one was that I needed to find and install the correct capacitors with the correct numbers.  MY first question is, where are these screws located

In the carpet (a picture would be nice) and my second question is what are the numbers on these three capacitors and where would be a good place to order them?

  I met Mr. Adams at the opening of the Corvette Museum in 1994.  He was kind enough that day to sigh my Corvette Restoration Book Vol. 1.  As I mentioned above

I have owned my 60 Fuelie for 41 years and it was completely reconditioned 2 ½ years ago and I have enjoyed driving it all over Florida . At the local car shows I spoke with several people that worked on the early Corvettes from the beginning.  I recently spoke with a man that worked with Mr. Duntov during the development and testing of the Fuel Injection System for the 57 Corvette.  He was a very interesting person to talk to.

  Anyway, I hope you can help with my questions.  I thank you in advance for any info you can send.

  Thanks,

  Wayne    

Hi;  Sounds like a great car.  Your carpet screws are chrome plated ( not nickel or stainless) and are on the right side of the car toward the transmission about 1 to 1&1/2 inches in on the carpet and about the same from the top of the carpet and the bottom bend where it starts up. ( there is no exact spot.) on the left side only one is at the top about the same distance behind the go fast pedal.
`      The capacitor's are #7270568 (large yellow wax unit) attached at the ammeter gauge lead under the dash.  This is only on radio equipped cars.  A radio interference suppression one is located at the generator (#1911995) attaches to the generator terminal with the gray brown wire.  At the voltage regulator (#19427452) attaches to the lower terminal,  both of these have a metal exterior and about 1&1/4 inches long and about 5/8 of a inch in diameter.
       Good luck and have fun.  Thanks Larry 

**********
I have a 61 with a t-10 and am replacing the rubber transmission mount.  The Service Manual states to make sure the shims are replaced to ensure proper driveshaft alignment.  My car has no shims.  Is there a way to verify if the shims are required? 
Great tech website, BTW.
 
Ray 
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC: 

Hi:  The shims ( if present ) are between the crossmember and the frame.  They were installed on some of the Corvettes to align the drive shaft.   They are not required but make sure they were not present when you removed the cross member.
 
Good Luck  Thanks Larry

**********

I have a 1960 Corvette. The tail lights stopped working (both sides).

Stop lights and turn signals ok. It would be quite a coincidene for

both bulbs to fail at the sale time. Are the tail lights on a separate fuse?
Thank You,
From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi; All of the Rear Lights are on the same fuse.

You will need a simple ohm and volt unit to check this out. However

pull the rear

bulbs out and use some fine sand paper to clean both the bulb and the inside of the

housing. Make sure they are tight. Inspect the bulbs while they are out.

1. Steps. Check Ground ( not only on the back of the housing but inside the housing)

2. Check and see if you have power to the back of the bulb ( check with park lights on)

3. If the above checks out you may have a broken wire. ( first look in the trunk)

The wire that is broken may not be visible from the outside.

4. The wires go to the back on the drivers side. Remove the sill plate and check.

Somewhere in the above you will find the problem.

Good Luck Thanks Larry


**********

> Hello, I wish to change the carrier assembly gasket on a 1958

> Corvette due to a slow oil leak. I have disconnected the drive shaft

> and removed the nuts from the 10 bolts holding the carrier assembly,

> The assembly refuses to move from the differential. I am guessing that

> an axle or both axles will need to be removed. Any assistance that you

> can provide will be appreciated. Thank you.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi; Here are the steps to remove the Axles.

1. Take off both rear wheels and the brake drum

2. Install a clamp ( to hold in the wheel cylinder and brake shoes)

Remove the differential housing cover ( after draining the housing)

3. Remove the differential pinion shaft lock screw, ( in the housing) and the differential pinion

shaft, axle shaft spacer and differential pinions. ( these are in the center of the housing by the spider gears)

4. Push axle shafts in toward the center of the axle and remove the "C" washers from inner

ends of the axle shafts. ( you do not need to completely remove them.)

5. Pull the axles out

A couple of Notes

( Do not damage any part of the interior gears as then they will need replacing)

( If you have any oil evidence in the breaks you need to replace the outer bearings

and seals. You will need a bearing puller. Again do not damage any the internal Parts )

Good luck, Thanks Larry


**********

>I have a question about my 1962 Corvette. I recently acquired it from my

>uncle and all the numbers match according to the Black Book. I believe

>the car has been painted. My problem is I cannot find a body plate or any

>info on the original colors. It is currently white with black interior,

>but I am not sure it is the original color. The serial # is 20867S113884.

>Any info I really would appreciate.

> Thanks,

> Randy Mayfield
From: Noland Adams, founding president of SACC:

Randy,

You need to buy the Restoration Book I wrote on 1953 to 1962 Corvettes. It

costs about $80, but I sell it for $70.00 plus $4.00 shipping. Ok, no more

commercials.

Just after the start of 1958 Corvette production, the St. Louis Corvette

assembly plant started helping the painter by writing the exterior body

color in the trunk. They used a lumber crayon (usually green) to write the

color name on the vertical front trunk panel. In order to see this, you'll

have to remove the vertical cardboard panel, which will reveal a thin coat

of paint. To find the paint name, use the edge of a quarter under and beside

the right hand trunk lid hinge and tower. The paint is thin over the lumber

crayon, and it will flake off to show the body color. This procedure was

used on 1958 to 1960 Corvettes. Ivory means white, and Turq. is turquoise,

but red, black, and blue color names are obvious.

IN 1961 the placement of the color name changed to the passenger side seat

back. This was also used on the 1962 models. You'll have to remove the

passenger's seat, which is bolted in place. Then look at the seat back panel

which was behind the seat. Instead of being horizontal, it tilts back like

the seat back itself. The St. Louis workers opened the passenger's door and

stood outside the car while they wrote the color name in large letters on

the seat back panel. Again, a thin coat of paint covers the color name on

the panel. The edge of a quarter will locate the lumber crayon under the

paint. Just keep scraping until you find the entire name. If your car has a

hardtop, you might find "HT" there as well. Again, Ivory means white, MAR

means maroon, Fawn means fawn Beige, Etc.

If it was white, you'll find "Ivory" under the paint. The interior color was

not given- You'll have to look at the colored area in the interior. The

factory painted several small areas so that raw fiberglass could not be seen

around the seats.

For more information about our club, check out the Solid Axle Corvette Club

at http//www.solidaxle.org. This is a 1953 to 1962 group of owners who enjoy

their Corvettes and share technical information.

Enjoy your '62!

Cheers,

Noland Adams

**********

Hi. I just purchased a 'driver' quality 1960 vette after long years of wishing I hadn't sold my '59 in '71. I'm not unique in that. My intention is to bring it back to as close to original as I can. I will need to look for the right drive train as everything has been changed. I'm hoping you can help me establish the build date from the Vin number. It ends in 109156 which must be near the end of production for that year. That will help me to know what to look for. One of your answers to a similar question has already been helpful in determining that the tach red line suggests it was a 270 or 290 FI.
Is the location of the crossed flag insignia on the sides a further clue as to FI or not? In other words, did the factory center the flag emblem when mounted alone and somewhat lower when centered together with the FI script above it?
 

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Your 1959 Corvette serial number ending in 109156 was assembled on Tuesday, July 21, 1959. The engine assembly date (engine number) would be two to five weeks earlier, and the block casting date would be two to three weeks earlier than the engine assembly date. These are general time frames, with most of the dated parts following this pattern. Accessory subassemblies like starter, generator, distributor, radiator, and relays will precede the July 21st assembly date by two weeks to four months. These subassemblies are shown in the Assembly Instruction Manual (AIM).
 
BTW, the last '59, serial number 109670, was assembled on Friday, August 10, 1959.
 
Hope this helps,
 
Noland Adams


**********

am going nut's,trying to find out the shifter ball thread size,for my 1971 corvette 4 speed.can you help!!!!.i want to buy a white shifter knob,but do not know for sure what size it is.my guess,is 1/2,or 9/16.
 
                                                                           thanks     dennis
From: Larry Richter, SACC Founding Treasurer: Hi  The size is 9/16 - 18 ( if it has the stock unit)  Thanks Larry

 

 

 

**********

Before I start chasing my tail and replace every piece of my brake system, maybe someone out there has experienced the same problem? I have a '61 that every part is fairly new, and  I have a '54 that I just purchased that has'nt been touched in years, both are doing the same thing, brakes work ok when cold, as soon as they warm up, no brakes, I have a full pedal, but it's like pushing on the floorboards, it's hard as a rock, what's up? I just can't think of one particular thing that would cause this. Thanks for the help, Paul Monaco

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC

Hi;  This could be several problems.  Here are the most common
1-  Check the adjustment of the brakes including the correct setting for the adjusting Screw ( bottom) and
      the adjusting spring.
2.  Very common problem.  The shoes are either incorrect or on backwards.  The front shoe( primary)
      has about 2 inches more material then the rear.  The front shoe (primary) moves downward and the
      back one moves upward until the upper end butts against the anchor pin.  Check this with the drum
      off.
3.  The shoes float free in the brake, check this as they may be against something when the heat builds up.
4.  Along with the above is heat causing the wheel cylinder to not work.  Do you have any trapped air in the
     line?  
     Good luck  Thanks Larry     

**********

Hey guys,

I was wondering if one of the gurus has an explanation and or a picture showing what and where the date code stamped into a 62 radiator should be. According to the literature I’ve read, from the C62 date code on, the code was stamped on the top of the radiator and the aluminum tag that formerly had the date code stamped into it was stuck on instead of screwed. I have a radiator that has the stuck on Harrison tag with no date code, the sawcut on the top of the radiator, but can’t see a date code stamped into the top in the format month/year anywhere??????? Picture attached

From; Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi;  Thanks for the pictures they helped a lot. 
A new aluminum foil Harrison tag began about February 62 ( serial number range 5,000 to 9,000 plus or minus. This foil was stuck to the upper right top of the radiator.  These radiator's had part number (3150916) stamped directly into the top of the radiator slightly to the left of center mount.  The only answer I have for the 64 ( it should be the date) is it was made in 1964, but I do not have a firm answer for that, unless they found a replacement radiator in 64 or later and put it in.  
You have one of these foil, direct stamped units.  Enjoy  and Thanks Larry


**********

I have a 1957 corvette (3889)  with a 2 speed powerglide transmission.......with no transmission fluid dipstick.  I have been looking for a number a years now with no success.  I am now considering having  one fabricated  ( unless you know where I might find one....)at a metal shop and was wondering if you could give me any information with respect to
length, width, cap size and color, etc.  Anything you can tell me would be useful.

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  

Hi,

I am in the same boat with you. I have a '57 powerglide in my '58. I too am missing the dipstick. I have looked for many years myself. I put a '58 dipstick in 20+ years ago a hope for the best. At lease it keeps the oil in and dirt out.



**********
When ordering a new interior for my Inca Silver 58 I was told Charcoal is the correct color for 58 interiors. In Noland Adams Restoration and Technical Guide Vol.1 under 58 corvette color combinations, he says the second series color combination chart deletes Charcoal and adds Black as interior and exterior colors. I just want to make sure this is correct so that I don’t install the wrong color interior.

Thanks
Mike

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Mike,
 
I have the original color charts from the Corvette assembly plant in St. Louis. Charcoal started out as one of the basic colors at the beginning of 1958 Corvette production. Late in the production year Charcoal was changed to black. No reason was ever given, and the exact point of changeover is unknown. In order to have a black interior, your '58 would have to be built in the last 1 1/2 to 3 months of production. I would look at the overspray beside the seats and determine if it is charcoal or black. If you determine it was originally black, go back to the interior vendor. I assume that you are dealing with either Corvette America or Al Knock in Texas. If they need convincing, have Doug Svoboda for Corvette America or Al Knock call me at home at 530) 626-3232 (Pacific time). They both know me, and if you are sure you need black I can convince them. After all, we do want it done right!
 
Good Luck,
 
Noland Adams

**********

Dear Sirs,

 

I have a l962 Corvette, which I just recently took to a Corvette Specialty shop to have a new wiring harness installed.  Before I took it, I noticed when I applied the brakes the gas gauge needle would go either to full or empty depending on how much gas the gauge showed.  Thinking that putting a new harness in the car would take care of the situation, but it didn’t.  They told me that they had contacted the place where they get their wiring harness from and were told that was a problem with some of the ‘62’s and there was no answer, no fix to it.  Further, that some did - some didn’t, and that General Motors couldn’t take care of the problem either.  Do you know of a solution to this problem, or is this the way it will remain? 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President: You have a ground problem. Most likely in one of the tail lights. Run an extra wire from the tail light(s) housing to a good ground. If this helps, hide your new ground wire and you are good to go. What is happening is the ground is back feeding through your gauge.

Also, Noland Adams has a tip..



From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

This is a common problem with 1958 to 1962 Corvettes. Behind the instrument panel there is a single ground wire, which becomes overloaded when more than one device is turned on (brakes, turn signals, radio, Etc.). It is a simple matter of the ground wire becoming overloaded and giving a false gas tank level reading. Install an extra ground wire behind the instrument panel up out of sight. Use a piece of 14 or 12 gauge wire to make sure that you eliminate the problem. No one will ever see it and your gas gauge will show your true gas tank level.

 

**********
Can you tell me the differences in the distributor drive tach vs. the generator drive tach?  I have a 61 tach but I cannot tell if it will work on my 62 corvette.  It came out of a 61 but I don't know if it was early or late.  Would a generator type drive work on a distributor drive?   Is there a difference in appearance?    Mike

From: Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Mike,
 
The 1961 and 1962 tachometers appear identical, but they are not. Between the generator and distributor drives, one turns twice as fast as the other. Right now, I can't remember which is which. As I recall, there is a calibration process where the strength of the magnet in the tachometer head is varied to match the speed of the drive unit. Call a speedometer shop that is familiar with Corvettes and they can give you the correct info.
 
Good luck,
 
Noland Adams

**********
Need your help solving an issue with my 1960 Corvette.  Recently purchased my "dream car" and a couple of months ago and all has been fine as I've taken it out for the round about town cruise.  Today decided to take it out on the interstate and get it up to a highway speed (around 70 mph).  When I got the car up to around 70, it started feeling like it was fishtailing around.  The feeling was either like the axle was shifting around or a tire was rolling off the rims.  Checked the tires and all looks OK there.  Crawled under the car and the rear axle looks fine but did notice a couple of things:
1.  Noticed a nylon strap on the left side (just hanging not touching the axle and on the right side the strap is missing.  I can see where the straps had touched the axle in the past so not sure if this could be the problem.
2.  Measured the distance from the center of the tires on the drivers side (101.5 inch) and Passenger side (102 inches).  Not sure if a 1/2 difference is OK.

Do you have any suggestions or thoughts as to what might be going on?

Thanks,
Dan

From Larry Richter, founding treasurer of SACC:

Hi;  You could have several problems.  The One half inch is material on the car.. It could be anything from a bent rear spring, bend axle housing, rear spring bushings gone or wore out to a bent tire rim, and on and on.  You may even have front suspension problems.  I would suggest that you take the car to a good four wheel alignment shop that has the knowledge or the measurements for the car.  They should be able to either tell you what is wrong or be able to fix the problem.  Do not let them just start to change the parts until it goes away, it needs to be fixed.  Thanks Larry

 

**********
Note to Robert Round - you need to take the lock off your email so I can open it. Also, please put 'SACCTECH' as the subject.  Thanks...Doc

**********
Application form - Question on Solid Axel #1 and #2 do you mean the vin # of the corvette?

From Noland Adams, Founding President of SACC:  

Neil,
 
Yes, we're assuming that you may have more than one solid axle Corvette, that's why we have #1 and #2. About the term serial number or Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), the correct term for 1953 to 1969 Corvettes was the serial number. In 1970 GM ( and the other auto manufacturers) used a standard alphanumeric identification number called a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). Although the term serial number is technically correct for a solid axle Corvette, most folks do like you did- they use the term VIN for all years. So, use the term you want, we're talking about the identification number for a specific vehicle.
 
Thanks for asking,
 
Noland Adams


**********

I need help to solve a problem with my '58 Vette windshield.  When I connect the convertible top, the

top of the windshield frame pulls up enough that the top of the glass starts to show.  The

windshield was professionally  installed.  I believe the frame structure is

not broken.  Also, is there such a thing as an aftermarket rubber molding

that would cover the glass separation?

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  Both of your windshield posts are broken at the dog leg. You are not going to like to hear this. The only way to fix this is to remove your windshield, no easy task. Check the GM service manual for removal. Send the pot metal post to Corvette Central in Sawyer, MI. They will attach a replacement plate to bottom of the post and make it better than new. This is a common problem caused by two items. (1) The pull of a soft for 50 years and (2) glass installers prying the glass frame apart just enough to slide a replacement windshield into to frame. Pot metal will only flex so many times before breaking

From: Larry Richter, founding treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  What happened is that the top frame was not fit to the car before the canvas was installed.  This is my suggestion.  First put the top down and make sure the windshield is back in the rubber.  You may need to pull the windshield off the car to get this correct. " ouch".  Then take remove the canvas off the top frame and fit the frame to the top, including the door glass and windshield.   It should snap down front and back and the door glass should fit to the top.  The top frame needs to be straight on the top of the window with the rubber installed.  The adjustments are behind the seats for the top frame. Make sure it fits in all areas every time as the raise and lower the frame. This includes the windshield and the back lid. Then ( made need to get a new canvas top)( "ouch") and attach it to the frame.  You may want a professional to install the canvas.  There is no quick fix.  Thanks Larry

**********

 I am writing at the request of my husband, Richard Howell who is a member of SACC.  We have a 2007 Supplement to the Road Assistance Directory and would like to know if there is any way we could obtain an updated version of this information. On Sept. 15th we are heading out in our 1964 Corvette for the New England states for 8 days.  The fact that we are taking a 45 year old car that distance is a slight gamble but something we always wanted to do in the '54 that we own but now that it is a "trailer queen" as I have lovingly titled it we will be doing it via the 10 year newer version.  Our main stops will be Vermont for Hemmings Motor News, Boston area, Plymouth, and on to Cape Cod & maybe Block Island.  We would feel much better if we knew their were SACC members along the way that if necessary we could call and get suggestions if the need arises (either for repairs or suggestions of places not to miss.) 
 
Thank you for any help you could give us.

From Ken Amrick, Editor of On Solid Ground:  
The Road Assistance Directory is now a part of the Roster.  The 2009 "Roster and Road Assistance Directory was distributed along with the Summer issue of the magazine.
After each member's phone numbers there is a column entitled "Road Assistance" If that member is participating, there is a "Y" in the column for YES.  

 

 

 

 

**********
Hi,

I live in Merrick, New York. I have a 1960 Corvette and like to have the steering gear box rebuilt. Do you know of anyone who does this type work so I know its done correctly.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC:

Hi:  If you call the Corvette Stop at 1-800-924-2493 they can help you.  Ask for Drew and tell them I referred you to him.  He does a super job.  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

How do you replace the fuel line that runs from the tank to the fuel pump on a 1959 Corvette? I have been told the engine must be removed for access.

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC

Hi:  You do not need to remove the engine to replace the fuel line.  My first question is why do you need to replace the line?  If you have rust in the carburetor you must find where the rust is coming from first, generally this is the fuel tank.  However there may be other problems.  Check the fuel neck ( from the cap to the tank) I have seen a lot of rust in this area, or it may be the fuel pump in and of its self.
    Assuming the short line from the tank to the long line is good.  There is a connection to the long line on the right side just above the sway bar mounting. ( you will need to drain the tank at this point).  The long line generally goes on the outside of the frame to another connection about 3 inches from the fuel pump. There are several clips holding the line to the frame.  It is simpler to remove the right front tire and possibly some other items to have access.  You can bend the long line, but be careful not to kink the  line. This can be disconnected at this point.  The forward short flex line goes into the fuel pump.  When it is apart replace this flex line and the fittings.  Be very careful because these brass fittings are easily damaged.  I will admit that space is very tight but with the correct tools it is not a hard project.
    Corvette Central has the parts in the 53-62 Book   800-345-4122   Good luck and let me know if you have other questions.   Thanks Larry

**********

Good Morning,  You may not be the one to direct this question to but if not would you please pass it on to the proper person?
 
We are members of Solid Axle Corvette Club and have been for many years.  We are planning a trip to the New England States beginning Sept. 15th and would feel a bit more comfortable knowing we have a current listing of the Road Assistance Directory.  The one we have is 2006 with a 2007 Supplement.  Could you please tell us how we can obtain this information or even if you can copy, paste, and send via e-mail the portion containing information on Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. 
 
We have always wanted to take a Corvette on a long trip like this and since the 54 is a fresh frame off restoration we have decided to take the 64.  If you would ask any of our friends they would all tell you we are nuts for taking a 45 year old car on a trip like this but WHAT DO THEY KNOW?????   In examining our information we realized that things certainly do change in three short years looking at the information on members that were personal friends of ours, let alone everyone else.  This rapid change in this length of time also gave us both a loud message that we should do this now because you never know what lies ahead. 
 
Thank you in advance for any help you can give us. 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  If you are a current member of SACC you should have received one with the second mailing of the year.( for the year 2009)  You can contact the editor Ken Amrick at vette5362@mail.com   Thanks and have a good trip.  Larry
 

 

**********

Hi just wondering if you have any links to a demo tape etc. of a installation and adjustments of a soft top frame on a 59 vette
Kind regards Lou

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi;  Al Knoch at 800-880-8080 or e-mail at alknoch@flash.net  has them.  The most important item is you must have the frame fitted and adjusted to the car in all areas before installing the cover.  Good Luck Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

Hello:  I have a stock 1962 corvette fuelly. I am in the process of detailing the chassis.  Was it common for the 1962 to have visible wax pencil shim marks on the chassis? The Quanta detailing kit gives me the pencil, but no indication as to the location of the marks. I've seen mid-years with shim marks, but not solid axles. Please advise.  Thanks.  JC

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  I do not believe there were any shim marks on the Solid Axle cars.  I have never seen any on the original cars.  The machine to measure the height of the frame, came in for the 63 and up cars. They used two different colors to indicate the shims required.  White generally means one and red or orange generally means 5.  Let me know if you find any real evidence of original solid axle cars  with shim marks.  Thanks Larry


**********

Hi. I just purchased a 'driver' quality 1960 vette after long years of

> wishing I hadn't sold my '59 in '71. I'm not unique in that. My

> intention is to bring it back to as close to original as I can. I will

> need to look for the right drive train as everything has been changed.

> I'm hoping you can help me establish the build date from the Vin

> number. It ends in 109156 which must be near the end of production for

> that year. That will help me to know what to look for. One of your

> answers to a similar question has already been helpful in determining

> that the tach red line suggests it was a 270 or 290 FI. Is the

> location of the crossed flag insignia on the sides a further clue as

> to FI or not? In other words, did the factory center the flag emblem

> when mounted alone and somewhat lower when centered together with the

> FI script above it?

 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC: 

Hi: Great find and when you are finished enjoy the car.

First you need to purchase 3 books

Noland Adams Vol 1 ( 53 to 62)

The 1960 Assembly Manual

NCRS Judging manual for 58-60

These three will answer a lot of questions and solve a lot of problems for

you.

On your questions. You car was built the first working day of July 1960.

What that means is that all the parts should be dated 6 months or less

before the assembly date. Generally the car parts will be dated about one to

two months (April 15 to June 15 ) before assembly.

As to what was the original horse power or was it a fuel unit. The one spot

that should be still original is the firewall. Look directly behind the

distributor and if there is a hole about 2.5 inches wide and about 1 inch

high it was a fuel unit. All fuel injection cars had a distributor tack

drive and all carb units had the drive on the back of the generator. You

may find a bracket or holes on the drivers side ( left ) fender about half

way back that held the air cleaner for the fuel unit. If no evidence either

place is was a carb car.

On the fenders unless it has the original fenders and many do not, it will

not tell you anything. The injection script is located about 4 and 1/4

inches forward of the door opening. Oh, yes someone may have changed the

tack.

Good Luck and let us know and questions or problems you have. Thanks Larry Yes you can join SACC. and the club welcomes you.

 

**********

Hi, my name  is Joseph Hydell.I was refered to Solid Axle and NCRS by NCOA. I would very much appreciate help with following.In  1971 i purchased a 1961 corvette,in Calif. About5 yrs ago I decided to restore the car,stripped the car totally,ever screw out,all paint off.It was an enormous undertaking as I know nothing about cars.I am proud to say  I did a * job.My problem is .Last year my home burned down.I had to sell the car.I sold it to a local police officer,price somewhat negotiable,and verbal,To a point,He stopped paying me short of $2000.Friday is small claims court.His  issue,I'm sure will be stress cracks,on front end,Something he was aware of ,shown on my video tape.However without some refrence,to the fact that this was  common with61,62 vettes,As this is his town,I don't have a chance.Any leeds,I appreciate greatly.One note,I was sure to give him Noland Adams guide.Very very little survived the fire That book did,and so did ELVIS' autograph.   THANK YOU, very much,  Joe

From Brad Bean, SACC VP: 
Sorry to hear about your misfortune. Without getting into a "he said, no he said" discussion as to whether he was made aware of the stress cracks prior to the purchase... vertical creases on the front fenders, centered above the wheel wells (of varing severity) are fairly common on the 1958 through 1962 body style, especially '58 - '60.

These creases often develop due to the weight of the front end and the front end being attached to the frame. As the top of the fender is horizontal, it has some ability to flex as the car vibrates and bounces. However, at the smallest point where the fender curves downward and becomes vertical, it will often bow outward and over time develop a crease (and later a crack) in the fiberglass.

Unfortunately, the proper solution is often to replace the fender or entire front clip.

To grind out the fiberglass and fill it in, never looks right on the fender surface, and (under the same stress that created the problem to begin with) the repaired areas will ultimately crack where the repaired areas attach to the fender. Also, you can't hide the reinforced repairs on the underside from NCRS judging or during the re-sale process.

Brad

**********

I am  having a problem getting my horns to work on my 61. I have replaced all the wiring  and everything else works. I can make the horns work when jumping  the red and blace wires at the horn relay but when I try the horn button nothing. I have tried another relay with the same result. Tha tan wire is connected at the column.   I am lost. i simply do not know how the horn circuit works. Any way to test the tan wire?

From: Noland Adams, founding President of
SACC:  

Pat,
 
It's been a long time since I've worked on the horn relay, but I think I can explain the principle. First of all, it takes a lot of watts (voltage times amperage) to get the horns to produce its loud noise(s). A heavy duty horn relay is added to the circuit to handle the power load required by the horn(s). In order to get the relay to pull in and send power to the horns, a wire runs from the rerlay through the column, ending at the horn button. This wire is always "hot", so when you push the horn button, you are grounding the wire, which pulls in the relay, and the horns produce noise. You should have power on the wire in the column at all times. If this wire shorts out- maybe while turning a corner- you will go batty trying the silence those blaring horns.
 
Try installing a jumper on the relay where the tan wire is connected. By grounding this wire, the horns should sound off. Then check the wire up through the column to the horn button. Somewhere there's an open circuit like a broken wire or maybe a bad relay.
 
Hope this helps.
 
Good Luck,
 
Noland Adams

**********

I have a 1960 vette and the key will

> not open the trunk, it

> used to open ok but now the key just turns and the trunk

> will not open. How do I

> get it open to repair it ???
   John

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  You will not like what I am about to tell you. You will need to break the plastic emblem, then try not to damage the aluminum backing any more that you have too, but you just as well beat it to death as well. Then you can use this round hole to reach the latch and open your trunk. Then you can repair the problem of the key no longer working to release the trunk latch. Do save the chrome ring however.
From; Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:  

Hi:  Just break out the large trunk emblem and reach in with a stiff wire or something that will grab the latch to move it.  You may need to feel around to see what is broken.  Would suggest that you buy the new part that failed and a new trunk emblem. Install the new lock first to make sure it works correctly ( several times ) then install the new trunk emblem.  Good luck  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

Hello,

I have a 54 corvette and am attempting to remove the steering box and steering shaft. I have removed all the proper bolts as well as the firewall grommet and dash supports but the shaft cannot clear the side wall of the engine compartment. My question is does the shaft need to be separated from the steering box first before removal, or is there a trick to remove them as one piece?  

Thanks,

Mitch

 

From: Noland Adams, President Emeritus, SACC:  

The 1953 to 1955 Corvette steering column and the steering box containing the gears were installed as a unit in the body at the Corvette assembly plant (Flint or St Louis). Then the body was lowered onto the chassis and along with the steering column and box, and they were bolted in place.
 
After all of these years, it's no surprise that the steering box needs rebuilding. It will probably need a bearing set, and perhaps new gears. Removing the steering column is a difficult job, indeed. Some owners have given up and removed the body from the chassis. Besides providing easy access to the steering box and column, there are many other items that can be easily reached at the same time, including body repairs and body mount repairs.
 
Another method is to cut the inner fender panel, and repair it after the rebuilt steering column and box are reinstalled. None of this is quick and easy.
 
The steering box and column is easier to remove/replace on 1956 and 1957 Corvettes, because more space was provided. 1958 and later Corvettes have even more space, so their steering parts are fairly easy to remove/replace.
 
Good luck with your 1954 Corvette repairs!
 
Cheers,
 
Noland Adams

From Max Brockhouse, SACC President:  The box and shaft are one item. They have to be removed as a whole. Ideally you need to remove the body to get the steering shaft and box off of an early Corvette. But you can remove parts of the front axle and spring and related parts and after much time and work you can pull the steering box down and out with the Corvette on a lift. Good luck with you project.

From: Larry Richter, Past Treasurer, SACC:  

Hi:  You need to remove the steering wheel and the hub ( with the turn signal switch ).(Careful of the wires to the horn and turn signal switch)( and remove the plate around the column) with the car up in the air, you should be able to slide it out the bottom of the car. If you cannot get it up in the air you will need to take part of the left suspension or steering gear loose.  If you do mark the shims ( if any so it can be reinstalled later. ) You will need to turn it to clear the steering gear under the car.  Any questions let me know.   Thanks Larry

 

**********

Hello,
 
I have been the proud owner of E54S001601 for the past 5 years.  I purchased the car from a gentleman who passed away from Sandpoint Idaho who had owned the car for over 30 years.  He had only put 100 documented miles on the car driving it on to his trailer and off while having it stored in the Talyor/Parker GM dealership over the past 30 years. 
 
I am starting an NCRS restoration and have found black paint under the 3 or so coats of Polo White which I was hand stripping.  I have taken picture of it but wanted to know what kind of other documentation is needed or can I find out more information on black 54's that were produced by GM???Since only 5 or 7 black 54's are know to be produced. E54S001601 is the first 600th corvette made in 54 and is one of the first 1,000 made for corvettes.....  I have contacted DMV in Washington State and they do not hold any records past 15 years and do not even have microfish to check old records on historic cars....
 
Any information would be greatly appreciated of you could lead me to the right person or persons who may know more about 1954 corvettes.  I am SACC member 2929.
 
 
Sincerely,
 
mark

 

Hi:  Black was not used after March 5, 1954.   The start of Production for the 54 was Dec 28, 1953 and there are generally no production records available for the 54.  However, NCRS has documentation that S.N. 2628 was produced on May 18 of 54.  If you average this out it is about 350 + or - per month so you car was built ( on the average of the first 1628 cars) toward the end of February of 54.  Therefore, it could be an original black car.  Look in all the little hidden places for evidence of over spray on the raw fiberglass.  You should document this in very good pictures for future reference.   It should have a red interior ( same as the white cars).  You can also contact Noland Adams regarding additional information on these early cars.   P.S.  I live 50 miles North of Portland so you can contact me if you wish.  Thanks Larry

**********

Sirs,
I am in the process of changing the weatherstripping around the windshield in my 1960 Corvette. I started the WS at the bottom of the glass and progressed to the sides and around the corners of the glass. It looks a bit short of fitting around the rest of the glass! I really don't want to pull and stretch the WS too much to fit the windshield! (I don't want to break this original windshield!!). Should I let this WS soak in the sun for awhile or is there something else important that I am missing in my installation process? Please get back ASAP as the cruise season is short enough here in the East!!
Thanks,
George Full

From: Larry Richter, Past Treasurer, SACC:
Hi: The windshield rubber is made to fit very tight.  I use hand cleaner (GOOP) so it slides around the glass. Have a helper and put a small amount in the channel of the rubber and put the bottom on first and around the corners.  Make sure that it is pulled tight. then up both sides to the top and it should fit.  Be very careful that you do not put excess pressure on the glass in ways that will bend the glass as it will break.  I do not put any sealant from the glass to the rubber as the windshield will work a little as you drive the car. Make sure that you adjust the windshield to the top before the reassemble the dash.  Thanks Larry

 

**********

Hello,
I am having trouble with my 59 Corvette Powerglide overheating.  In everything I have read I see no reference to any type of tranny cooler?  I do see in 63 they have one, but not for the early models?  Any help?  Do I need to go to an aftermarket of some type?
Thankyou,
Scott Gross

From: Noland Adams, Founding President:

Scott,
 
The first Corvette Powerglide transmission cooler was installed by the St. Louis factory in mid-1963 production. First, you stated that you're having trouble with your "'59 Corvette Powerglide overheating". Then you asked about a transmission cooler. My first question to you: is the transmission overheating or is the radiator/cooling system overheating? The 1959 Corvette is fairly lightweight car with a 283 cid engine, and normally does not need a transmission cooler.
 
So, do you have a larger engine that may put more strain on the Powerglide transmission? Is your problem with the radiator/coolant overheating? There are many possible causes for coolant overheating- a plugged radiator, a bad thermostat, bad hoses, timing out of adjustment, Etc. Start by using a 50 percent mix of Prestone anti-freeze and distilled or deionized water. Now, is it really overheating, or are you just getting a high coolant temperature reading? It could be your dash instrument's temperature reading.
 
There are so many variables here, but perhaps we can eliminate the obvious potential problems, and come up with a solution.
 
Thanks for asking,
 
Noland Adams

**********
Sirs,
> I own a 1960 red Corvette that I've had for 25 years. The windshield weather
> stripping is starting to separate from the glass. I am very tempted to play
> with this issue but something tells me I better ask, first! Is it worth
> tackling on my own?
> George Full

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:

This is something you can do yourself.  But how much time and how nimble are you?  You will need to pull the dash loose at the door post to access two 1/2 nuts.  Then about every 6 inches all along the front or bottom of the windshield frame are small nuts that will need to be removed.  These are accessed from under the dash on the inside of the Corvette.  If the pot metal parts of the windshield post are cracked at the bottom when you remove the assembly, have them fixed as well.


**********

Gentlemen,

> I own a 1958 that my dad bought in 1960 and gave to me in 1970, after
> plenty abuse and neglect I have been trying to bring it> back to > correct as possible. I would be interested to know the
build date (June 13th is my guess) of the car and confirm correct dates for the components since most were out of the vehicle at one time or another. Car is #7946: Engine stamp F603CQ, E 21 8 Heads E 16 8  Dist 8-E-23  Intake D-25-8  Thanks

>Steve

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President: 
Your 1958 would have been assembled on June 17 mid day of production.

 


 

**********

Dear Sirs:

 

Here’s a good one.  I have a ’58 Corvette and there is a minimum ½ inch gap along the left side of the trunk lid, along the rear wheel.  The trunk lid does not go all the way down to meet the body near the rear wheel area of the body, on both side of the car.  The right side is at lease ¼ gap above the body.

I tried to use shim, but the shims cannot make that much of an adjustment.

A friend told me what needs to be done is must use something to bend the trunk lid down on the edges that don’t go down far enough to meet the body, and when the trunk lid cracks just repair the cracks.

  Maybe there’s another ’58 trunk lid for sale?  Trading up to another ’58 car is too expensive for me in Hawaii.  Help!

  Aloha,
Eric

From: Brad Bean, SACC Vice-President:

The car has apparently been damaged in an accident and not repaired properly. The only real solution is to take the car to a reputable restoration/auto body shop and have them make the appropriate repairs. However, this will not be inexpensive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I have a 57 with a state vin number.  Where is the vin on the frame?

From: Larry Richter, founding Treasurer of 
SACC: 

Hi:  The vin number is stamped on the left side (driver).  As you sit in the car it is under your feet.  It could be forward or back about a foot, and on either side of the top of the frame.  If the frame is in really good condition you should be able to take a wire brush and clean the top of the frame, between the body and the frame, and find the number ( or part of the number). with a mirror.  If the frame has some rust ( most did) it is gone.  You could pull the body and give it a close look and perhaps have some of the number.  These were stamped for control numbers and some were very lightly hit.  Good luck  Thanks Larry

 

 

From: Noland Adams, President Emeritus, SACC: 

Dear David
 
Re: 1957 serial number on frame.
 
Before 1970 the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) was called the Serial Number, so that's what I call it. The number is stamped on top of the frame's left hand side rail. If the body is off of the frame, the number is located on the left (driver's side) of the center of the frame's main X member. With the driver seated in the car, the number on the frame is just a bit to the left of his or her hip pocket. With the body installed, there is a small gap between the body and the frame. By using wedges, you can "bend" the fiberglass and increase the gap. Then use sandpaper or a small brush to clean the frame where the number is located. The numbers are deeply impressed in the top of the side rail; perhaps it helps to locate this low spot. Then, using a dental mirror, read them- but they'll be backwards.
 
Once an experienced NCRS judge read the serial number on my frame incorrectly. I was almost penalized for having a replacement frame. So read the frame's serial number carefully.
 
If you need a serial number plate replacement, perhaps I can help. Contact me at nolandadams@internet49.com.
 
Good Luck!
 
-Noland Adams

 

**********

1959 Corvette.

 

Is it allowed for a non member of your club to ask you a technical question?

 

I need to remove the power glide transmission because of an oil leak

Can I remove the transmission without pulling the engine?

 

Regards

 

Henninng Sorensen

Denmark

 

From Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  You can remove it either way.  I prefer to take the engine out with the trans attached.  You will need to have the correct tools either way.  I would suggest that if you have never done this before and do not have the correct tools ( ie engine hoist, lifts, manuals etc,) you need to pay a professional to do the task.  You could do more dollar damage then you will save.  Have fun and enjoy.  Thanks Larry

 

**********

I just bought a 1960 corvette basket case and I want to find out its history
do you know how I can?
Thanks
Gary

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC

Hi;  The history on old cars is difficult if not impossible to find out, if you do not have the original documentation.  Below are a few ways that may or may not work.  G.M. does not have this information on the cars built in St. Louis. (54 to part of 81)( part of 1981 forward they do have this for cars built in Bowling Green.)
1-  Check in the state where the car was last registered.  They may go back a few owners or they may not.  If the car has not been registered for a while, this may be the end.  They may be able to tell you which state the car came from.
2- Look around the car to see if there is any hidden paper work, repair orders, registrations anything and go from there.
3- Talk to the old ( really old ) time Corvette Owners in the area you purchased the car and perhaps some one will remember the car.
4- Look under the front windshield, in the trunk and under weather striping, to see if you can determine the original color, this may help.
5- Look for any major repair, or modifications in the fiberglass, then check around the long time body shops body shops.
I wish you good luck, and that is what you are going to need.  Thanks and have fun.  Larry

**********

I 've owned this car since 1968,it's a 61 vette, and always had a 62 interio,trim & ect, but titled as a 61 Chevrolet conv. the vin is10867109866 it's roman red/red interior can you help? I want to freshin it up,but don't know whether to make it look like a 61,or62it doesn't have 62 coves, that protrude .Thank you ,hope you can help sincerely John Marshall


From: Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  There are several differences between the 61 and 62, including the block ( if original) should be casting number 3789935 for a 61 and all 62's have 3782870 casting. All 61's had a silver finish grill, and 62's had a black finish. You can look to the glass ( if original) the letter code is L for 61. It goes on and on. but you have a 61 serial number, in fact more than 1000 from the end of production. Your car was build about the 10th of June 61, and production ended for the 61 the end of July. Look under the seat there may be a black metal tag about 1X4 inches with the seat assembly date. ( hope it is still there). My guess is that some one put a 62 interior in the car back before 68.  It appears to be in fact a 61.  If I can help any more let me know, and enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry


Dear Sirs:
 
I'm running a 1961 with a 4 barrel carburetor and I have a problem keeping engine paint on my intake manifold at the cross-over.
 
The cross-over keeps peeling the paint off due to the heat generated and I'm wondering if I can block off the cross-over to prevent the paint loss.
 
The car is only used in the summer and apart from a slower choke release, are there any other issues that I'll encounter if I proceed with my idea?
 
It's my understanding that the cross-over serves to further atomize the fuel in the carburetor by using the heat and that given it's a summer only car, I shouldn't run in to other issues.
 
I use heat rated engine paint, but the problem persists and I have just finished acid dipping the manifold to clear it of any impurities.
 
I would appreciate your input on this.
 
Many thanks.:

From: Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi;   Several items or a combination of several items.  (1)  The exhaust heat raiser could be only opening part way. Get the correct new one and install it. (2) Timing of the engine could be off 2 or 3 degrees. (3) You have a valve problem or problems that one or more are not closing completely. Do a compression check and a leak down test to see if do have this problem.  (4) The carburetor may have improper settings. Have a scope test for settings and exhaust gas readings.  (5) most discount store bought paint will not take the heat.  Go to a auto paint store and get very high temp paint.  Make sure the manifold is completely clean before painting and do not put more than two thin coats on. Too much paint may be the problem.  A minor amount will burn off.  Thanks and enjoy the car.  Larry
 

**********

When I touch the brakes on my 62, the gas needle shifts position and returns to its original position once the brake is released.  What do you suggest to alleviate this movement?
 
Best regards,
 
Landry

From: Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:
Hi;  That is a grounding problem.  One way to fix that is to run a separate wire from the back of the dash (Metal) to a good solid ground.  If the wire is brittle and will not bend easily you may want replace part or all of the wiring in the car.  This is a safety issue at this point.  Look very close at the wire from the brake light switch and see if there are any problems. Thanks and enjoy the car .  Larry

 

**********

Hello.  For years I have been interested in  purchasing a 58 - 62 Corvette.  I don't know much about the mechanicals and  was wondering if you could recommend someone I could retain as a consultant to  assist me in buying a car.  There are lots of nice looking cars on the  internet but they can't all be as nice as they're described.  Thank  you.


 
From Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:
There are companies/individuals who do this for a fee, but they are specific to a locale.  The best way to do this is to first find a car, then find some qualified in that area to look the car over.  They will render an opinion, but usually only to the mechanical and physical condition of the car, not it's correctness or authenticity.

Brad

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi I just bought a 1959 corvette It has a British Columbia assigned vin because when it came to my province in 1983 it had no vin tag how do I find the original vin number or where should I look do I have to remove the body

From: Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  You probability will need to remove the body.  The vin number is on the top of the frame rail drivers side about the center of the X brace. There is no exact location so look forward and back, side to side. As you are standing on the drivers side looking down ( body removed) you may be able to read it.  Some you can read with a mirror with some wire brushing in the are between the body and frame.   Even if you remove the body it may be rusted beyond identification.  If the car has a frame section in that area it is gone.  Good Luck  Thanks Larry


**********

Hello,

 I have a question on my 1961 corvette 283, all stock 2x4 dual quad car.

What should the volt meter read in the car if the generator is doing

 the job correctly? My car shows zero while running, goes below the

negative number when I run the lights. Battery will go dead if I run with the lights on for

awhile. Checked out system and seems to be working ok, no broken wires,

ordered new regulator, but not sure if this is the issue or not. I

was just looking to find out what my gauge should read in the car.

Regards,

David Seymour

From: Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi: When the car is sitting with the ignition off the gauge should be inthe center. Ignition on and headlights on it should read about 2 to 4 ampsdischarge. On the starting it should go to 10 to 12 discharge, once the carstarts it should go to 12 to 15 amps charge and then over a 5 to 15 minute

period should be back to near zero. With the car running it should be at 1to 2 amps charge once the battery is recharged. Set it up for 1000 RPM. A lower RPM will cause a discharge at idle and this is normal. Do not set itup for more than 16 amps charge, as it will do damage to your radio. Be aware of the over the counter voltage regulators as some can not be set upcorrectly and others there is no setting on them. You could have severalproblems:

1. Bad Battery

2. Voltage regulator not set up correctly

3. Generator not adjusted correctly ( yes they are adjustable) 4. A short in the wiring ( test this by taking the fuse out one at a time

and see what happens) If you have the original wiring I would suggest you

replace it with new.

The Best place to get all the details is in the 1961 Passenger Car Shop Manual Pages pages 9-2 to 9-12.

If you send me your address I will photo them and mail it to you.

Thanks and have fun Larry

 

**********
HI:
 I've got a 57 Corvette I'm restoring and I'm putting on disc brakes for piece of mind. I've got the front kit and the adapters for the rear that use the 88 Iroc discs. My question is what MANUAL dual master cylinder should I be using to run the four discs. I don't want to have a hard pedal every time I hit the brakes. I have been told that I should forget the four disc brake idea because of not being able to run a power booster and just run the front discs and put a good set of linings on the drums in the rear. Any thoughts on this?
 
  Thanks for your time,
           Brent Fields
From; Larry Richter, founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  The one and most important item is the complete system must be balanced for all 4 wheels.  You cannot buy one part one place and another somewhere else. Generally, you need a 1 inch bore and a master cylinder specific for the four wheel disk brake system.  The proportioning valve must match the master and the brakes.  Call Pedro at 714-771-6569 at ABS Power Brakes. You may need to purchase some parts to make it work correctly.  Note: some of the units require you to drill another hole in the fire wall to lower the pedal rod.  The four wheel disk brake system works great when set up correctly.  Enjoy the car  Thanks Larry 

**********

Do these steering box casting numbers identify an early Corvette unit?

 C1UR 3550 B (main body)

 C1UR 3580     (side flange)
We are building a Nostalgia Gasser and have located an old tube axle adapted to early Corvette spindles......the steering box that came with it is still a mystery.

 Thanks,

Ron

From Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC:

Hi:  I have no idea what you have for a steering box.  After considerable research it appears it is not a early Corvette.  Housing part numbers were 56XXXXX ( a seven number code ) The early group numbers were 6.5XX to 6.9XX.  I will keep looking but it appears it is not even a G.M. ( perhaps after market )  Thanks and enjoy the car.  Larry

**********

I am preparing a 56 Corvette for NCRS judging in 2009.    The last time the car was flight judged by NCRS, the battery had points deducted because it was not a “tar top”  battery.

  Can you direct me to a source  of  NCRS “correct” batteries?

  Thanks,
Don

From: Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer

Yes:  Contact Restoration Battery at 513-574-4481 and ask for a real tar top.  It should come to you dry and you add the acid and water.  The top will be a dull black and sticky ( not a plastic top that some of them have.)  good luck with the 56  Thanks Larry

 

**********

hi
just wondering if you can help me with my 59 vette
I have a sag mark in both front fenders above the wheel and when I look behind the back support bracing seems all original and without any accident damage or previous repairs but in that area it seems like there is like a joint or somethink in the bracing and it seems like the weakest spot, with years of saging etc. the front body mount under the radiator may have dropped a little causing the body to do this Would you think I am on the right track. I have restored the frame/chassis and about to fit body back and repair this area which would be the best way
Cheers Lou 

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC

Hi:  There is really no way to repair the sag over the wheels on the 58-60 Corvettes.  Yes you can build it up, but the glass is all ready weaken.  Primary reason is individuals leaning over and putting weight on the fender for 50 years.  You will never be happy to do it this way.  Two suggestions (1) Call Jerry at 1-800-550-1200 and see if he will make you a section of the fender that you need.  The problem with that is there will always be a cut mark  in the fenders and the repair will always show upon close examination.  This way is cheaper (maybe) than the other way.  (2)  Call Corvette Image at 503-492-0164 and buy all new glass.  They make the glass with the correct bonding strips and feel of the glass.  You may want to consider a complete front end.  Be sure to get the chassis 4 wheel aligned before attaching the body. If you do this make sure the glass man know early Corvettes and the measurements or it will be a mess.  The only way the front body mount can drop with out frame damage is either a crack in the glass or a shim or two have fallen out. Thanks and good luck.  Larry

**********

Is there a differential offset on the 61?
 
Thank You, Ed

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC

Hi:  All the 60-61-62 rear suspension systems are the same.  There is no differential offset on the 61.  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********
Hello- I just retired and am taking on a restoration project on my 59 vette which I have owned for 29 years. I would like to replace the door window liners which I have already purchased. Is there anywhere I can get written instructions on how to do this? do the windows and regulator have to come out? how, etc. appreciate any info. thanks, Dale

From Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC

Hi:  Yes the inter workings of the door need to come out, due to the fact that you cannot get the lower screws ( or rivets if you so choose to put in)  Originally the front edge had Phillips screws and metal retainers in addition to glue on the posts.  This is a good time to grease all of the window gears and door opening parts, plus align the window.  I can send you a three page instructions on this procedure, but if you are going to do a lot or restoration on the car you need three items (1) the Assembly manual for 59  (2)  The Corvette Servicing Guide (3) Noland Adam's Book  " the Complete Corvette Restoration and Technical Guide Vol # 1.  These will tell you most of what you need to know.  Let me know Thanks Larry.

**********

I am currently trying to make a deal on a 1957 and 1961 Corvette. I noticed that the newer 1961 has a linkage that run from the rear axle to the frame on each side (located over top of the rear leaf springs). I didn’t see this on the 1957 but I was wondering what year the linkage started and what it’s purpose is. I suppose it is to control axle wrap or to aid in braking performance but I thought I would ask. Is there any web sites that might show the difference between the frames in greater detail?

 

Terry Simpson

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi: :  All 56-57 Frames are generally the same, except for the transmission mounting, stick to automatic.  The 58-60 Frames are all three slightly different.  Beginning in 59 the traction bar was added (frame to rear axle housing), in 60 the Rear Stabilizer bar was added.  ( lower spring hanger to frame).  The 61-62 frames were changed again due to the rear body mounts, for the new rear body configuration.  The 57 did not have the traction bar or the rear stabilizer bar.  I would suggest that you purchase Noland Adam's "Restoration & Technical Guide- Vol.1"  This give you very good details of the frame and a bunch more data on the early cars.  The main purpose was to stop the rear spring wind up with the higher horsepower cars.  A side note, I have a very strong 59 - 270 hp. that in a full speed shift I bent both top leaves of the rear springs. Thanks and enjoy the car.  Larry  

From Max Brockhouse, SACC President:
This rod is called an anti-roll bar, it was added in 1960 to control rear wheel hop.

**********
hi my name is richie i am looking for specs on rearend i have to centers 1 370 nonposi  1 411 posi i want to change the 370 to a posi both ring gears are 37 teeth pinon one has 9 one has 10 i know i have to keep ring and pinion together i need a step by step and tork specs. thanks richie

From Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  Contact Drew at Corvette Stop 1-800-924-2493  They have all the data.  Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

i need to put fuses in the fuse box of a 1962 327-340 4-speed, but when i am under the dash i can't read the small lettering on the right side of the fuse box....can you tell me the values and order of the new fuses...
 
thanks for your help
 
nearly blind in Cincinnati

From Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer: 

Hi  Your flasher unit should be on the lower left, as you face the fuse block under the dash. On the right side should be 6 fuse blanks the are as follows from bottom to top
      1. instrument and clock lights.                        3 amp
      2. heater                                                      10  "
      3. radio                                                          7 1/2 amp
      4. brake, & tail, interior                                  15 amp
      5.   Should be blank   ( No fuse)
      6. Parking Brake alarm                                  10 amp
 
            All are AGC fuses.  The Head lights have a circuit breaker (15amp) separate.
  On the top side of the flasher are some accessory plugs that could have anything plugged in over the years.
 
A word of caution the above is the original, so be careful that your car has not been haywired over the years, test each one separate to see if it does operate the correct circuit.  If it blows the correct amp fuse then you have a short in that circuit.  Do not put a larger fuse, find the short,  as Corvette's burn really good. Use a plastic fuse puller not a screw driver as you may get metal to metal and blow or burn something up.   Good luck   Thanks Larry                               

**********

I have been slowly restoring a 1960 two top roadster while enjoying the ride in Houston , Texas . I discovered a couple of years ago the rear end was not a 3.70 positrack but a 1957 passenger car unit.  I began the search for a P case unit and purchased one in Califorina, rebuilt and ready to install. Unfortunately I learned the hard way.  From the outset the clutches grabbed when in reverse or when turning causing tire drag. I have tried all the suggestions to remedy the problem, GM fluid, Ford fluid, driving in circles (forward and reverse) for extended periods and most anything else you can think of.  The unit has been out twice in recent months and sent to two different specialty shops in the Houston area without success.  The problems cited have included assembled wrong, wrong clutch spacers and the latest was the removal of paint which had been applied to the internal parts at the California shop where it was purchased.  Can anyone suggest a competent rebuild shop where I can ship this unit for a proper rebuild?  I am reinstalling the 1957 unit in order to enjoy the ride in the meantime.  The details on the car, built November 1959, original #’s 283 2x4 and tranny, spending part of its life in California (black CA VIN tag) although I purchased the car in North Carolina in a neglected condition.

Thanks

Pat Murray

From Larry Richter Founding Treasurer, SACC:

Hi:  The problem appears to be a miss-mash of parts.  Call Drew at the Corvette Stop 1-800-924-2493.  He has a guy that can fix the posi.   This may be a little spendy but it will work.   Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

Hello- I am in the process of trying to install a new windshield in my 59 vette via the process of doing it with the frame srill in the car.How do I get the top center piece with the 4 screws off.  is it pried off or how without damaging it? thanks, Dale


From Larry Richter, SACC Founding Treasurer:

Hi:  First off you should not try to install the new windshield with the frame in the car.  You need to remove all 9 bolts ( the two on each side you will need to remove the inside kick panel, as they are at the back edges).  Once the frame is off the car the four screws will come out and this piece snaps off. The end pieces come off by tipping them out. ( you cannot do this with the frame in the car.) Be sure to measure the distance in several places so the new glass is set at the same height and angle as the old one or your top will not fit correctly.  You need to be very careful how you handle the new glass as it will break quickly.  Suggestion, take the frame with the old glass in it along with the new windshield to a glass shop that understands the early Corvettes. After they take the frame apart you may want to polish the stainless and chrome that is the frame.  You should put a new rubber in around the new windshield while it is apart.  What you pay them is cheaper than a new windshield if you break it.  Have fun   Larry

**********

Dear Sirs,
 
    I have a 1961 Corvette with the original 283/ 230 engine, B/W transmission, etc. The car has
been restored to all original except for front disc brakes, dual master cylinder and SS gas tank. 
All gages, even the parking brake light, work. My problem is the passenger door. It lifts slightly
on closing. Enough so that with the window rolled up, and convertible top up, you have "slam"
the door shut.
The door rubs the mating top of the body to a point where there are grooves in the fiberglass.
The drivers door closes perfect.  
My question is: How do you adjust the doors. I have pulled the side panels but am unable to see where
the hinges are attached to the door. None of the assembly manuals I have show this area.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Sincerely,
John

From Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  First off there is no adjustment on the doors except on the latch when the door closes.  What you might do is to find a body shop that knows something about the early Corvettes.  This is usually done by bending the hinges ever so slightly ( They may need to be removed first ).  With proper alignment the door should close correctly. Caution, again be sure the body man knows what they are doing or they may break the body.   The problem with the window is one of two items.  First is the window, it may not be adjusted correctly.  To do this remove the inside door panel.  It will not take very much adjustment.  Second,  the top made need a adjustment.  If the break in the top bow that is over the window is not straight when the top is up that may be some of the problem.  That sag in the top bow has caused a lot of problems. Thanks and enjoy the car.   Thanks Larry

**********

 Gentlemen, I've been looking for a Neutral Safety Switch Assembly and Bracket for my powerglide. Do you know where I may locate one and have one fabricated? Thanks Terry

 

From: Larry Richter, SACC Founding Treasurer:

Hi:  Here is the story.  The 61 Corvette is a one year only on the switch.  I did considerable checking and this is going to be difficult to obtain.  All my parts suppliers do not have one, either NOS, used or repo. It appears that no one is reproducing them.  Beware, some of the suppliers list a 53 to 68 as one part.  During this period there were seven different part numbers in the Corvette parts manual, and therefore not a one size fits all.   The 62 has a slightly different configuration due to the change to an aluminum housing.  The 60 may be able to be modified to fit a 61, perhaps some one will know. All I can say is good luck  Thanks Larry


**********
I have a 58 290hp fuelie that looks to be originally  silver. Do you know the correct  paint codes for body, wheels and the two  different side cove option colors?

 Thanks
Mike

From Brad Bean, SACC Vice President:
I've attached two sheets in a "word" document that should answer all Mike's questions, except one...  The answer to that one is that all wheels on 1958 Corvettes were "silver", regardless of the body color.

Hope it helps.
Brad

Click HERE

 

 

 

 


**********

Hi I'm about to fit a new rear crossmember on my 59 chassis but not sure how it should be done I have the rivvet kit but no instructions don't know how they go in or where to weld and where to fit rivets can you please help, Thank you  

From Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  They are riveted on the back ( two each side) and welded on the front.  This weld needs to be the full width of the frame.  Now a word of caution at this time I would only tack weld the rear cross member on the front and put bolts where the rivets go.  Why? This rear cross member is the rear body mount and the rear inside bumper support plus a couple of other items.  This rear cross member is very critical to the proper alignment of the body.  If it is off just a fraction or your frame is not 100% perfect you will have problems.  When you fit the body and bumpers this brace may need to moved a fraction to have everything fit.  After you fit the body and it is perfect, then pull the bolts and install the rivets and weld the rear brace to the frame.  Also before you do the paint and final fit and painting of the body have the rolling frame with the running gear installed, and get a four wheel alignment at a good shop.  Too many times the body is attached and painted and when the body shop moves the frame around they will break the body, fiberglass cracks really easily.  Thanks Larry


**********

Good evening,
    Thank you so much for the information on the suspension shims. Now could you tell me if there is a video of book out there that you judges use during the inspections of the car. I want it to be right the first time out. I am doing all the work myself in my own garage. I would love to find a restoration video that would guide someone as myself through the correct assembly process of what was painted then assembled or assembled then painted as you mentioned in your first reply to me.
 
    I have the third edition NCRS judging manual but it still leave a lot of questions I have unanswered. I also have Noland Adams Restoration technical guide. I just ordered the NCRS technical guide as I am a NCRS member. Any suggestion in the matters would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 
P.S. What a great web site you run here. It is great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

From Larry Richter, Founding SACC Treasurer:

Hi:  Glad to help. To my knowledge there are no video's available for the chassis on the early cars.  However I have some suggestions for you, (1) From NCRS get the assembly manual for your 60 and the CD for the 58 to 60 model years, these will tell you a bunch. Example if the judging manual and the pictures in Noland's book show a natural bolt holding the part on then there is a good chance the part was painted then assembled on the car. (2) Contact Tim Mickey ( National Team leader for 58-60).  He is listed in the front of the Restorer.  (3) If you can find a 58 to 60 Duntov car somewhere close to where you live and the owner is willing to let you photo the car that will be another good source.  Remember all most none of the G.M. Semi gloss was exactly the same shade, so what do you do.  Say, paint the frame with the way it came out of the can, then add a little flattner to the paint and paint more pieces that the assembled to the frame later.  Then add some more flattener and do more parts. This will give you the slight shade difference.  There are some of the chassis that were left natural.  What I do is to clean them back to the original raw material and cover them with a thin coat of semi-gloss clear.  This keeps it from rusting for a while. Looking down the road, be sure to get a four wheel alignment before you try to fit the body on the frame.  Good Luck  Thanks Larry


**********

Good day to you,
    Do you know where I could buy NOS tapered aluminum shims for the front crossmember of my 1960 corvette? I am just starting a Top Flite restoration and have a long road ahead. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

From Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  The only suggestion I have is the Corvette Stop 1-800-924-2493.  The are very good with the early cars and will be a good source for NOS parts and information (Ask for Noland or Drew)   I believe that Corvette Central has them in Reproduction at 1-800-345-4122.  Remember that you are doing a NCRS restoration so some the parts are either hidden or we ( as National Judges) do not look closely at the parts. Example:  The front shims are almost completely hidden, as are the king pins and break shoes.  Now the bolts holding the A-arms together, the front stabilizer bar, the steering assembly and shocks are visible to the judge.  So be aware what is hidden and what is visible.  We not only judge the configuration but the type of finish on the part.  Be sure to consider if the part was painted and assembled or assembled and then painted, big difference.  Thanks Larry

**********
I'm finally getting to restore my 1961, do you know if the Honduras
>> Maroon
>> was available with a silver insert, or do you know where I can find out?
>> Thanks,
>> J.B.

From Larry Richter, Founding treasurer of SACC:



Hi; The original paint code for your car in a solid color is #523.  The only factory cove color for maroon was white and that was paint code #529.  The
cars were originally painted a solid color then the cove was painted over
the main color. If you are not going to have the car judged and you like
silver in the cove "go for it"  Enjoy the car. Thanks.
 Larry


**********

I have an older corvette and would like to do work on the interior door panels because they are cracking in spots  and would like to know how to repair them by myself and finding out the proper way/tricks and hints from the experts .

Thank you,

Mel

From Larry Richter, founding treasurer of SACC:

 

To my knowledge there is no repair or companies that do repair on door panels on our early cars. You will find various products that claim to but it does not work.  I would suggest you buy new one's, and save the old one's just in case someone really can repair them.  Enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

 

 

 

 

 

**********

Hi, I recently purchased a 1961 vett and stumbled across your site while trying to get info on wheel alignment. While I'm at it I have other questions also. Answers to any or all questions will be greatly appreciated. Some background first. The car is a '61 last #'s 110435 with a '65 327 365 hp motor, Muncie m21 (I think? no drain plug) and a Hurst shifter, everything else is pretty original with the exception of the paint, door panels and maybe the seat covers. I am told it had an old frame off resto ( I believe it as I inspected it closely on a lift and the frame still has paint on it and appears rock solid with no rust at all) and has been sitting for years. There does not seem to be any body repairs, all bonding strips there with factory fiberglass oozing out. All gauges work except tach (generator drive noisy so was disconnected ) and speedo. All gauge lights work, lights, blinkers, etc. The heater motor wasn't working but after crawling around under the dash I found it was just a fuse. I got a kick out of the close-line type drive for the windshield wiper drive, I've never seen that before, I tinkered with cars when I was younger but my oldest till now was a 64 GTO tri-power( wish I still had that one, I sold it with an extra parts years ago for $400! ) Anyway I am pleased with my vett except for the following:
 
> The car pulls to the right, can Is it assimple as adjusting the tie rod ends myself or should I get a professional?
 
> The steering wheel has a "flat" spot or a "skip" that seems to occur in different steering wheel positions at different times. Sometimes it happens around a slight corner, sometimes going straight. I have only driven the car close to home and go pretty slow, but is this an immently dangerous situation, could something break or is it just a tired steering box? I seem to recall reading something about this as common on C1's but can't remember where I read it.
 
> Is my car supposed to have a rear sway bar? I understand a sway bar was added from 59 to 60 but mine doesn't have one or the straps that hold up the rear end ( the brackets are there but no straps )  
 
>The car is fitted with rear air shocks, is there any reason this is not a good situation?
 
> I understand the front wheel bearings are not the greatest and need frequent greasing. Am I looking for trouble trying to dissemble, inspect, and re-pack them myself? Should I purchase replacement bearings before I even start? Can you recommend where to purchase them? I read about tightening to 15 ft lbs then back off is this correct information? Do you recommend or are there updated bearing assemblies available? This car was not purchased for any daily,long distance, highway, or high speed driving just a weekend cruiser. 
 
> The rear end seems about 1/4" off center, i.e. the tires are about 1/4" away from the springs on the left side and 3/4" on the right. Is this ok or does it need to be corrected?
 
Thank you in advance for any information/advice you can give.

From Larry Richter, founding SACC treasurer:

Hi:  First off you need to make the car drive correctly and safe.  It sounds like you need to have the steering gear box and the complete front end re-built.  The actual rebuilding you can do your self with new parts if you have the ability and the tools to do the job. You may need such items as king pins, upper and lower bushings and so on. You may want to take the car to someone that understands early Corvettes and just a every day shop.  Shop around your area and get references.  No references on early cars forget the shop. 
I would recommend a change over from the front ball bearings to the roller bearings.  They work great.  Next you need a good high end set of radials.  P205/75R 15 tires.  If you get Volume 14 # 1 of the club magazine " On solid Ground" I wrote a article where you can use a G.M. wheel that is 15X6 and the instructions of the how and where.  They really drive great.
Yes the Rear Stabilizer bar was standard equipment in the 61.
You really do not need rear air shocks just good new ones.  If the car sits too low in the back without the air shocks then you need to have the rear springs re-arched.  Be sure to take them to some who has the original measurements for the arch.
The car will not drive correctly until you do all of the above and get a four wheel alignment.  You may also have rear axle problems ( ie something is bent )
Corvette Central at 1-800-345-4122 is a good source of all the parts.    It sounds like this is not going to be a quick fix, but done correctly the first time for safety and you should get a lot of years of fun driving, go enjoy the car.  Thanks Larry

*********

Hi...I have a 1954 Corvette for which I have been searching for front and rear pinion bearings with no luck.  I have just about worn out my welcome on Google, I have been there so much.  Do you have any suggestions as to where one might find those bearings?
 
Thanks for your help
Dave

From Larry Richter, past Treasurer of SACC:

Hi:  Contact the Corvette Stop at 1-800-924-2493 or 1-530-677-4270  and talk to either Drew or Noland.  They should have them.  Thanks Larry

 

 

 

 

 

**********

I inherited a 1959 corvette in very bad shape I need to know the proper wheel size so I can try to find some. and what years might work.
 
thanks
 
Joe
From Larry Richter, founding Treasurer of SACC
Hi  The wheel size that was standard was 15 X 5 on a 4 and 3/4 bold pattern.  You should be able to find wheels as all 55 and 56 cars had the almost same wheel.  The only difference is most of the car wheels the spider was riveted to the wheel and on Corvette's they were welded.  If you are going to drive the car look back about 2 years in our club magazine, I wrote an article where you can use a 15 x 6 wheel.  Follow the instructions and they drive great.  Let us know if you need any more help.  Thanks Larry

********

Hi,
 
I'm putting an "inline 30AMP fuse holder", on my 1957 Corvette cigarette lighter.  ¿WHAT FUSE AMPERAGE SHOULD I PUT IN THE HOLDER??
 
 
This is a newly restored car.  A few months ago when I grounded the wire from the cegarette ligher element, the entire black ground wire melted onto my carpet.  I have since taken the cegarette lighter apart and I do NOT get the test light to light up when I contact the hot wire on the element and the ground wire on the housing.  I assume the cigarette lighter is OK.  I guess I will find out for sure when I put juice to the fuse holder.
 
I'm leaning towards putting a 7 AMP fuse in the holder.  ANY SUGGESTIONS??
 
Thank you in advance,
Mike

Hi  All of the original material has the cigarette lighter with other items on the car on the same fuse.  They are all 20 amp.  I would use a #12 wire to both the inline and the automobile fuse holder. In the inline I would put the smallest fuse that will hold it.  Start with a 8 amp and if it does not hold it go to a 10 and on up.  A 15 amp should hold fine, if it does not you have another problem in the car.   Good Luck  Thanks Larry

********

 

Dear Sacc,
 
I have a 1960 Corvette - last 6 digits of VIN # are  102761. By all accounts this car rolled off the assembly line in Dec 1959. I believe they started building 1960 C1s in Oct 59 - I guess to have sufficient numbers for the dealers come Jan 1960. Is there any way to get a specific build date from the VIN number as all of the VIN decoders don't seem to go into that much detail. Also how do I find out what options were originally fitted to the car?
 
Regards and thanks for your time
 
Mick

From Ken Amrick, Editor, On Solid Ground:

Mick,
   There is a book that was published from GM records that gives a specific build date for the car, but I don't have it.  I don't believe there is any way to determine what options originally came with the car. 
Ken  

 

 

From Max Brockhouse, SACC President:

Your '60 was built midday January 20, 1960. 
Max

 

 

 

Hi:  Regarding your 60, the more original the car the more you can learn about the car.  Let me explain.  #2761 was build early in the fourth week of January of 1960.  Now for some clues on the options.  To my knowledge there is no original data that will tell you exactly what the car was born with.  I would recommend that you purchase Noland Adams Corvette and Restoration book Vol #1 for reference.
    1.  If it has the original engine, on the block pad will be a engine assembly date and two letter code.  These codes will give you the engine horsepower and the transmission.  If it is a restamp or another engine that information is almost gone, with one exception.  If it has the original tach and the redline is at 5200 rpm it was a 230 or 245 horse. If it is at 6200 it was a 270 or F.I. 290.
    2.  On the fuel injection there are several was to tell if was an original F. I. ( look in Nolands Book )
    3.  Color, Look around the interior of the door hinges, deep inside the trunk, under the rubber of the windshield, in the area where the top folds down for clues.  If it was a complete restoration and a good one, you will not know the original color if it had a color change.
    4.  The rear axle had a tag with two letters if that is still attached that will tell you if it was a positraction and the transmission type.  This will also give you the transmission ( the codes should be the same on the original engine and the original rear axle. )
    5.  Is any of the original upholstery still in the car? Certain interior colors came with certain exterior colors.
    6.  Even if you trace the owners back, they could have all changed some items.
 
Even if everything is changed and the car runs and drives great and you like the car.  "Enjoy it"
 
Thanks Larry

 

******

 

Hi,

I am searching for a correct dated block for a overseas friend with a
62. I know that NCRS accept the a 6 months cast date difference to the
cars build date but I am trying to understand how long a block sat prior
to being assembled.

Approximate birthday for 05443 is January 15, 1962 according to the
birthday calendar.

I have seen different articles about correct numbers matching straight
axle cars that have different time spreads between the casting date and
the build date.
Would 14 days between casting and build be too close for 1962?
What would be the normal spread for a 62 of this period?

The UAW contract states that the workers had a half day on Christmas Eve
and New Years Eve with a full day for Christmas Day and New Years Day.
that would add a total of 3 days during the Christmas Holiday.

I saw you answer about a 59 motor and you gave advice that it would be a
month between cast and build. This adds to my confusion.

Any help would be great fully received.

Thank You
Tony

From: Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer of SACC

Hi:  I am unsure when G.M. starting casting the 870 block.  A guess would be
early in 61 for test purposes.  The first production 62 Corvettes were
assembled in St. Louis in mid August of 6l. That will tell you that the
motor assembly would be in July of 6l.  NCRS generally will allow a 6 months
window on the casting date of the block. ( in your case that would be a July
61 cast dated block up to December 61 for the window.)  A January 62 cast
dated block will be too late ( in most cases) for the car assembly date mid
Jan of 62.  The 870 Block was used in many different vehicles starting for
the model year 62.  Have the block tested before shipping.  Let me know if
you need additional data.  Thank Larry

******




i need some advice.  have a '62 that i've been rebuilding for 17 years.  got it finished and tried to align the front end and it was so far out that neither caster or camber could be adjusted within spec.  all shafts and bushings are new, crossmember and control arms are used but new to the car.  right spring tower needed a repair 'bung' welded in for the upper shaft.  right side is farther out than left.  a friend of mine with a state of the art body shop says  it won't be a problem to flex the crossmember to bring both sides within adjustment range on his frame rack with laser/digital locating system.
 
is this the best way to deal with the problem?  does anyone make crossmember to frame shims that would correct the problem?  i put new, factory spec, shims in when i rebuilt the front end.  is there someone i could talk to who really knows old chevy front ends?  vette service manual says to recenter the control arms on the tower, 'bear' brake and alignment book suggests bending the crossmember.  i don't want to do anything until i know what i'm doing.
 
any help is greatly appreciated.  thanks.   
 
greg 

From Larry Richter, Founding Sacc Treasurer

Hi;  I agree with your friend with the laser/digital system and a four wheel alignment.   You may have more problems then with the front end ( ie the frame) if the frame needs adjusting it will move the body panels around.  This means that the fit on the body will be off.  It may even crack some of the fiberglass.
Suggestion.  First have him see if it is the front end in and of itself.  If it is, and you have the new correct parts it should ( note should) be corrected.  If not and you need to do some frame adjustment you may have a serious problem. Some of the problem may in the alignment of the real axle.  I just follow the Assembly manual with the front end rebuild, correct parts, and a good frame shop.
All old car restorations should start with a four wheel laser alignment and then fit the body to that frame.  Who knows how many accidents the auto was in.  Be careful and let me know.  Thanks Larry

 

**********
Hi.....I am trying to find where I could obtain an exploded view of the shifting mechanism for my 55 corvette.....even a hand drawn picture would be great.....Thanks for any assistance.....Denny

From Max Brockhouse, SACC President

 Your best bet would be to purchase the 55 info book(s) from NCRS or buy the assembly books from Corvette Central or Mid America.

 




**********
Hello…I recently bought a ’61 with a 350 in it…..the tires are not original with P215/65 R15’s on it….I would like to replace with original tires, wheels and hubs but am having trouble finding wheels that will work…do you have a suggestion as to where? Cokers was no help with the wheels….thanks, Jerry

From: Larry Richter, SACC Founding Treasurer

Hi:  Original wheels for 56 to 62 Corvettes are the same as 55 – 56 Full size car.  For Corvettes they were welded and most of the car ones were riveted. From the outside they look the same. You should be able to find lots of them.  Have the wheels balanced first.  You need to get P-205 75 R 15, these are about 3/8 of a inch shorter in height than the original 6:70.  The 205 works really great with a six inch rim ( see a detailed map of the wheels in a issue of Straight Talk about a year ago written my me. )all info is in the article.  I have them on my 62 and they drive really nice.  Any Questions or comments let me know. Many Thanks Larry

 

 

**********

I have a problem that is driving me nuts.  I have a '61 vette, with a 350
> crate motor. I have an overheating problem.  it is ok when driving, but,
> when I get in stop and go traffic, or stop at a long stop light, it
> overheats. I replaced the copper radiator with a Dewitt aluminum radiator.
> I was told the car would run 20% cooler. WRONG.  tried water wetter, NO!
> tried several different rad. caps,, nope. replaced fan and fan clutch with
> a
> six blade flexlite fan with spacer, no.  tried 180 thermo, no. tried 165
> thermo, no. replaced fan clutch, still overheats. I have a shroud.  the
> motor has only a few thousand miles on it. (when I bought the car, it had
> a
> 327 motor in it, and it overheated.) when I first got the car, there was
> no
> recovery system, the first time I would take the car out, like to a show
> and
> park, the radiator would always puke. it did this no matter if the coolant
> was low, or up to the top, didn't ,matter. It also did it with the new
> motor.  I now have a recovery tank on it. I gave up and took it to a shop.
> it was running at 165deg. we let it idle for about ten minutes, and the
> temp
> gage buried past 220. when I shut it off, it blew the cap off the plastic
> recovery tank, and puked all over. I left it with the shop, and after a
> lot
> of money spent, it still overheats. the shop suggests using a 7 blade fan,
> but if a 6 blade didn't work, why would a 7?  there other suggestions were
> to seal the narrow gap between the radiator, and the fan shroud, or to
> call
> De Witt and get an electric fan to mount on the radiator.
> Any suggestions?
> thanks, Chuck.

From Larry Richter, Founding Treasurer, SACC
Hi:  It appears that with all that you have done with the cooling problem,
you may have an internal engine problem.  Could be (1) timing - too far
advanced (2) vacuum, or lack of it (3) A Crack in a head or block that
only opens up with heat, have a leak down test preformed when the engine
is hot, and exhaust gas test in the radiator. (4) timing chain one
tooth off (5) exhaust manifold or pipe blockage
Any good shop should be able to perform most of the tests 

Let me know what you find  Thanks Larry

**********

I have a 1962 corvette with a tired NOM.  I want to install a new Ram Jet
> >350 GM Crate motor. I need to know if this engine can be installed without
> >having to modify the hood to allow clearance for the fuel injection unit?


From: Larry Richter, founding Treasurer, SACC

Hi:  That is a good question.  I should fit , but you may want to take some
measurements first. a. The motor mounts to the top of the engine on both the
new and old engine. b. the set back on the engine for firewall clearance. c.
height of the new and old motor. d. does the new motor need a adaptor to
bolt on the early fuel injection unit. e. and several more.  Thanks Larry

********

 

How difficult is it to install a quick steering adaptor, and is it worth
>> the
>> effort?
>> Thanks, Chuck



From Noland Adams,
President Emeritus




Chuck,

The fast steering adaptor is quite easy to install. First, remove the tie
rod ends from the third arm. Then install the adaptor, which uses those
original holes. Attach the U-bolt around the third arm, and install the
original tie rod ends in the adaptor. Next, you're going to drive slowly to
the closest wheel alignment shop, where you will need the toe-in corrected.
If you don't drive slowly, you'll lose a lot a valuable tread.

I installed a quick steering adaptor on my 1957 Corvette back in the good
old days, which was an early model with 270 hp and a 3 speed transmission.
Is it worth it? That's something you will have to answer to your
satisfaction after it's installed. You'll find the steering is very stiff
when the Corvette is stopped or moving at a low speed. After about 20 mph or
so it becomes easier to steer, and it's a real pleasure at highway speeds.
After I got used to the quicker steering, I would not have considered going
back to the stock ratio.

One little trick that will help you steer easier at a vehicle speed of 5 mph
or less is to run 5 to 6 more PSI in each front tire. You'll drive more on
the center crown of the tire which lowers friction. However, it's not enough
to effect handling and traction safety.

Good Luck!

Later, Noland

 

From Larry Richter, founding
Treasurer, SACC

 

Hi Assuming your entire front end is in perfect condition ( most are not unless a recent rebuild).  It is not too bad. You will need a four wheel alignment after it is installed.  It will drive different so be careful on the highway until you and the car get to know one another.  I personally do not like them unless you are doing some type of racing or auto cross events.   Thanks Larry



****************

 

Dear Sirs:

 On a 1961 Corvette, does the interior door lock knob point to the front or rear of the car? I keep getting contradictory information and have now come to the source of all knowledge on our favorite car.

 I look forward to hearing from you.

 Regards.

 

From: Max Brockhouse, SACC President:

Correct orientation is to the rear, handle down when locked.


 

 _________________________________SACCTECH__________________________________________

 

Dear Solid Axle Corvette Club Tech Desk:

I have a opportunity to purchase a "stated as" a  Exclusively for Corvette Owners Folder (1957 Corvette)
This is the folder that came in all new Corvettes years 1957 to 1962, the "Original Owners", by mailing in the Corvette News Post Card, that was attached to the front of their Corvette's Owners Manual would receive back the folder that was titled:  Exclusively for Corvette Owners, this contained the following items:
 
1- Folder (Blue in color) with the Title Exclusively for Corvette Owners on the front of it.
 
1- 10K Gold Pin, back of the clasp stamped Ballou Reg (in small plastic case)
 
1- Corvette Owners Identification Card (Business card size)
 
1-Copy of Corvette News
 
1-Corvette Patch (Cloth sewn type, round circle) with Chevrolet Corvette, crossed flags, gold V pictured
 
Note:  There may have been also, a welcome letter with this folder additionally.
 
Any additional detailed information/pictures you can supply would very much be appreciated.  Also, if you can or would direct me to a site that could give me the additional information or e-mail any documented photos of any of the items or printed material listed it would be great.  This above listed information is the best I have at present and time and I have no documentation or proof to back any of it up.  I really, need some close-up details of the original items and written material to justify the extreme asking price for this folder and contents.  I haven't first hand knowledge or any expertise with this type of material, but would be happy to supply any gained information or identification from the purchase of this material with you if I do complete the purchase.  I have 1957 Fuel Injected Corvette, and most of the information, about this folder was told to me by the original owner.  He has long since passed away, I didn't really realize at the time of our discussion about the folder.  It was just a conversation at the time, general information that I was getting from him.  I have really attempted to keep the car original and pass it on to my boys, so many of the cars have been revised and cut-up for parts and customized.
 
With the age of this material, and very limited accessibility and extreme high price, you can see what a position it places a buyer in.
 
Thanks in Advance for any help.
Dan



From Noland Adams, President Emeritus, Solid Axle Corvette Club,
Author, Member, National Corvette Museum Hall of Fame

 

 

Dear Dan,
 
I remember the Corvette Owners package very well. I worked in the parts department of the local Chevrolet dealer at the time, and my every day driver was a 1953 Corvette. Whenever anything Corvette-related came to the dealership, I got it. There was an original announcement sent out to all Chevy dealers, and I filled out and sent the form in to Chevrolet. Copy machines were not common in 1957, but now I wish I had kept a copy of that announcement somehow. In the process of four moves, my Corvette package got separated, and then lost.
 
However, I do recall the package very well. It seems that the letter with the package stated that you were fortunate to own a Corvette, Etc. I don't have any photos or other information to share with you. I remember that the patch had a lot of gold threads in it, and it really looked good!
 
You didn't mention the asking price for this package. Remember, as you stated, it's an old and hard-to-find package. However, due to its rarity, I expect  the seller could ask just about any unreasonable amount, and someone would be willing to pay that amount. Just remember that this is old and fragile materials. You'll want to store it in a sealed frame, mounted on acid-free paper. Any good photo frame shop can direct you how to store these valuable items.
 
In fact, the many documents we have that support the originality of our Corvettes should be preserved in the same way. If not, they will fade away into- nothing.
 
Perhaps other readers will have more information on the Corvette Owner's Folder and its contents.
 
Thanks for the question,
 
Noland Adams

Web Editor's Note: Dan, It is obvious that you have lots of knowledge and enthusiasm for solid axle Corvettes.  We would
love to have you join the Solid Axle Corvette Club!

_________________________________SACCTECH__________________________________________

Sir,
    I own 1959 Corvette #6655, with a build date somewhere around April 17, 1959. After searching for 15 years, I finally found what I believe to be a correct numbers matching block.  It is a #519 block with casting date B109. The stamp pad has the original stamping F310CS ( which works for my original 290 horse FI car). My question is in regards to the correct heads to use.  It is my understanding from reading your Restoration Guide- Vol. 1 that the #3755550 head was used until assembly date 3/9, and after that the #3767465 was used which makes that a possibility for my block's 3/10 assembly date.
What would be your recommendation for head number and casting date for my engine?
Thank you in advance for your consideration in this matter,

 

From Noland Adams, President Emeritus, Solid Axle Corvette Club,
Author, Member, National Corvette Museum Hall of Fame

 

 

Dirk,
 
Here's your answers. First, your '59, serial number 6655, had a final assembly date of Friday, April 17, 1959, according to the Corvette Birthday Book. Now let's build a calendar for your Corvette:
 
Casting date on heads _________________See Below_________________
engine block casting date B109 (Feb. 10, 1959)
engine assembly date F310CS (March 10)
Final assembly date April 17, 1959
 
Since the heads were installed on the engine when it was built on March 10, the heads must precede that date. After being cast, the heads are inspected, machined, and assembled. Each of these three processes takes time- at least two weeks. So you are looking for a set of '59 heads that were cast before the approximate date of Feb. 20, 1959. The code would be B209, both the dates on both heads could vary as much as two weeks, as long as they both are dates B209 or earlier.
 
You should not be concerned with the casting numbers of the heads as much as the casting dates. The head casting line usually did not make a complete changeover, as the dies for the heads are a complex marching job. Therefore, the heads could be 550 or 465- surely the supply line of 550 and 465 heads became mixed after the inspection, machining, and assembly processes. So look for heads with the "right" casting date for your engine. It is possible that the heads were cast after the block.
 
Write back if you have more questions.

_______________________________________________________________________________________